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Topic: Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty


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  Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) are areas of countryside with significant landscape value, specially designated by a government agency in the United Kingdom.
The primary purpose of AONB designation is to conserve and enhance the natural beauty of the landscape, with two secondary aims: meeting the need for quiet enjoyment of the countryside and having regard for the interests of those who live and work there.
The smallest AONB is the Isles of Scilly (1976), 16 km², and the largest AONB is the Cotswolds (1966), 2,038 km².
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Area_of_Outstanding_Natural_Beauty   (462 words)

  
 Malvern Hills AONB   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
To the west, alternate limestone and sandstone beds undulate in pastoral scarps and vales with a pleasing rural pattern of meadows, fields and orchards and a maze of narrow lanes.
This is an area of pastoral farming, with dairying and stock-rearing, plus fruit growing, mixed crops and forestry.
The AONB has a population of approximately 13,000 and villages such as Malvern Wells have experienced considerable growth in their retired population and in workers commuting to Birmingham and Worcester.
www.countryside.gov.uk /caseStudies/Malver_Hills_AONB.asp   (330 words)

  
 Naturenet: Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty & National Scenic Areas   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
AONBs and National Parks are actually of equal importance for landscape and scenic beauty, the difference is that National Park Authorities exist and have special powers to conserve and enhance National Parks.
AONBs are designated by the Countryside Agency, in England, and the Countryside Council for Wales in Wales.
National Scenic Areas were first identified in the report "Scotland's Scenic Heritage", published by CCS in 1978, and were accepted as the practical basis for landscape conservation in Scotland.
www.naturenet.net /status/aonb.html   (839 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is a United Kingdom.
Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty are areas of England, Wales and Northern Ireland so designated under the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act (1949).
There are 41 AONBs in total, selected because of their flora, fauna, historical and cultural associations and scenic views.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Area-of-Outstanding-Natural-Beauty   (200 words)

  
 Cllr Rosemary Todd, Executive Member for Environment Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) Draft ...
AONB Management Plans rely on cooperation and goodwill by many different individuals and organisations if they are to be effective.
The AONB Management Plan can be a powerful inspirational tool, for promoting a shared vision about what the AONB is about now and what it could be in the future, as well as a vehicle for delivering action on the ground......
There should be a section addressing how a better understanding of the AONB can be achieved and more emphasis on the value of the AONB as a resource for life long learning, education and interpretation, of the natural and built heritage and involvement in conservation.
www.bathnes.gov.uk /committee_papers/Executive/WL2003/WL030912/05CotswoldAONB.htm   (1740 words)

  
 East Devon Council - Area Outstanding Natural Beauty   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONBs) have been described as the jewels of the English landscape.
The area's population is spread between small towns and villages with the AONB boundary skirting the resorts of Lyme Regis, Exmouth, Sidmouth and Seaton.
Broadly, the area extends from Wellington in the north to Honiton in the south and from Cullompton in the west to Chard in the east.
www.eastdevon.gov.uk /index/visiting/countryside_index/areas_of_outstanding_natural_beauty.htm   (576 words)

  
 Introduction | The Chilterns AONB
The Chiltern Hills are a beautiful, unspoilt corner of England.
Today, the area continues to provide a living for farmers and foresters and is home to 100,000 people.
The main aim of the AONB is to conserve and enhance the natural beauty of the area, which means that the Chilterns is protected for future generations to enjoy.
www.chilternsaonb.org /introduction.html   (279 words)

  
 Bridgnorth District Council - Shropshire hills area of outstanding natural beauty
Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty are designated under the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 and the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000.
They are countryside areas where the combination of features has produced a landscape whose distinctive character and beauty are so outstanding that it is in the nation's interest to safeguard them.
The primary purpose of designation is to conserve and enhance their natural beauty, which includes landform and geology, plants and animals, landscape features and the form of settlements created over the centuries.
www.bridgnorth-dc.gov.uk /static/page771.htm   (674 words)

  
 Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000
(6) A conservation board may, within six months of the date on which they are established, adopt an area of outstanding natural beauty management plan prepared for their area of outstanding natural beauty by the relevant local authority as their area of outstanding natural beauty management plan, and publish it under subsection (1).
(7) Subject to subsection (8), a conservation board shall review their area of outstanding natural beauty management plan before the end of the period of five years beginning with the date on which it was published and, after the first review, at intervals of not more than five years.
(a) in the case of an area of outstanding natural beauty which is wholly comprised in one principal area, the local authority for that area, and
web.uct.ac.za /depts/pbl/jgibson/iczm/legis/acts2000/00037--o.htm   (1016 words)

  
 Shropshire Hills AONB
The Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty is 802 km
One of 41 AONBs in England and Wales, the Shropshire Hills are renowned for their varied geology, wealth of wildlife and historical richness.
The Shropshire Hills AONB Partnership is charged with caring for the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.
www.shropshirehillsaonb.co.uk   (141 words)

  
 Designation | Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The AONB is dominated by the River Wye, and includes 45 miles (72 km.) of its dramatic lower stretches.
A natural divide separates the predominantly Old Red Sandstone of the gentle Herefordshire countryside from the carboniferous limestone of the southern plateau.
The area falls within three different Local Authority areas, each in a different Government region: 36% of the area is in Monmouthshire (Wales), with 46% in Herefordshire (West Midlands) and 18% in Gloucestershire, in the Forest of Dean District.
www.wyevalleyaonb.org /pages/wye_so_special/designation.asp   (765 words)

  
 The designation of the Tamar Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Cornwall and Devon County Councils first suggested that the Tamar Valley should be designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) in 1963, but it was not until August 1995 that the designation was finally granted.
AONB designation recognises that a landscape is of national importance and should be protected and enhanced for the benefit of this and future generations.
The Tamar Valley AONB is situated on the border of Devon and Cornwall and encompasses the valleys of the Tamar, Tavy and Lynher rivers.
www.tamarvalley.org.uk /new/3_2_designation.htm   (434 words)

  
 Homepage | Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB)
The Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is an internationally important protected landscape.
A Management Plan for the area enlists a range of partners in conserving and enhancing its beauty for the benefit of present and future generations.
www.wyevalleyaonb.org.uk   (108 words)

  
 Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty - About Us   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Cotswolds became an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in 1966.
Being an AONB means that the Cotswolds are protected as a very special landscape - a living working landscape - of national importance for everyone to enjoy.
It is one of 41 AONBs in England and Wales and the largest, covering 790 sq miles (2,038 sq kms) and 78 miles (126 kms) from north to south.
www.cotswoldsaonb.org.uk /about.htm   (400 words)

  
 COTSWOLD - Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
AONBs were first introduced in the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act (1949) to protect areas of great natural beauty. (This legislation also introduced National Parks). There are now 41 AONBs in England and Wales, covering about 18% of the country. 
The Cotswolds AONB was designated in 1966 and is the largest AONB in England, with an area of 790 sq.
The role of Cotswold District Council in the AONB
www.cotswold.gov.uk /nqcontent.cfm?a_id=473   (244 words)

  
 aboutus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The purpose of designation as an AONB is to conserve the natural beauty (which includes wildlife and cultural heritage as well as scenery) of the area.
The Cornwall AONB consists of 12 separate parts of the county, including 10 stretches of coastline, the Camel Estuary and Bodmin Moor
The AONB Partnership is currently made up of the 7 local authorities within Cornwall, along with representatives from the Countryside Agency, National Trust and Government Office of the South West.
www.cornwall-aonb.gov.uk /about.htm   (356 words)

  
 Parks.it - parks and other protected areas in the United Kingdom
The two most important types of protected areas in the UK are National Parks and AONBs (Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty).
Areas are designated for their landscape qualities for the purpose of conserving and enhancing their natural beauty.
In Scotland there are 40 NSAs (National Scenic Areas), a kind of protected area corresponding to the AONBs of the rest of the country (England, Wales and Northern Ireland).
www.parks.it /world/UK/Eindex.html   (141 words)

  
 Arnside Online, Cumbria, England - Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
This small, but distinctive Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) lies at the head of Morecambe Bay and spans the county boundaries of Cumbria and Lancashire.
A number of endangered species are resident in the area such as the High Brown Fritillary butterfly, birds such as the Bittern and Marsh Harrier and the Lancastrian Whitebeam to name but a few.
The Arnside/Silverdale AONB Landscape Trust is a membership charity which exists to encourage awareness and raise funds to improve the landscape and conservation value of the area.
www.arnside-online.co.uk /aonb.htm   (399 words)

  
 Pinewoods Holiday Park - Wells-next-the-Sea, Norfolk, England
Pinewoods Holiday Park is set in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty on the North Norfolk Heritage Coast, approximately three-quarters-of-a-mile from the town of Wells-next-the-sea.
The Park is bounded on the north by a strip of mature pine trees, nestling beside the beautiful sandy beach with its attractive beach huts.
The area provides the visitor with ample opportunities to enjoy peace and solitude - it is a bird watchers paradise with a National Nature Reserve and the salt marshes nearby.
www.pinewoods.co.uk   (256 words)

  
 Penwith District Council - Launch of a Management Plan for the Cornwall Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
The Cornwall AONB Partnership has identified many challenges facing these 12 locally distinctive but nationally important areas of the Cornish landscape, challenges which need to be met in ways future generations will judge to have been far sighted and unselfish of this generation.
The Cornwall AONB Partners are: Cornwall's 7 local authorities, Cornwall Association of Local Councils, National Farmers Union, Country Land and Business Association, Cornwall Enterprise, DEFRA, Environment Agency, English Nature, The National Trust and the Countryside Agency (which also provides 75% funding for the Partnership's AONB Unit).
AONBs were originally established as areas where the natural beauty and amenity were considered of national importance, thus requiring protection to national standards.
www.penwith.gov.uk /index.cfm?articleid=8962   (1042 words)

  
 The Gower Peninsula   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The wonderful and varied landscape of the Gower Peninsula was the first place in Britain to be designated as an 'Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty' (AONB) by the Countryside Agency on behalf of the UK government, and is one of only five within Wales.
Scattering the landscape are historic reminders of past 'Gowerians', from castles, medieval churches, iron age fortifications, and prehistoric standing stones.
All this against an awe-inspiring natural backdrop of hills, valleys, beaches, clifftops, commons, woodland, dunes, marshes and caves.
www.explore-gower.co.uk   (147 words)

  
 Artistic influences | Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB)
The spectacular beauty of the Wye Gorge has been celebrated by artists and writers for more than 250 years.
Whilst the area has never produced an artist who has recorded the area like Constable did Suffolk, the landscape was, and still is a great inspiration to all.
There are numerous opportunities to view their work, or to give rein to your own creativity at courses and workshops in the area.
wyevalleyaonb.co.uk /pages/wye_so_special/artistic.asp   (330 words)

  
 House of Lords Amendments - Countryside and Rights of Way Bill
(b) provide for any function of a local authority, so far as relating to the area of outstanding natural beauty in question, to be exercisable concurrently by the local authority and by the conservation board.
(b) every local authority whose area consists of or includes the whole or part of the area of outstanding natural beauty.
(a) for the local authority members to be appointed by such of the local authorities for areas wholly or partly comprised in the area of outstanding natural beauty as may be specified in or determined under the order ("the relevant councils"), or
www.parliament.the-stationery-office.co.uk /pa/ld199900/ldbills/086/amend/ml86iiij.htm   (5801 words)

  
 GUIDELINES FOR HORSE RELATED DEVELOPMENT - MENDIP HILLS AREA OF OUTSTANDING NATURAL BEAUTY - SUPPLEMENTARY PLANNING ...
1.1 The Mendip Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) designation is recognition that the distinctive character and natural beauty of the area is of national importance and that it is in the nation's interest to safeguard it from inappropriate development.
The AONB has experienced increasing numbers of planning applications for private and commercial riding stables and manéges which should be in character with the AONB landscape.
Although it is regrettable to be unable to take on board the comments of locally based groups it is felt that their comments overlooked that the fact that the Mendip Hills AONB is a landscape of national importance and that all development proposals are given the most careful consideration, particularly in terms of visual impact.
www.bathnes.gov.uk /committee_papers/Executive/WL2004/WL040213/07E473HorseRelatedDevSPG.htm   (1155 words)

  
 Mendip Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
Located to the south of Bristol, the area includes the lakes of the Chew Valley and the western and central parts of the limestone ridge known as the Mendip Hills.
The primary purpose of AONB designation is to conserve and enhance the natural beauty of the area, which means that the area is protected for future generations to enjoy.
The 41 AONBs in England and Wales share equal status with National Parks in terms of scenic beauty and landscape protection.
www.mendiphills.org.uk   (1165 words)

  
 A Slaidburn Village Website, in the Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Lancashire.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The area is currently administered by Lancashire County Council as opposed to the old West Riding Council abolished in 1974.
Slaidburn is in the Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (A.O.N.B), administered by the Ribble Valley Borough Council from the market town of Clitheroe.
The Hodder Valley is still one of the most beautiful parts of the Forest of Bowland, or Bolland as it is known by locals, and is perhaps one of the most lovely valleys in England.
www.slaidburn.org.uk   (378 words)

  
 The Norfolk Broads - An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Norfolk Broads - An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
The Norfolk Broads is one of the most beautiful, varied and scientifically important wetland areas in the world.
The Broads themselves are the result of peat-digging for fuel in the medieval period between 1100 and 1400 and the original rivers began to be embanked around 1300 to prevent the surrounding marshland from flooding.
www.woodsdyke-boatyard.co.uk /broads   (233 words)

  
 Walks in the Silverdale/Arnside Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
The area covered by this book is compact - north to south from Milnthorpe to Carnforth is 7 miles; west to east from Arnside Point to Hutton Roof is 8 miles.
Much of the area lies within the Arnside/Silverdale Area of Outstanding National Beauty - almost the whole of the land to the west of the A6 between Warton and Milnthorpe.
Naturalists know the area well, for it is rich in a varied flora and fauna, especially at the several nature reserves and the RSPB reserve at Leighton Moss.
www.mapsworldwide.com /maps_8995.htm   (455 words)

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