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Topic: Articles of Confederation


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  Articles of Confederation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document of the United States of America.
The articles, which combined the Thirteen Colonies of the American Revolutionary War into a loose confederation, were adopted by the Second Continental Congress on November 15, 1777, after 16 months of debate.
The "president" under the Articles was the presiding officer of Congress, not the chief executive, as is the President of the United States under the Constitution.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Articles_of_Confederation   (2116 words)

  
 Articles of Confederation - MSN Encarta
The Articles were in force from March 1, 1781, to June 21, 1788, when the present Constitution of the United States went into effect.
The Articles were written in 1777 during the early part of the American Revolution by a committee of the Second Continental Congress of the 13 colonies.
The greatest weakness of the federal government under the Articles of Confederation was its inability to regulate trade and levy taxes.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761567227/Articles_of_Confederation.html   (994 words)

  
 Articles of Confederation
Canada acceding to this confederation, and joining in the measures of the united states, shall be admitted into, and entitled to all the advantages of this union: but no other colony shall be admitted into the same, unless such admis- sion be agreed to by nine states.
And that the articles thereof shall be inviolably observed by the states we re- spectively represent, and that the union shall be perpetual.
The proceedings of this day with respect to the signing of the Articles of Confederation, the Articles themselves and the signers are entered in the "Papers of the Continental Congress, No. 9 (History of the Confederation)", but not in the Journal itself.
members.tripod.com /~Autarchic/files/articles.html   (740 words)

  
 Confederation, Articles of - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Confederation, Articles of   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Ratified in 1781, the articles established a unicameral legislature, Congress, with limited powers of raising revenue, regulating currency, and conducting foreign affairs.
The articles were superseded by the US Constitution, ratified in 1788.
The Articles of Confederation did maintain the union of states during the American Revolution and, to their credit, enacted the Northwest Ordinance (1787), which among other measures, guaranteed freedom of religion and prohibited slavery in the new territory.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Confederation,%20Articles%20of   (193 words)

  
 The Critical Period: America in the 1780s
Article 2 stated that "each State retains its sovereignty, freedom and independence, and every power...which is not...expressly delegated to the United States...." Any amendment required unanimous consent of the states.
The Articles of Confederation created a national government composed of a Congress, which had the power to declare war, appoint military officers, sign treaties, make alliances, appoint foreign ambassadors, and manage relations with Indians.
It is noteworthy that the Confederation Congress could not muster a quorum to ratify on time the treaty that guaranteed American independence, nor could it pay the expense of sending the ratified treaty back to Europe.
www.hfac.uh.edu /gl/critical2.htm   (337 words)

  
 The Articles of Confederation - TEXT VERSION
ARTICLE I The Stile of this Confederacy shall be "The United States of America".
Canada acceding to this confederation, and adjoining in the measures of the United States, shall be admitted into, and entitled to all the advantages of this Union; but no other colony shall be admitted into the same, unless such admission be agreed to by nine States.
The aforefaid articles of confederation were finally ratified on the firft day of March 1781; the state of Maryland having, by their Members in Congrefs, on that day acceded thereto, and completed the fame.
www.earlyamerica.com /earlyamerica/milestones/articles/text.html   (567 words)

  
 Articles of Confederation: Primary Documents of American History (Virtual Programs & Services, Library of Congress)
The Journals of the Continental Congress contain the first draft of the Articles of Confederation as presented to the Continental Congress on July 12, 1776.
However, it was not until Maryland's approval on March 1, 1781 that the Articles of Confederation were finally ratified by all the states.
Elliot's Debates provides a summary of the ratification process for the Articles of Confederation, a transcript of Thomas Jefferson's notes of debate on confederation, and another copy of the Articles.
www.loc.gov /rr/program/bib/ourdocs/articles.html   (769 words)

  
 Constitutional Topic: Articles of Confederation - The U.S. Constitution Online - USConstitution.net
The Articles of Confederation is the document that was the basis for the United States Government prior to that established in the Constitution.
Article 2 ensures that each state is a free and sovereign state, and establishes that any power not granted the federal government is reserved for the States.
Article 7 ensures that all officers in the militia placed in national service, at or under the rank of colonel, will be appointed by the state.
www.usconstitution.net /consttop_arti.html   (1660 words)

  
 Ben's Guide (3-5): The Articles of Confederation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
In its final form, the Articles of Confederation were comprised of a preamble and 13 articles.
The Articles of Confederation were finally ratified by the last of the 13 American states, Maryland, in 1781 and became the ruling document in the new nation.
In the words of George Washington, the government created by the Articles of the Confederation was "little more than the shadow without the substance." As the need for a stronger federal government began to be realized, leaders from throughout the states got together to decide how to create it.
bensguide.gpo.gov /3-5/documents/articles   (260 words)

  
 MILESTONE HISTORIC DOCUMENTS - THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION
Afraid that their individual needs would be ignored by a national government with too much power, and the abuses that often result from such power, the Articles purposely established a "constitution" that vested the largest share of power to the individual states.
nder the Articles each of the states retained their "sovereignty, freedom and independence." Instead of setting up executive and judicial branches of government, there was a committee of delegates composed of representatives from each state.
But during those years in which the 13 states were struggling to achieve their independent status, the Articles of Confederation stood them in good stead.
www.earlyamerica.com /earlyamerica/milestones/articles   (286 words)

  
 The Articles of Confederation - 1777
The Articles were written during the early part of the American Revolution by a committee of the Second Continental Congress of the now independent thirteen sovereign states.
During those years the 13 states were struggling to achieve their independent status, and the Articles of Confederation stood them in good stead in the process and exercise of learning self-government.
The Articles of Confederation afforded such freedoms that he had become convinced that even with the incumbent loss of liberty, some new form of government would be required.
www.barefootsworld.net /aoc1777.html   (8022 words)

  
 National Park Service: A Multitude of Amendments, Alterations and Additions   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
With the preliminary modifications made to the Articles, Congress ordered that eighty copies of the Articles of Confederation, as reported from the committee of the whole, be printed under the same injunctions as the former articles were printed, and delivered to the members under the like restrictions as formerly.(44)
Subsequently, consideration of the Articles was tabled until 8 April 1777, when it was decided that two days a week would be devoted to discussion of the Articles.
The printed copies of the Articles of Confederation, in the form of a twenty-six page pamphlet, were delivered to the president of Congress on 28 November.
www.cr.nps.gov /history/online_books/dube/inde3.htm   (921 words)

  
 Today in History: November 15
Article II, Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union.
Submitted to the states for ratification two days later, the Articles of Confederation were accompanied by a letter from Congress urging that the document
The section Religion and the Congress of the Confederation, 1774-89 examines the importance of religion to the men governing the United States from 1774 to 1789.
memory.loc.gov /ammem/today/nov15.html   (778 words)

  
 About the Articles of Confederation (1776)
The Articles also specified that no state could be deprived of territory for the benefit of the country and that all 13 states had to agree to any amendment of the federal government's power.
The Articles of Confederation became the ruling document in the new nation after they were ratified by the last of the 13 American states, Maryland, in 1781.
The Articles created a nation that was “a league of friendship and perpetual union.” The state governments retained most of the power under this framework, with a subordinate position given to the central government.
www.factmonster.com /ipka/A0877703.html   (568 words)

  
 Articles of Confederation DBQ   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Articles of Confederation drafted by John Dickinson in 1776, during the 2nd Continental Congress, was ratified on March 1, 1781, by the thirteen states.
Under the Articles of Confederation the Congress had no power to tax the states, instead it depended on donations by the states.
Despite, success in expansion policies, The Articles of Confederation was a failure in creating a prosperous and efficacious country that could support and defend itself and its people.
www.geocities.com /CapitolHill/Lobby/1777/papers/haofdbq.html   (777 words)

  
 The Avalon Project : Journals of the Continental Congress - Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union; July 12, 1776
Articles of confederation and perpetual union, between the colonies of (1)
Canada acceding to this Confederation, and entirely joining in the Measures of the United Colonies, shall be admitted into and entitled to all the Advantages of this Union: But no other Colony shall be admitted into the same, unless such Admission be agreed to by the Delegates of nine Colonies.
This since forms Part of the 5th Article of the Confederation as agreed to by all the States, except Maryland,-on the 9th July 1778:-and finally ratified by the whole Union, on the 1st March 1781.-(the State of Maryland acceding thereto)" William Temple Franklin, on original manuscript.
www.yale.edu /lawweb/avalon/contcong/07-12-76.htm   (1948 words)

  
 Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation were agreed upon by the Continental Congress on November 15, 1777.
Because they were articles of confederation, it was necessary for each of the thirteen states to ratify the Articles.
As a result, the Articles of Confederation did not become binding upon the states until March 1, 1781.
www.michaelariens.com /ConLaw/articles.htm   (830 words)

  
 Articles Of Confederation November I5, 1777 To all to whom these Presents shall come, we the undersigned Delegates of ...
Articles Of Confederation November I5, 1777 To all to whom these Presents shall come, we the undersigned Delegates of the States affixed to our Names send greeting.
ARTICLE I. THE stile of this confederacy shall be " The United States of America." ARTICLE II.
ARTICLE I. THE stile of this confederacy shall be " The United States of America."
www.multied.com /documents/ArticleofConfederation.html   (1304 words)

  
 Articles of Confederation
Articles of Confederation: Bibliography - Bibliography See A. Nevins, The American States during and after the Revolution, 1775–1789...
Articles of Confederation: Shortcomings - Shortcomings While this constitution was a contribution to the techniques of government and a step...
Articles of Confederation: The Articles - The Articles The preamble and Article 1 established a perpetual union of the Thirteen Colonies...
www.factmonster.com /ce6/history/A0813198.html   (300 words)

  
 Articles of Confederation. 1909-14. American Historical Documents, 1000-1904. The Harvard Classics
Each State retains its sovereignty, freedom and independence, and every power, jurisdiction and right, which is not by this confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled.
No two or more States shall enter into any treaty, confederation or alliance whatever between them, without the consent of the United States in Congress assembled, specifying accurately the purposes for which the same is to be entered into, and how long it shall continue.
And that the articles thereof shall be inviolably observed by the States we respectively represent, and that the Union shall be perpetual.
www.bartleby.com /43/16.html   (822 words)

  
 Edusolution.com - Articles of Confederation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
After much debate and discussion, the Articles of Confederation, the nation's first constitution, came into effect in March 1781.
From the outset, however, the Articles was very weak and lacked the necessary powers needed to run the new country effectively.
From the chart, you can see that the Articles was indeed very weak; it did not establish institutions such as a presidency or a court system which are essential for governing a country.
edusolution.com /myclassroom/classnotes/articles/articles.htm   (342 words)

  
 Congress for Kids
The Continental Congress wrote the Articles of Confederation during the Revolutionary War.
The articles were written to give the colonies some sense of a unified government.
The Articles of Confederation became effective on March 1, 1781, after all thirteen states had ratified them.
congressforkids.net /Independence_articles.htm   (149 words)

  
 Articles of Confederation, Constitution Day Materials, Pocket Constitution Book, US Constitution, Bill of Rights   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
While the Articles of Confederation was a plan of government based upon the principles fought for in the American Revolutionary War, it contained crucial flaws.
The Articles of Confederation’s greatest weakness, however, was that it had no direct origin in the people themselves–it knew only state sovereignty.
The Articles of Confederation served as a “transition” between the Revolutionary War and the Constitution.
www.constitutionfacts.com /articles_confed/articles.htm   (830 words)

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