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Topic: Asopus


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In the News (Sun 16 Jun 19)

  
  Asopus
Asopus is the son of Oceanus and Tethys.
When his daughter was abducted by Zeus, he persued them but Zeus drove him back with thunderbolts.
Article "Asopus" created on 03 March 1997; last modified on 04 February 1999 (Revision 2).
www.pantheon.org /articles/a/asopus.html   (55 words)

  
  Asopus -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Asopus or Asôpos is the name of five different rivers in (A republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil) Greece and also in (The mythology of the ancient Greeks) Greek mythology the name of the gods of those rivers.
Thessalian Asopus, a river rising in Mt. Oeta in (A fertile plain on the Aegean Sea in east central Greece; Thessaly was a former region of ancient Greece) Thessaly and emptying into the Sinus Maliacus.
Oroe, a tributary river of Boeotian Asopus is called by (The ancient Greek known as the father of history; his accounts of the wars between the Greeks and Persians are the first known examples of historical writing (425-485 BC)) Herodotus (9.51.2) and Pausanias (9.4.4) daughter of Asopus.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/A/As/Asopus.htm   (1144 words)

  
 Asopus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Asopus or Asôpos is the name of five different rivers in Greece and also in Greek mythology the name of the gods of those rivers.
Asopus cannot discover what has become of them until the seer Acraephen (otherwise unknown) tells him that Eros and Aphrodite persuaded the four gods to come secretly to his house and steal his nine daughters.
Asopus chases after Zeus and his daughter until Zeus turns upon him and strikes him with a thunderbolt, whence ever after Asopus is lame and flows very slowly, a feature ascribed to both the Boeotian and Phliasian Asopus.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Asopus   (1219 words)

  
 Asopus
Asopus or Asôpos is the name of five different rivers in Greece and also in Greek mythology the name of the gods of those rivers.
Asopus chases after Zeus and his daughter until Zeus turns upon him and strikes him with a thunderbolt, whence ever after Asopus is lame and flows very slowly, a feature ascribed to both the Boeotian and Phliasian Asopus.
Pausanias (2.5.2) mentionins three supposed daughters of Phliasian Asopus named Corcyra, Aegina, and Thebe according to the Phliasians and further notes that the Thebans insist that this Thebe was daughter of the Boeotian Asopus.
www.mlahanas.de /Greeks/Mythology/Asopus.html   (1266 words)

  
 Asopus - Wikipedia
Asopus is een figuur uit de Griekse mythologie.
Toen Asopus zijn dochter overal zocht, openbaarde Sisyphus hem eindelijk, wie haar had weggeroofd.
Asopus vervolgde daarom Zeus en streed met hem, totdat Zeus hem versloeg met zijn bliksem, waardoor hij in zijn bedding werd teruggedreven.
nl.wikipedia.org /wiki/Asopus   (134 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 386 (v. 1)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Aegina was one of the daughters of Asopus, and Pindar mentions a river of this name in Aegina.
When Zeus had carried off his daughter Aegina, and Asopus had searched after her everywhere, he was at last informed by Sisyphus of Corinth, that Zeus was the guilty party.
Asopus now revolted against Zeus, and wanted to fight with him, but Zeus struck him with his thunderbolt and confined him to his original bed.
ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/0395.html   (891 words)

  
 Asopus: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Asopus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Asopus: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Asopus
A river-god in Greek mythology, Asopus ("never silent") was one of the three-thousand children of Oceanus and Tethys, and father of Aegina.
When his daughter was abducted by Zeus, Asopus attempted to rescue her.
www.encyclopedian.com /as/Asopus.html   (123 words)

  
 Asopus - Acadine Archive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Asopus was a river-god, son of Poseidon and Pero, or Oceanus and Tethys.
By his union with Metope, daughter of the river-god Ladon, he had many daugh­ters, one of whom, Aegion, was carried off by Zeus.
Asopus pursued them, but was smitten by Zeus with a thunderbolt, which filled the river bed with charcoal.
www.acadine.org /w/Asopus   (85 words)

  
 RIVER GODS, Greek Mythology Link.
Asopus married Metope 1, daughter of the river god Ladon 1.
In search of his daughter Aegina, who had been carried off, Asopus came to Corinth and learned from Sisyphus that the ravisher was Zeus.
Asopus pursued him, but Zeus, by hurling thunderbolts, sent him away to his own streams.
homepage.mac.com /cparada/GML/RIVERGODS.html   (2326 words)

  
 Asopus
Several of these daughters of Asopus were carried off by gods, which is commonly believed to indicate the colonies established by the people inhabiting the banks of the Asopus, who also transferred the name of Asopus to other rivers in the countries where they settled.
Aegina was one of the daughters of Asopus, and Pindar mentions a river of this name in Aegina.
Asopus now revolted against Zeus, and wanted to fight with him, but Zeus struck him with his thunderbolt and confined him to his original bed.
bulfinch.englishatheist.org /b/pantheon/Asopus.html   (320 words)

  
 Aiakos et alii   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Asopus river was a son of Ocean and Tethys, or, as Acusilaus says, of Pero and Poseidon, or, according to some, of Zeus and Eurynome.
Asopus pursued him, but Zeus, by hurling thunderbolts, sent him away back to his own streams; hence coals are fetched to this day from the streams of that river.
And Telamon betook himself to Salamis, to the court of Cychreus, son of Poseidon and Salamis, daughter of Asopus.
206.183.25.8 /homyth/myths/Aiakidai.html   (1210 words)

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