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Topic: Archbishop Laud


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In the News (Wed 20 Feb 19)

  
  Archbishop William Laud 1573-1645
Ordained as a priest in 1601, Laud was ambitious and rose quickly through the hierarchy of the Church principally through the patronage of Richard Neile, Bishop of Rochester, through whom he was introduced into the court of King James I. In 1617, Laud accompanied the King on a visit to Scotland as one his chaplains.
Laud's love of ceremony and harmonious liturgy — the "beauty of holiness" — was shared by King Charles, but it was loathed by Puritans, who regarded Laud's Arminianism as dangerously close to Roman Catholicism.
Laud was accused of assuming tyrannical powers in Church and State, of subverting the true religion with popish superstition and of causing the recent disastrous wars against the Scots.
www.british-civil-wars.co.uk /biog/laud.htm   (848 words)

  
 William Laud information - Search.com
Laud was born in Reading, Berkshire, of comparatively low origins (a fact of which he was to remain sensitive throughout his career) and educated at Reading School and, through a White Scholarship, St.
Laud was a sincere Anglican and loyal Englishman, who must have been frustrated at the charges of Popery levelled against him by the Puritan element in the Church.
Laud's policy was influenced by another aspect of his character: his desire to impose total uniformity on the Church.
www.search.com /reference/William_Laud   (652 words)

  
 Chapter 2 - Shrewsbury and Archbishop Laud
This was one of Archbishop Laud's chief aims and his attempts to recover the Church's lost wealth from the lay impropriators were amongst the main reasons for his unpopularity.
The attempt by Laud to regain control of the Church's finances was paralleled by his determined efforts to control the appointment of clergy to vacant livings.
Laud, having suppressed the Feoffees seems, in this instance at least, to have made no attempt to repeal their actions; indeed, his subsequent policy of encouraging augmentations was based on similar principles.
www.serjeantson.com /history/thesis/Chapter2.htm   (1575 words)

  
 Creeds of Christendom, with a History and Critical notes. Volume I. The History of Creeds. | Christian Classics ...
He was indefatigable and punctilious in the discharge of his innumerable duties as archbishop and prime minister, member of the courts of Star-Chamber and High-Commission, of the committee of trade, the foreign committee, and as lord of the treasury.
Laud thought that his way of defense was the only one by which the Church of England could justify her separation from the Church of Rome.
In one word, Laud was a typical Anglo-Catholic, who unchurched all non-episcopal Churches, and regarded the Anglican Church as an independent sister of the Latin and Greek communions, and as the guardian of the whole truth as against the 'sects,' and of nothing but the truth as against Rome.
www.ccel.org /ccel/schaff/creeds1.ix.viii.i.html   (9165 words)

  
 John Milton
Laud performed the marriage despite his support of the “doctrine of the absolute indissolubility of the sacrament of marriage, and he must therefore be considered to have performed that solemnity between Lord Devon and Lady Rich, and so sanctioned their living together, while he believed her to be the wife of another man” (www.britannia.com).
Laud sentenced Dr. Leighton to “pay a fine of ₤10,000, to be twice set in the pillory and whipped, to have his ears cut off and his nose slit, and to be branded in the face with the letters SS (for Sower of Sedition) and to be imprisoned…for the remainder of his life” (www.britannia.com).
Laud was soon blamed for the conflicts between the King and Parliament, and King Charles abolished the oath in October 1640.
www.library.fau.edu /npb/gribro.htm   (2394 words)

  
 ::Archbishop William Laud::
Archbishop William Laud was one of the senior advisors to Charles I.
Puritan leaders openly criticised Laud and in 1637 three Puritans, John Bastwick, Henry Burton and William Prynne were arrested on the orders of Laud and had their ears cut off and were branded on the cheeks for writing pamphlets that criticised Laud’s beliefs and what Laud was doing within the Church.
Laud was also able to put his own men in positions of authority within the church in the late 1620’s and early 1630’s —the result of, from Laud’s point of view, a number of fortuitous deaths.
www.historylearningsite.co.uk /Archbishop-William-Laud.htm   (896 words)

  
 William Laud
William Laud lived much of his life in the days of King Charles I. It was a turbulent time throughout, one of violent divisions in the Church of England, eventually culminating in the English Civil War.
In 1611, however, Laud was appointed President of St John's despite opposition from the Calvinists, who maintained that there had been irregularities in his election.
Archbishop Laud regarded it as a seemly, dignified garment, an appropriate response to the Apostle Paul's injunction, "Let all things be done decently and in order." The Calvinists stood by their objections, and violently interrupted services at which the surplice was worn.
www.manotick.org /stjames/Archival_pages/william_laud.htm   (832 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - William Laud (Protestant Christianity, Biography) - Encyclopedia
Laud thought of the English church as a branch of the universal church, claimed apostolic succession for the bishops, and believed that the Anglican ritual should be strictly followed in all churches.
In 1633, Laud became archbishop of Canterbury and continued on a larger scale his efforts to enforce High Church forms of worship.
The tyranny of his courts and his identification of the episcopal form of church government with the absolutism of Charles brought about violent opposition not only from the Puritans but also from those who were jealous of the rights of Parliament.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/L/Laud-Wil.html   (377 words)

  
 William Laud, Archbishop and Martyr
William Laud, born in 1573, was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1633 to 1645 in the days of King Charles I.
Archbishop Laud regarded it as a seemly, dignified, garment, an appropriate response to the
Laud was also the prosecutor of record in the trials of those who published seditious or violent and abusive attacks on the doctrine and discipline of the Church, and the Puritans produced an abundance of scurrilous attacks on those who disagreed with them, which were duly punished, with Laud taking the responsibility.
justus.anglican.org /resources/bio/76.html   (779 words)

  
 Laud and Prynne
The circumstances which led to the archbishop’s death are related by the writers of our national history, upon the authority of impartial annalists, and collectors of facts relating to the troublesome times in which he lived and died.
Be that as it may, the work came out with the license of the archbishop’s chaplain prefixed, and involved the author, and all that were concerned in it, in a fearful prosecution in the court of the star chamber.
Laud was brought to the block, and Prynne in his writings, and in parliament, consistently resisted oppression from whatever it proceeded.
www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com /Text/Hone/laud_and_prynne.htm   (1201 words)

  
 William Laud - HighBeam Encyclopedia
Laud thought of the English church as a branch of the universal church, claimed apostolic succession for the bishops, and believed that the Anglican ritual should be strictly followed in all churches.
In 1633, Laud became archbishop of Canterbury and continued on a larger scale his efforts to enforce High Church forms of worship.
The tyranny of his courts and his identification of the episcopal form of church government with the absolutism of Charles brought about violent opposition not only from the Puritans but also from those who were jealous of the rights of Parliament.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Laud-Wil.html   (289 words)

  
  Magna Carta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
At the time of John’s reign there was still a great deal of controversy as to how the Archbishop of Canterbury was to be elected, although it had become traditional that the monarch would appoint a candidate with the approval of the monks of Canterbury.
However Laud was not trying to say that Magna Carta was evil, merely stating the truth about its origins, as he used the document in his defence.
They prized The Charter so highly that they believed all such as Archbishop Laud who “trod Magna Carta…under their feet” deserved to be attacked at all levels, and that anyone of any status attempting to do the same should be treated in the same way.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Magna_Carta   (8240 words)

  
 Laud
As organist/choirmaster, I lead the congregation and choirs in this traditional Palm Sunday Children's Processional, "All Glory, Laud, and Honor." The year: 1995; the place: Arlington, Virginia; Mount Olivet United Methodist Church; the significance (other than this high and holy day): this was the last Palm Sunday for the congregation in the old (pre-renovated) sanctuary.
Laud means glorification, praise; a hymn or song of praise.
William Laud (October 7 1573 January 10 1645) was Archbishop of Canterbury and a fervent supporter of King Charles I of England, whom he encouraged to believe in divine right.
hober.com /laud.html   (411 words)

  
 The Baldwin Project: Charles I by Jacob Abbott
The Archbishop of Canterbury is styled the Lord Primate of all England.
He had observed that Laud, who had been advanced to some high stations in the Church by his father, King James, was desirous to enlarge and strengthen the powers and prerogatives of the Church, just as he himself was endeavoring to do in respect to those of the throne.
If Laud had [150] let the affair pass, it would have ended with a laugh in the street; but by resenting it, he gave it notoriety, caused it to be recorded, and has perpetuated the memory of the jest to all future times.
www.mainlesson.com /display.php?author=abbott&book=charles1&story=archbishop&PHPSESSID=63f3797675b0125bd291acf35a876672   (4189 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Anglicanism
In 1413 Archbishop Arundel, with the assent of Convocation, affirmed against the Lollards the faith of the English Church in a number of test articles, including the Divine institution of the Papacy and the duty of all Christians to render obedience to it (Wilkins, Concilia, III, 355).
At the same time she reasserted in the full the claim made by Henry VIII as to the Authority of the Crown in matters ecclesiastical, and the great religious changes made after her accession were carried out and enforced in a royal visitation commissioned by the royal authority.
Archbishop Laud, in 1640, had a series of canons drawn up in Convocation and duly published, but this attempt at spiritual independence was speedily suppressed.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/01498a.htm   (5537 words)

  
 Laud, Liberty, and Levellers
For the time, the rising tide of Puritanism is stemmed by William Laud, the martyr archbishop, who in season and out of season preached the doctrine of equality before the law, against the Puritan theory of immunity in the case of courtiers and gentlemen.
One of the complaints of Laud's adversary Henry Burton against the Common Prayer was, 'it cut short sermons.' The worship that is social strikes at the individualism of the man in the pulpit; it is an apostolical reminder to him not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think.
Laud strove by every means in his power to prevent such enclosures as depopulated the countryside, and, by heading the Commission of Depopulation, infuriated the capitalistic land-owners whose interests were aligning themselves with the industrial capitalists of the towns.
www.anglocatholicsocialism.org /laud.html   (3281 words)

  
 The Baldwin Project: Charles I by Jacob Abbott
They had determined that stern necessity required that Laud and Strafford must die; and the only object of going through the formality of a trial was to soften the violence of the proceeding a little, by doing all that could be done toward establishing a legal justification of the deed.
Laud, who had been his friend and fellow-laborer in the king's service, was confined also in the Tower, awaiting his turn to come to trial.
The old man, for Laud was now nearly [201] seventy years of age, attempted to speak, but he could not command himself sufficiently to express what he wished to say, and he fell back into the arms of his attendants.
www.mainlesson.com /display.php?author=abbott&book=charles1&story=downfall   (3470 words)

  
 Memoirs of the Puritans  Edward
He was made proctor of the university; but refusing to conform to certain” points, he was called before the vice-chancellor, who laid his case before Laud, chancellor of the university, whom he petitioned for relief; but it does not appear that he received any redress.
Upon the commencement of hostilities between the king and parliament, Oxford being garrisoned by the royal forces, he was deprived of his fellowship, and expelled from the college for refusing to espouse the royal cause.
Archbishop Laud, being afterwards a prisoner in the tower, refused him the rectory of Chatham in Kent, on account of his puritan principles; and when appointed rector of that place by an ordinance of parliament, 1643, his lordship still refused his allowance, though the refusal was now of no avail.
www.apuritansmind.com /MemoirsPuritans/MemoirsPuritansEdwardCorbet.htm   (624 words)

  
 Newman Reader - British Critic - Le Bas
Laud, though not without some reluctance, consented; and the consequence was that, according to his own account of the matter to Bishop Neile, 'he was fain to sit patiently, and hear himself abused, almost an hour together; being pointed at as he sat.'
Laud, in his anxiety to correct their almost brutal irreverence, was desirous that they who entered a church, should testify, by an obeisance directed towards its most hallowed spot, that they were conscious of treading within a precinct dedicated to the majesty of Heaven.
Laud bowed to the altar, Butler put up a cross; this was enough in the eyes of the multitude to asperse the fame of the former as well as of the latter; and it cannot be more than aspersed in consequence of those opportunities which he had and used above Butler for diffusing his principles.
www.newmanreader.org /works/britishcritic/lebas.html   (10117 words)

  
 King James and His Translators - Article
Andrewes had a large influence on William Laud, who was a leader among the younger Anglicans during the reign of James, and who became Archbishop during the reign of Charles I, James's son.
A disciple or follower of Lancelot Andrewes, William Laud (1573-1645), who was a leader among the younger Anglicans during the reign of James, would become the Archbishop during the reign of Charles I, James's son.
Archbishop Laud can be linked to using the power of the High Commission Court to make the KJV the officially approved translation.
www.dtl.org /versions/article/king-james.htm   (2467 words)

  
 mazdiss
Archbishop Laud rose to eminence in a period during which it was apparent that the Church of England meant one of two different things to different men.
When one studies Laud it would be rather easy to assume that most people disliked him and saw him as a threat but I would argue that there was a religious divide, that is to say that there were those who did identify with Laudianism and the reforms of the 1630s.
Laud then, although appealing and nice to friends was probably as easy man to dislike if you came across him under the wrong circumstances or new very little of him.
www.arasite.org /mazdiss.html   (9757 words)

  
 Archbishop Laud
Laud was archbishop of Canterbury, and religious adviser to Charles I, who persecuted religious dissidents, who in turn persecuted him.
In 1611, on account of his long service in the church, Laud was appointed one of the royal chaplains to James I. In this position, he supported James in his attempts to unify the Churches of England and Scotland.
In 1633, Laud became Archbishop of Canterbury, and received instructions from the King to pursue his form of justice in the Royal courts.
www.wardsbookofdays.com /7october.htm   (428 words)

  
 The Confessing Reader » Blog Archive » William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1645   (Site not responding. Last check: )
He was the most prominent of a new generation of churchmen who disliked many of the ritual practices which had developed during the reign of Elizabeth the First (many of which began during the reign of her younger brother, Edward VI), and who were bitterly opposed by the Puritan party in the Church of England.
Laud believed the Church of England to be in direct continuity with the medieval Church, and he stressed the unity of the Church and State, exalting the role of the king as Supreme Governor of the Church.
As head of the courts of High Commission and the Star Chamber, Laud persecuted Puritans and was abhorred for the harsh sentencing of some of the prominent members of the party.
reader.classicalanglican.net /?p=958   (567 words)

  
 William Laud
William Laud, born in 1573, was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1633 to 1645 in the days of King Charles I. It was a turbulent time throughout, one of violent divisions in the Church of England, eventually culminating in the English Civil War.
Archbishop Laud regarded it as a seemly, dignified, garment, an appropriate response to the Apostle Paul's injunction, "Let all things be done decently and in order." The Puritans stood by their objections, and violently interrupted services at which the surplice was worn.
In 1630 (before Laud became Archbishop), when Alexander Leighton published Zion's Pleas Against Prelacy, a violent attack on the Bishops as tools of Antichrist, he was sentenced to be publicly whipped and branded, and to have his ears cut off.
satucket.com /lectionary/William_Laud.htm   (758 words)

  
 Folger Institute Stress Site
Archbishop Laud, Bishop of Canterbury, was imprisoned, and as the war continued, he was executed, in 1645.
Furthermore, Laud stressed hierarchy in the Church, and with it, the power to punish lesser clergy who did not worship as his regime felt they should.
Further, Laud stressed the importance of "the beauty of holiness," which led him to refurbish and redecorate many churches—including the stained glass.
www.folger.edu /html/folger_institute/cultural_stress/church_good_bad.html   (3098 words)

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