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Topic: Aristophanes


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  Aristophanes and His Comedies
However corrupt and vulgar Aristophanes may have been in his personal propensities, however much he may offend decency and taste in his individual jests, yet in the plan and conduct of his poems in general, we cannot refuse him the praise of the carefulness and masterly skill of the finished artist.
As we cannot help recognizing in Aristophanes' exercise of his varied and multiform art, the richest development of almost every poetical talent, so the extraordinary capacities of his hearers, which may be inferred from the structure of his works, are at every fresh perusal a matter of astonishment.
Aristophanes is one of the men for whom opinion is mainly a matter of feeling, not of reason.
www.theatrehistory.com /ancient/aristophanes001.html   (2175 words)

  
  Aristophanes - MSN Encarta
Aristophanes is believed to have been born in Athens, Greece, in the deme, or township, of Cydathenaeum.
The Knights (424 bc), the first of the plays of Aristophanes to be presented under his own name, is a devastating satire about Athenian politician and military leader Cleon, champion of the democratic forces and leader of the war party.
The plays of Aristophanes exerted considerable influence on English satire, notably that of English playwright Ben Jonson in the 17th century and English novelist Henry Fielding in the 18th century.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761575957/Aristophanes.html   (462 words)

  
 Aristophanes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Many of Aristophanes' plays were political, and often satirized well-known citizens of Athens and their conduct in the Peloponnesian War and after.
Aristophanes was probably victorious at least once at the City Dionysia, with Babylonians in 426 (IG II2 2325.
(Aristophanes’ third son is sometimes said to have been called not Nicostratus but Philetaerus, and a man by that name appears in the catalogue of Lenaia victors with two victories, the first probably in the late 370s, at IG II2 2325.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Aristophanes   (935 words)

  
 Aristophanes Index
Aristophanes and His Comedies - Biography of the Greek dramatist and analysis of his poetic qualities.
Aristophanes: Monologues - An index of monologues by the Greek dramatist.
Aristophanes: Poems - An index of poems by the Greek dramatist.
www.theatrehistory.com /ancient/aristophanes.html   (252 words)

  
 Aristophanes - Crystalinks
Many of Aristophanes' plays were political, and often satirized well-known citizens of Athens and their conduct in the Peloponnesian War and after.
Aristophanes was probably victorious at least once at the City Dionysia, with Babylonians in 426 (IG II2 2325.
(AristophanesÂą third son is sometimes said to have been called not Nicostratus but Philetaerus, and a man by that name appears in the catalogue of Lenaia victors with two victories, the first probably in the late 370s, at IG II2 2325.
www.crystalinks.com /aristophanes.html   (660 words)

  
 The Clouds - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Clouds (Nephelai) is a comedy written by the Ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes lampooning the sophists and the intellectual trends of late fifth-century Athens.
Although it took last place in the comic festival Aristophanes entered it in, it is one of his most famous works because it offers a highly unusual portrayal of Socrates.
Aristophanes re-wrote the play after its initial failure, inserting an interlude into the middle of the action in which the playwright himself takes the stage and chastizes the audience for their poor sense of humor.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/The_Clouds   (973 words)

  
 [No title]
Aristophanes is the only surviving representative of Greek Old Comedy, the exuberant, satirical form of festival drama which flourished during the heyday of classical Athenian culture in the fifth century BC.
Finally, Wealth is Aristophanes' last surviving comedy, in which Ploutos, the god of wealth is cured of his blindness and the remarkable social consequences of his new discrimination are exemplified.
Aristophanes had his first comedy produced when he was about twenty-one, and wrote forty plays in all.
www.lycos.com /info/aristophanes.html   (678 words)

  
 Aristophanes Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
Aristophanes (448-after 385 BC) was the greatest of the writers of the Old Comedy, which flourished in Athens in the 5th century BC, and the only one with any complete plays surviving.
Aristophanes clearly felt that the great days of tragedy were over, and in The Frogs, produced in 405, he showed Dionysus, the patron god of Attic drama, going down to Hades to bring Euripides back.
Aristophanes continued to write plays after the end of the war, and two of the surviving plays date from this period: The Ecclesiazousai (Women in Parliament) of 392, a skit on the ideas of communism in marriage and in ownership of property--ideas later put forward by Plato in the Republic--and Plutus (Wealth) of 388.
www.bookrags.com /biography/aristophanes   (1498 words)

  
 Aristophanes (c. 444-380 B.C.)
ARISTOPHANES, the son of Philippus, was probably an Athenian, born about 444 B.C. He was a lover of pleasure and of society, and is introduced as one of the brilliant revellers in Plato's Banquet.
Aristophanes was the unrivalled master of the Old Comedy, i.e.
In the Birds, perhaps the best of all Aristophanes' comedies, if not the best of all extant burlesques, where the Birds resolve in council to build a new city in the sky, to be called Cloud-cuckoo-town, the poet was satirizing the extravagant schemes of imperial aggrandisement which led to the ruin of Athens.
www.usefultrivia.com /biographies/aristophanes_001.html   (1091 words)

  
 Aristophanes
During that time the telling satire of his pen was brought to bear alike on prominent men, political trends, and social foibles.
For some reason Aristophanes' first three plays were brought out under the name of one of his actors.
The local character of the plays of the first period had by the third period given way to a cosmopolitanism that marks Aristophanes as the transition-link between what is termed "Old Comedy" and the "Middle" and "New Comedy" of Greece.
www.theatredatabase.com /ancient/aristophanes_001.html   (503 words)

  
 Aristophanes (c. 448-380 B.C.)
The people were increasingly demoralized by the ongoing conflicts of the Peloponnesian War and the loss of their greatest hero, Pericles, had been taken from them and replaced by unscrupulous politicians such as Cleon and Hyperbolus.
The people of Athens were quick to recognize their tyrannical leader as the Paphlagonian tanner in The Knights, and although the play had no real political effect, it took first prize at the festival.
Aristophanes favorite target, however, was another literary figure--the tragic poet Euripides.
www.imagi-nation.com /moonstruck/clsc13.htm   (955 words)

  
 Aristophanes - Biography and Works
Many of Aristophane's rollicking comedies were written for and performed during the religious festivals Dionysia and Lenea.
The Knights (424), with Aristophanes himself acting as Cleon, is a controversial and unapologetic attack of the demagogue Cleon.
Aristophanes captured the spirit of the Republic in decline..
www.online-literature.com /aristophanes   (523 words)

  
 Aristophanes
Aristophanes was an Athenian citizen of the tribe Pandionis, and the deme Cydathene.
He can banter Euripides with an ingenuity of light mockery which makes it seem for the time as if the leading Aristophanic trait was the art of seeing all things from their prosaic side.
A sympathetic reader of Aristophanes can hardly fail to perceive that, while his political and intellectual tendencies are well marked, his opinions, in so far as they color his comedies, are too indefinite to reward, or indeed to tolerate, analysis.
www.nndb.com /people/843/000087582   (2550 words)

  
 HighBeam Encyclopedia - Aristophanes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
ARISTOPHANES [Aristophanes], c.448 BC-c.388 BC, Greek playwright, Athenian comic poet, greatest of the ancient writers of comedy.
Aristophanes was conservative in all things, hence he distrusted sophistry and Socrates alike, satirized Euripides' art as degenerate, and deplored the tendency to excessive imperialism that ruined Athens in the Syracusan expedition.
Aristophanes' Greek is exceptionally beautiful, and many of his choruses are among the finest lyric pieces in Greek literature.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/A/Aristph.asp   (348 words)

  
 aristophanes Books (Used, New, Out-of-Print) - Alibris
Aristophanes' comic plays, "Lysistrata, Women at the Thesmophoria" and "Assemblywomen" contain the earliest portrayals of actual women in the European literary tradition, and are the only such portrayals that survive from classical Athens.
Aristophanes' plays were produced for the festival theater of classical Athens in the fifth century BC and encompass the whole gamut of humor, from brilliantly inventive...
Birds is generally recognized as one of Aristophanes' masterpieces, for its imaginative plot (it is the source of the word "Cloudcuckooland"), and its charming and original lyrics.
www.alibris.com /search/books/author/aristophanes   (882 words)

  
 Aristophanes
Relatively quickly, Aristophanes' parents guided him into the lay ministry, as it was obvious that Aristophanes was quite unsuited to the traditional master/apprenticeship model of learning a trade.
Aristophanes thought that literacy was mostly a waste of time, although eventually became literate with the great encouragement from his parents.
Aristophanes and Sophokles had been wandering in Kardamyli late at night when they were jumped by a bunch of punks.
www.mit.edu /~dcltdw/RPGs/Prophecy/aristophanes.html   (867 words)

  
 Acharnians, Aristophanes Criticism and Essays
Aristophanes was cleared and further attacked Kleon in the Acharnians, in which he called Kleon a liar and a slanderer.
Presenting war as a senseless endeavor that wreaks havoc with the lives of ordinary citizens, Aristophanes savagely satirizes the selfish and ineffectual politicians who carry on with their schemes but are deaf to the pleas of their constituents.
In her discussion of the use of characters, Lois Spatz in particular emphasizes a major breakthrough: the use of a common member of the populace as hero instead of a semi-divine figure.
www.enotes.com /classical-medieval-criticism/acharnians-aristophanes   (922 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Aristophanes (Classical Literature, Biography) - Encyclopedia
Aristophanes was conservative in all things, hence he distrusted sophistry and Socrates alike, satirized Euripides' art as degenerate, and deplored the tendency to excessive imperialism that ruined Athens in the Syracusan expedition.
The typical plan of an Aristophanic comedy is simple : the protagonist undertakes seriously some preposterous project, and the play is an elaboration of his success or failure.
Aristophanes' Greek is exceptionally beautiful, and many of his choruses are among the finest lyric pieces in Greek literature.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/A/Aristph.html   (324 words)

  
 Aristophanes
All the life of Athens is there: the politics of the day and the politicians; the war party and the anti-war party; pacifism, votes for women, free trade, fiscal reform, complaining taxpayers, educational theories, the current religious and literary talk -- everything, in short, that interested the average citizen.
The resemblance between Aristophanes and certain of the comedy parts of Shakespeare jumps to the eye.
Of the Old Comedy, as it is called, we have little; none of the plays of Aristophanes' often successful rivals, and only eleven of the many he himself wrote; but the genre is clearly to be seen in those eleven.
www.english.emory.edu /DRAMA/Aristophanes.html   (949 words)

  
 Aristophanes, c.448-c.380 B.C.
Aristophanes, c.448-c.380 B.C. Aristophanes, c.448-c.380 B.C. The greatest of the Greek comic playwrights, Aristophanes ridiculed Athenian statesmen and intellectuals, censured government policies and protested against what he perceived to be the decay of Athenian values.
Aristophanes believed the ancient Athenian values of honor, duty and moderation had been destroyed by the Sophists who had come to Athens in the 5th century
It was the Athens of Marathon that Aristophanes most admired and he feared the rationalism of Euripides, the Sophists and Socrates.
www.historyguide.org /ancient/aristophanes.html   (233 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Aristophanes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Aristophanes ARISTOPHANES [Aristophanes], c.448 BC-c.388 BC, Greek playwright, Athenian comic poet, greatest of the ancient writers of comedy.
Aristophanes of Byzantium ARISTOPHANES OF BYZANTIUM [Aristophanes of Byzantium], c.257-180 BC, Greek scholar.
He won the prize at the Athenian drama contest when Aristophanes competed with The Clouds and was regarded with Aristophanes and Eupolis as one of the greatest comic dramatists.
www.encyclopedia.com /articles/00715.html   (542 words)

  
 Aristophanes Quotes - The Quotations Page
A man may learn wisdom even from a foe.
Aristophanes, Frogs, 405 B.C. You have all the characteristics of a popular politician: a horrible voice, bad breeding, and a vulgar manner.
Aristophanes, Wasps, 422 B.C. 4 Quotations in other collections
www.quotationspage.com /quotes/Aristophanes   (199 words)

  
 Aristophanes
Aristophanes goes to great effort to belittle Lamachus’ efforts and to debase him to the same level as Dicaeopolis, in order to support his hedonistic view of the world.
Aristophanes portrays the men who try to force the women out of the Acropolis as being old, bumbling and incapable of even carrying tree trunks up to the Acropolis, in order to try to break their way in.
Aristophanes uses this parallel, as in Lysistrata, to attempt to belittle the position of those that he disagrees with, but he ends up, in my opinion, coming across only spiteful and petty.
physics.usc.edu /~crathfel/aristoph.htm   (884 words)

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