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Topic: Army General Staff Identification Badge


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  Douglas MacArthur - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
President Herbert Hoover appointed MacArthur Army Chief of Staff in November 1930, with the temporary rank of (four-star) General.
In 1946, MacArthur's staff drafted a new constitution that renounced war and reduced the emperor to a mere figurehead; this Constitution is in use in Japan to this day.
Begins to develop a negative relationship with General of the Armies John Pershing, after feeling that Pershing is wasting the lives of his troops with bad military tactics.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Douglas_MacArthur   (6809 words)

  
 ARMY STAFF IDENTIFICATION BADGE INSIGNIA PAGE
 II.  SYMBOLISM:  The badge is based on the General Staff insignia with a fl star in lieu of the Silver Star.  The addition of the laurel leaves indicate achievement.
V.  SUBDUED BADGE:  The Army Staff Identification Badge is not authorized to be worn or manufactured in a subdued version.
VI.  MINIATURE BADGES:  A miniature badge with 7 stripes in the chief instead of 13 stripes and 1 ½ inches in diameter was authorized on 23 June 1989.
www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil /badges/ArmyStaffIDBadge.htm   (77 words)

  
 Antonio Taguba - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Major General Antonio M. Taguba (born October 31, 1950), became known worldwide when a classified report he wrote about cases of torture at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq was published in 2004
At Fort McPherson, Georgia, USA, he was the Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army reserve Command.
U.S. Army report on Iraqi prisoner abuse - Executive summary of Article 15-6 investigation of the 800th Military Police Brigade by Maj. Gen.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Antonio_Taguba   (540 words)

  
 Army Staff Identification Badge - Wehrmacht-Awards.com Militaria Forums
The badge is authorized for officers and enlisted personnel (Sergeant Major) and is a permanent decoration for wear subsequent to service with the General Staff.
General Douglas MacArthur first proposed an Army General Staff Badge in 1931, but it was not until 1933 that the United States War Department authorized the decoration.
The badge has remained unchanged in appearance since it was first created, however the name of the decoration was changed in 1982 from the Army General Staff Identification Badge to the Army Staff Identification Badge.
www.wehrmacht-awards.com /forums/showthread.php?t=99674   (495 words)

  
 October 19
General Franks was commissioned a second lieutenant in 1967 as a distinguished graduate of the Artillery Officer Candidate School, Fort Sill, Oklahoma.
In 1977 he was assigned to the Office of the Chief of Staff, Army where he served on the Congressional Activities Team, and then as an Executive Assistant.
In 1992, he was assigned to Fort Monroe, Virginia as the first Director, Louisiana Maneuvers Task Force, Office of Chief of Staff of the Army, a position held until 1994 when he was reassigned to Korea as the Operations Officer of Combined Forces Command and U.S. Forces Korea.
www.publicforuminstitute.org /summit/bio-franks.htm   (541 words)

  
 MG Joe W. Rigby   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Prior to assuming Command of the U.S. Army Missile Command (MICOM) on 27 July 1992, General Rigby served as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Research, Development, and Engineering at Headquarters, Army Materiel Command.
General Rigby served in a variety of important career building assignments preparatory to his most recent duties.
General Rigby has also received the Army Commendation Medal and is authorized to wear the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Parachutist Badge, the Ranger Tab, the Joint Chiefs of Staff Identification Badge, and the Army General Staff Identification Badge.
www.redstone.army.mil /history/oral/rigby.html   (379 words)

  
 JAGCNet.army.mil - Leadership-TJAG   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
General Black’s first duty assignment as a judge advocate was at Fort Bliss, Texas, where he served as the Chief of the Legal Assistance Branch, as a trial counsel and Chief of the Criminal Law Branch, and as a contract attorney.
He later served in Washington, D.C., as a general law attorney at the Office of The Judge Advocate General of the Army and as an Assistant Counsel to the President at the White House.
General Black attended the Judge Advocate Basic and Graduate courses, the Army Command and General Staff College, and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces.
jagc.army.mil /laawsxxi/jagcprofile.nsf/(JAGCNetDocID)/Leadership-TJAG   (448 words)

  
 Lieutenant General Joseph S. Laposata   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
General Laposata's contributions to the Quartermaster Corps are numerous.
General Laposata is one of the most highly decorated Quartermaster Officers in the latter 20th Century.
General Laposata was appointed by the President as Secretary of The American Battle Monuments Commission on May 17, 1994.
www.qmfound.com /LTG_Joseph_Laposata.htm   (280 words)

  
 ARMY DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF, G4 -- LTG CLAUDE V. (CHRIS) CHRISTIANSON   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Lieutenant General Claude V. (Chris) Christianson assumed his duties as the Deputy Chief of Staff, G4, Department of the Army, on October 2nd, 2003.
Lieutenant General Christianson, a Distinguished Military Graduate of the Army ROTC program at North Dakota State University was commissioned as an Ordnance Officer in 1971.
In 1993, General Christianson was assigned as the Chief of the Office of Defense Cooperation (ODC) at the American Embassy, Rome, Italy, where he served for nearly two years.
www.hqda.army.mil /logweb/LTG_Christianson.html   (545 words)

  
 J.H. Binford Peay III - SourceWatch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
J.H. Binford Peay III, General (U.S. Army, Ret.), was born in 1940.
After serving with the Army Military Personnel Center in Washington, DC, as a Field Artillery branch assignments officer, Peay was sent to Hawaii in 1975 to command the 2d Battalion, 11th Field Artillery, 25th Infantry Division.
Promoted to the rank of Lieutenant General, he was the Army's Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans, and Senior Army Member, United States Military Committee from June 1991 until March 1993.
www.sourcewatch.org /wiki.phtml?title=J.H._Binford_Peay_III   (721 words)

  
 AsianWeek   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
A lieutenant general and a brigadier general are actively serving, and a third general is going through the confirmation process and is likely to get his star in the next few weeks.
The highest-ranking APA in the U.S. Army is Lt. Gen.
Kelly Lau, a two-star general from Hawaii, is the highest-ranking APA in the Army Reserve.
www.asianweek.com /080197/news.html   (893 words)

  
 Saving Private Ryan: Army Staff Identification Badge   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
The Army Staff Identification Badge was approved for use on July 28, 1933 and later announced on August 23, 1933.
The badge is worn by officers assigned to the Army General Staff for at least one year, and to certain positions at Army Headquarters.
This badge can be seen on the coat pockets of the officers (with the exception of General Marshall) in the War Department scenes.
www.sproe.com /a/army-staff-id.html   (167 words)

  
 Vigen, Oscar   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Fairfax, Va. - Oscar Vigen, Lt. Col., U.S. Army, retired, died Sunday, September 24, 2000 at Fairfax (Va.) Hospital at the age of 79.
He was active in the local 4-H and as a high school senior won highest honors at the Minnesota State Fair.
His unit was one of the first to enter Japan immediately after its surrender as a member of the Occupation Forces.
www.trftimes.com /obits/Vigen_Oscar.htm   (501 words)

  
 Tommy Franks Biography - Commander in Chief
He was the U.S. general leading the attack on the Taliban in Afghanistan in response to the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center and The Pentagon.
In 1977 he was assigned to the Office of the Chief of Staff, Army where he served on the Congressional Activities Team, and subsequently as an Executive Assistant.
In 1992, he was assigned to Fort Monroe, Virginia as the first Director, Louisiana Maneuvers Task Force, Office of Chief of Staff of the Army, a position held until 1994 when he was reassigned to South Korea as the CJG3 of Combined Forces Command and U.S. Forces Korea.
www.quotemonk.com /authors/tommy-franks/biography-profile.htm   (770 words)

  
 A moment of silence please, a Hero has passed. - The REAL POLICE Forum
Retired Army Col. David H. Hackworth, 74, a highly decorated soldier's soldier who as a writer often went to war with "the perfumed princes" of the Pentagon and with a military establishment he considered obtuse and ineffective, died May 4 in Tijuana, Mexico, where he was receiving treatment for bladder cancer.
In 1945, at age 14, he used phony identification papers to join the Merchant Marine; at 15, he enlisted in the Army and fought with Yugoslav partisans on the Italian border.
He was forced to resign from the Army before he could be court-martialed or, as he maintained in his memoir, assassinated.
forums.realpolice.net /showthread.php?t=32942   (1739 words)

  
 MG August M. Cianciolo
General Cianciolo's early service career began at Ft. Sill where he served as a Platoon Leader for Battery C, 3rd Observation Battalion, 25th Artillery.
Prior to serving as the Commanding General of the U.S. Army Missile Command (MICOM), General Cianciolo held a wide variety of important command and staff positions.
If there was a central thrust, at least a point of immediacy that had to take place was finishing the transition of the PEO concept and the Matrix Management concept——the Army acquisition executive side of the house and the Army materiel side of the house.
www.redstone.army.mil /history/oral/cianciolo.html   (3107 words)

  
 Association of the United States Army: Lt. Gen. "Roy" Thurman to be Buried July 6 at Arlington   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
His next assignment was aide-de-camp to the X Corps commander in Korea in February 1952 and from there returned to Washington as a staff officer in the Office, Assistant Chief of Staff G4, Department of the Army.
Thurman held the glider badge, Office of Secretary of Defense Identification Badge and the United States Army General Staff Identification Badge.
Thurman’s professional military education included the command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kan.; Armed Forces Staff College, Norfolk, Va.; and the Naval War College, Newport, R.I. Thurman also was awarded a Master of Science degree from the George Washington University.
www.ausa.org /WEBINT/DeptHome.nsf/byid/CTON-6FUT24   (792 words)

  
 SMDC will have new commander soon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Edward G. Anderson III, current commander of the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command, or SMDC, for reappointment to the grade of lieutenant general and assignment as director, Strategic Plans and Policy, J-5, Joint Staff, the Pentagon, Washington, D.C. Anderson has been the commanding general of SMDC since Oct. 7, 1996.
John Costello for appointment to the grade of lieutenant general and assignment as the commanding general of SMDC.
In addition, he received a master’s degree in foreign affairs from the University of Virginia and a master of military arts and science degree from the Command and General Staff College and is a graduate of the Program for Senior Executives in National and International Security, JFK School of Government, Harvard University.
www.fas.org /news/usa/1998/07/980727-smdc.htm   (421 words)

  
 Oscar Clarence Vigen, Lieutenant Colonel, United States Army
Colonel Vigen retired from the Army in 1968 after serving in the office of the Army's chief of research and development.
He graduated from the Army's Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. His military decorations included a Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, two Purple Hearts and the Combat Infantryman's Badge.
He was a 1957 graduate of the Command and General Staff College at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas; a 1953 graduate of the officer's advance course of The Armored School in Fort Knox, Kentucky; and a 1961 graduate of the Army Management School at Fort Belvoir, Virginia.
www.arlingtoncemetery.net /ocvigen.htm   (921 words)

  
 August 3, 1968
General Williamson was born in Raeford, North Carolina on June 2, 1918.
He graduated from the Command and General Staff College in 1950 and was assigned to Headquarter X Corps in Korea.
General Williamson was assigned in 1952, to the Office of the Army Chief of Staff, next attended the Armed Forces Staff College, and then returned to Washington for duty in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.
www.25thida.com /TLN/tln3-sp.htm   (688 words)

  
 Army Staff Identification Badge | WesPAC
General Douglas McArthur proposed the Army General Staff in 1931, but it was not authorized until 1933.
Although the look remains the same today, the name was changed in 1982 to the Army Staff Identification Badge.
It is awarded to officers and enlisted personnel (in a paygrade of E-9) who serve for one year as a member of the Army General Staff.
securingamerica.com /node/797   (217 words)

  
 Harding University - News & Events
A lifelong military career prepared Franks, a highly decorated four-star general, for the command of his life - leading a coalition of more than 60 nations to victory in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
In 1969 he was selected to participate in the Army’s Degree Completion Program and subsequently received a degree in business administration from the University of Texas, Arlington in 1971.
Upon his return to the United States in 1984, he attended the Army War College at Carlisle, Pa., where he also completed graduate studies and received a master of science degree in public administration at Shippensburg University.
www.harding.edu /NEWS_2004/news_Franks.html   (540 words)

  
 US Army Community and Family Support Center
Pinckney is a two-way pioneer in Army Morale, Welfare and Recreation leadership.
As the 14th commander in 22 years of the CFSC, she is the first woman and the first African-American to command the organization located in Alexandria, Va.
Macdonald, who served 16 months as commanding general at CFSC, is the new director of the Installation Management Agency, based in Arlington.
www.armymwr.com /corporate/news/display.asp?NEWS_ID=725   (713 words)

  
 • Division Chief   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Previous to the NATO assignment, he was Military Secretary/Chief, Management Division, Strategic Plans and Policy Directorate, J-5, Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Pentagon.
Previous to the JCS assignment, he was a student at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces (ICAF), Fort McNair, Washington, D.C. Prior to ICAF, he served as Commander, U.S. Army Publications Distribution Center, Saint Louis, Missouri.
Olson served as Conference Team Chief, Office of the Chief of Staff, Army, Washington D.C. managing conferences for the Secretary and Chief of Staff Army.
www.ima.army.mil /sites/hr/biohrchief.asp   (309 words)

  
 Lt. Gen. Costello becomes new SMDC commander   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
In an Oct. 1 military ceremony in the Pentagon office of Gen. Dennis J. Reimer, Army chief of staff, Maj. Gen.
John Costello was promoted to the rank of lieutenant general and assumed command of the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command.
Costello comes to SMDC from Fort Bliss, Texas, where he was the commander of the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss.
www.smdc.army.mil /pubaff/97_98Press/Commander.html   (159 words)

  
 [No title]
The dress uniform badge is 1 1/2" in size.
The Army Staff Identification Badge is a decoration of the United States Army and is awarded to those personnel who serve for one year as a member of the Army General Staff.
The badge is authorized for officers and enlisted personnel (in the paygrade of E-9) and is considered a permanent decoration for wear subsequent to service with the General Staff.
www.uniforms-4u.com /p_army_staff_badge_3621.aspx   (212 words)

  
 statement by MG Ellis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
This was accomplished through a series of exercises and staff training events that culminate with a division-level evaluated exercise in March 1999.
In particular, command and control communications, internal and external staff coordination, and integration of all elements of direct and indirect fire in support of the deep battle require training and exercise opportunities which are not and cannot be achieved concurrently with peacekeeping operations.
The exercise platform for BCTP is the Warfighter exercise (WFX), which emphasizes the execution of battle staff operations during all phases of combat and incorporates brigade-level exercises.
www.house.gov /hasc/testimony/106thcongress/99-03-08ellis.htm   (4297 words)

  
 UTEP Celebrates Homecoming 2003- Honors Outstanding Alumni-
Green entered the service in 1969 as an infantry private, graduated from Officer Candidate School and was commissioned as an infantry lieutenant in 1971.
Green attended the National War College, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, the Air Defense Artillery Office Advanced Course and numerous other military schools.
In 2001, Green was honored in UTEP’s Department of Military Science, which dedicated the Army ROTC Hall of Fame and inducted its first honorees that year.
www.utep.edu /newspubs/Releases/Oct03/da.html   (765 words)

  
 DefenseLINK News: CENTCOM's Gen. Franks Plans to Retire
The general has commanded the coalition actions in Afghanistan and in Iraq.
Franks, from Midland, Texas, was commissioned a second lieutenant in 1967 via Field Artillery Officer Candidate School, Fort Sill, Okla. He served with the 9th Infantry Division, Republic of Vietnam, as a forward observer for the 2nd Battalion, 4th Field Artillery.
In 1969, he was selected to participate in the Army's Boot Strap Degree Completion Program, and subsequently attended the University of Texas at Arlington, where he graduated with a bachelor's degree in business administration in 1971.
globalsecurity.org /military/library/news/2003/05/mil-030523-afps01.htm   (337 words)

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