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Topic: Arthur Currie


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  Sir Arthur Currie - LoveToKnow 1911
He gained the confidence of the English military authorities in the field, and when Lord Byng resigned his command of the Canadian troops Sir Arthur Currie was the one Canadian to whom it was felt by the British Headquarters that the command could be entrusted.
Currie was given the C.B. in 1915, K.C.M.G. 1918 and G.C.M.G. 1919; he was awarded the French Legion of Honour and the Croix de Guerre both of France and of Belgium, and was created Grand Officer of the Belgian Ordre de la Couronne.
In 1920, after Sir Auckland Geddes had finally declined the nomination to the principalship of McGill University, Montreal, on his appointment as British ambassador to Washington, Sir Arthur Currie was elected to the post.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Sir_Arthur_Currie   (211 words)

  
 Arthur Currie - Definition, explanation
Arthur Currie was born in Napperton, Ontario and attended Strathroy Collegiate Institute in Strathroy, Ontario.
Currie was often vehemently opposed to General Douglas Haig, the senior British commander who was his superior officer and who had the overall command of the British, Canadian, and other colonial troops.
Currie was respected by his soldiers as a competent general who would not waste their lives needlessly, but he was not well-liked as he was considered too arrogant.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/a/ar/arthur_currie.php   (958 words)

  
  Arthur Currie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Currie was among the most successful generals of the war; he is still considered one of the finest commanders in Canadian military history.
Arthur Currie was born in Napperton, Ontario and attended Strathroy Collegiate Institute in Strathroy, Ontario.
Currie sued the newspaper for libel and won the case in a trial held in 1928 in Cobourg, Ontario.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Arthur_Currie   (999 words)

  
 Arthur Currie Summary
Arthur Currie was born at Napperton, Ontario, on Dec. 5, 1875, and he was educated in the public schools of Strathroy.
Currie was among the most successful generals of the war; he is still considered one of the finest commanders in Canadian military history.
Currie was knighted in 1917, and also honoured with the British Knight Commander Order of the Bath, Knight GRAND CROSS of the Order of St. Michael and St. George, the French Légion d'honneur and Croix de Guerre, and the U.S. Distinguished Service Medal.
www.bookrags.com /Arthur_Currie   (1309 words)

  
 peoplearthurcurrie   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Arthur Currie, a real estate dealer from Victoria, British Columbia, began the war with no military experience other than that gained in the Militia, where he had served as commander of the 50th Highlanders.
Sir Arthur Currie was to prove a leader of great courage, coolness, skill and ability, with a fine sense of tactics.
Currie went on to serve as Inspector General of the Canadian Militia Forces (a post he found disappointing) and later as Vice Chancellor of McGill University, a position which he held with distinction until his death in 1933.
www.canadahistory.ca /vimy/people/peoplearthurcurrie.htm   (321 words)

  
 Sir Arthur W. Currie
Arthur William Currie was born in Strathroy, Ontario.
Currie so impressed his peers that in 1914 he was selected by the Minister of Militia, Colonel Sam Hughes, to command an Infantry Brigade in the 1 st Canadian Division.
Currie was knighted by H.M. King George V in 1917 and was honoured by the Governments of France, Belgium and the United States.
www.5rcamuseum.ca /id35.htm   (286 words)

  
 essays research papers - Sir Arthur Currie
Arthur William Currie was born on December 5th, 1875 Napperton, Ontario, where he attended Strathroy Collegiate Institute.
Before beginning a successful military career, Currie moved to Victoria, British Columba (1895), where he was a school teacher, a real estate agent, as well as an insurance broker.
Currie and other commanders realized that since the wind was in the Germans’ favour, the only clean air would be near the German front lines.
www.123helpme.com /view.asp?id=85982   (649 words)

  
 Sir Arthur Currie
General Sir Arthur William Currie (December 5, 1875 - November 30, 1933) was the commander of the Canadian army during World War I. Arthur Currie was born in Napperton, Ontario, and became a teacher in nearby Strathroy, Ontario.
Currie was respected as a competent general by his men, but he was not well-liked, as he was considered to be too arrogant.
Currie also refused to allow his former friend Garnet Hughes to serve under him, because of what Currie perceived to be incompetence when they fought together in at Ypres in 1915.
www.world-war-1.info /figures/sir-arthur-currie.php   (611 words)

  
 First World War.com - Who's Who - Sir Arthur Currie
General Sir Arthur William Currie (1875-1933), despite a popular reputation among his troops as 'Guts and Gaiters' (on account of his supposedly aloof manner), was a capable Canadian army commander who enjoyed a consistently successful run of victories throughout the war.
Again impressing with his sure-footed command and meticulous attention to detail, Currie was promoted GOC Canadian Corps with the elevation of Sir Julian Byng to command of Third Army in June 1917.
Following the war Currie served as inspector general of the Canadian militia and, from 1920 as Principal and Vice Chancellor of McGill University until his death on 30 November 1933.
www.firstworldwar.com /bio/currie.htm   (427 words)

  
 Arthur Currie information - Search.com
Currie was among the most successful Allied generals of the war; he is still considered one of the finest commanders in Canadian military history.
Currie was often vehemently opposed to General Douglas Haig, the senior British commander who was his superior officer and who had the overall command of the British, the Canadians, and the other colonial troops of the Empire.
Currie, along with General John Monash of Australia, were both civilians who during the War rose to lead their respective armies.
www.search.com /reference/Sir_Arthur_Currie   (1031 words)

  
 Slashdoc - War Strategies of Sir Arthur Currie
Sir Arthur Currie was not a man raised to become a great general, he had to start from the beginning and work his way to the top.
Arthur Currie’s greatest contributions to this battle were suggestions which significantly accounted for the surprise attack that subsequently led to victory (Hyatt, 1987).
Currie sent two infantry battalions north to Vimy in order to set up headquarters, where the signallers delivered phoney wireless messages to fool the enemy into thinking the Allies were moving north to Flanders (Hyatt, 1987).
www.slashdoc.com /documents/35083   (1433 words)

  
 Untitled Document
Arthur Drummond was the son of Arthur Currie, a very wealthy Magistrate and Distiller, of 12 Cavendish Square, London, and of The High Elms Estate near Watford.
Their only child, Arthur Henry Augustus, was born the next year, on 10th December 1874, at Milford, Pembrokeshire, when Currie's UK address was Connaught Place, Hyde Park, London.
His son, Arthur Henry Augustus, was educated at Radley School and Brasenose College, Oxford, where, in 1899, he had graduated with a B.A. in Law.
www.martley.org.uk /people/colcurrie.htm   (908 words)

  
 currie
General Sir Arthur William Currie (1875-1933), despite a popular reputation among his troops as 'Guts and Gaiters' (on account of his supposedly aloof manner), was a capable Canadian army commander who enjoyed a consistently successful run of victories throughout the war.
Following the war Currie served as inspector general of the Canadian militia and, from 1920 as Principal and Vice Chancellor of McGill University until his death on 30 November 1933.
In his appeal Currie stated that the fate of the British Empire was currently in the balance on account of the German-launched offensive along the Lys valley; consequently he called upon his men - about to enter the battle - to fight ever harder to defeat German forces presently in the ascendant.
users.telenet.be /sbt-ypers/currie.html   (736 words)

  
 Arthur Currie - Search Results - MSN Encarta   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Arthur Currie - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Arthur, mythical king of the Britons in ancient times, and the major figure in Arthurian legend.
Arthur (motion picture), comedy about a millionaire’s unmarried son who spends his days drinking, riding around in a limousine, and looking for...
encarta.msn.com /Arthur_Currie.html   (114 words)

  
 First World War.com - Primary Documents - Sir Arthur Currie on the Lys Offensive, April 1918
Reproduced below is the text of an appeal issued by Sir Arthur Currie to the Canadian Corps he commanded in April 1918.
In his appeal Currie stated that the fate of the British Empire was currently in the balance on account of the German-launched offensive along the Lys valley; consequently he called upon his men - about to enter the battle - to fight ever harder to defeat German forces presently in the ascendant.
Intended by Erich Ludendorff as a means of weakening and confusing the Allies the German attack along the Lys valley, launched on 9 April 1918, attained such startlingly effective initial results that Ludendorff took the decision to convert the effort into a full-scale offensive against British forces stationed there.
www.firstworldwar.com /source/lys_currie.htm   (439 words)

  
 Arthur Currie | World War I Canadian General Arthur Currie
When WWI started in 1914, Currie was given command of the first Canadian unit to assist Britain.
Currie was put in command of four divisions and replaced British General Sir Julian Byng.
It was Currie's warfare theories that literally won WWI for the allies.
deena.ca /currie_arthur.html   (207 words)

  
 Macdonald Park, Percival Molson Stadium, Sir Arthur Currie Memorial Gymnasium, and McConnell Winter Stadium
The three buildings that currently serve McGill's athletic needs are all located in Macdonald Park, an area of land bounded on the south by Pine Avenue, on the west by University Street, and to the north and east by Mount Royal.
In 1939, the Sir Arthur Currie Memorial Gymnasium-Armoury was constructed on the north side of Pine Avenue, just east of University Street.
Sir Arthur Currie, for whom the gym was named, had been a highly-decorated general in World War I, after which he became principal of McGill from 1920 to 1933, the year of his death.
cac.mcgill.ca /campus/buildings/Gym.html   (495 words)

  
 Slashdoc - General Sir Arthur Currie
One of Currie’s first moves was to assign intelligence officers to the various headquarters with which the Canadian Corps would be associated: Second Army, II Anzac Corps, which was responsible for the sector the Canadians would be taking over, and its front-line divisions, the New Zealand and 3rd Australian.
Currie late recounted there meeting: It was then I learned for the first time the true proportions of the mutiny in the French Army in 1917 and the strength of the Peace party in France and also in England in that year.
Whether or not Sir Arthur Currie could have been a successful commander in chief of the BEF is a matter of speculation.
www.slashdoc.com /documents/35375   (1749 words)

  
 Flit
Sir Arthur William Currie (1875-1933): For those who don't know the name, and there are many, many Canadians who do not, Currie commanded the Canadian Corps from mid-1917 to the end of the First World War.
Currie's greatest strength and greatest flaw was he was not at all diplomatic.
Currie had sued the first paper to run the allegations in 1927 (first made by controversial Canadian soldier-politician Sam Hughes, who disliked Currie because he had passed over his son for promotion, among other things, and who by that stage of his life was, in retrospect, quite mad).
www.snappingturtle.net /flit/archives/2004_10_18.html   (4177 words)

  
 Sir Arthur Currie Grave, Montreal, 1988
As a child in Calgary, Alberta, I was aware of Currie Barracks located then on Calgary's southwestern outskirts, but I did not know the source of name of this military base.
The Calgary military base was, of course named after Sir Arthur Currie who was Canada's senior general in WWI.
Currie Barracks will soon be gone from Calgary as our federal government has in 1997 moved out the last of our regular force troops to the Edmonton vicinity, our neighbouring city in the north.
www.harrypalmergallery.ab.ca /galwartom/currie.html   (149 words)

  
 Currie, Sir Arthur William - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
CURRIE, SIR ARTHUR WILLIAM [Currie, Sir Arthur William] 1875-1933, Canadian commander in World War I. He made a distinguished record for himself in World War I as a brigade and division commander, particularly at Ypres (1915) and Vimy Ridge (1917), where he was knighted on the battlefield.
Promoted to lieutenant general, he commanded the Canadian Corps, which played key roles in the assaults on the Amiens salient and the Hindenburg Line, from June, 1917, until the end of the war.
Find newspaper and magazine articles plus images and maps related to "Currie, Sir Arthur William" at HighBeam.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-currie-s1.html   (234 words)

  
 Currie, Sir Arthur William
France 1917 — Canadian General Arthur Currie leads Allied forces to Canada's most significant victory of World War I. More
On Easter Monday, four Canadian divisions and one British brigade captured Vimy...
D.G. Dancocks, Legacy of Valour: The Canadians at Passchendaele (1986); A.M.J. Hyatt, General Sir Arthur Currie (1987); H.M. Urquhart, Arthur Currie (1950).
www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0002084SUBReadings   (72 words)

  
 Anecdotage.Com - Thousands of true funny stories about famous people. Anecdotes from Gates to Yeats
On one occasion, Currie was the final speaker in a closely fought debate and was allowed 5 minutes to conclude his team's argument.
But Currie knew that under a strict interpretation of the rules he could finish his sentence before sitting down.
So he left the stage and slowly circumambulated the auditorium before returning, finally, to his seat, with 'slow, short, and deliberate steps' and 'shooting arguments like bullets.' He concluded his last point at the very moment his posterior was reunited with the chair.
www.anecdotage.com /index.php?aid=14556   (215 words)

  
 Battle of the Last 100 Days
The Canadians expected to be next, as the British forces to their left and the French to their right had already been pushed back.
Haig desired the Canadians to work as a part of the British line in a defensive manner but was swayed by Currie to have the Canadians go on the offensive.
Hindsight after the war -- and a serious infusion of bitter and small minded slander on the part of Sam Hughes and his followers - have soiled the decision of Arthur Currie and the Canadian forces to take the city at such a late hour.
pages.interlog.com /~fatjack/last100days.htm   (1799 words)

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