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Topic: Asphyxia


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In the News (Tue 23 Apr 19)

  
  MySpace.com - Asphyxia - Marseille - Industrial / Electronica / Gothic - www.myspace.com/asphyxiaa
Asphyxia was born in August 2005, after some industrial/electronical tests on a music software.
Throught this personal project I just put down my feelings, and Asphyxia is first made in order to evacuate sadness and hate, or other feeling I could have had since I started.
Asphyxia music can be said as Electro-dark or Industrial, even if I try my best not to be a stereotype.
www.myspace.com /asphyxiaa   (901 words)

  
  Asphyxia
Asphyxia can literally be translated from the Greek as meaning 'absence of pulse', but is usually the term given to deaths due to 'anoxia' or 'hypoxia'.
Postural asphyxia is a related condition, recently coming to the fore due to interest in deaths in police custardy etc, and may involve splinting of the diaphragm during restraint, coupled with the additional requirements for oxygen during a struggle.
When oxygen is not able to reach the lungs because of external occlusion of the mouth and/ or nose, or the airway at the level of the larynx is obstructed (eg by a bolus of food), the cause of the asphyxial death is 'obstruction of the airways'.
www.forensicmed.co.uk /asphyxia.htm   (937 words)

  
  Asphyxia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Asphyxia (from Greek a-, "without" and sphuxis, "pulse, heartbeat") is a condition of severely deficient supply of oxygen to the body that arises from being unable to breathe normally.
Asphyxia causes generalized hypoxia, which primarily affects the tissues and organs most sensitive to hypoxia first, such as the brain, hence resulting in cerebral hypoxia.
Asphyxia is usually characterized by air hunger but this is not always the case; the urge to breathe is triggered by rising carbon dioxide levels in the blood rather than diminishing oxygen levels.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Asphyxia   (1491 words)

  
 Asphyxia, oxygen shortage and the causes of Cerebral Palsy: Origins, Etiology, Aetiology, Causal Pathways
"Before accepting a diagnosis of birth asphyxia, evidence is required of the presence of (1) hypoxia; followed by (2) decompensatory fetal response(s) indicating that the severity of hypoxia had exceeded the adaptive capacity of the fetus; (3) neonatal encephalopathy; and (4) a probable causal link between the encephalopathy and the hypoxia.
Asphyxia, insufficient oxygen to the brain, is a factor in cerebral palsy, but it is difficult to assess its role.
The asphyxia, however, is often considered the symptom of an otherwise sick baby with a neurological problem, not the primary cause of CP.
www.originsofcerebralpalsy.com /09-asphyxia.html   (689 words)

  
 Asphyxia Neonatorum - Definition, Description, Demographics, Causes and symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prognosis, ...
Asphyxia neonatorum is respiratory failure in the newborn, a condition caused by the inadequate intake of oxygen before, during, or just after birth.
Asphyxia neonatorum, also called birth or newborn asphyxia, is defined as a failure to start regular respiration within a minute of birth.
Asphyxia neonatorum is a neonatal emergency as it may lead to hypoxia (lowering of oxygen supply to the brain and tissues) and possible brain damage or death if not correctly managed.
www.healthofchildren.com /A/Asphyxia-Neonatorum.html   (1402 words)

  
 Asphyxia Neonatorum Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence - Find Articles
Asphyxia can also lead to seizures, especially if the baby requires intubation and has a low Apgar score five minutes after birth, and if the blood from the cutting of the umbilical cord has a high acid content.
If asphyxia occurs outside the hospital, a finger should be used to clear any mucus from the baby's throat and gentle mouth-to-mouth resuscitation should be performed.
Today an infant's risk of asphyxia is lower than in the past due to improved prenatal care and awareness of the harmful effects of smoking during pregnancy.
findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_g2602/is_0000/ai_2602000058   (462 words)

  
 Positional asphyxia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Positional asphyxia, also known as postural asphyxia, is a form of asphyxia which occurs when someone's position prevents them from breathing adequately.
Positional asphyxia may be a factor in some of these deaths.
People may die from positional asphyxia by simply getting themselves into a breathing-restricted position they cannot get out of, either through carelessness or as a consequence of another accident.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Positional_asphyxia   (329 words)

  
 Excited Delirium, Restraint Asphyxia, Positional Asphyxia and 'In-Custody Death" Syndromes
Positional asphyxia is a term used to describe the placement of a body in a position that interferes with the ability to breath.
In a case of restraint asphyxia, the cause of death is usually a combination of exhaustion, exertion, fear and restricted breathing due to restraint or the use of force.
The cause of death in positional asphyxia may involve restraint but is more likely associated with leaving an exhausted, drug affected and unconscious person in a position that results in asphyxia.
www.educationoptions.org /programs/articles/SuddenDeath.htm   (2134 words)

  
 Asphyxia Neonatorum Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence - Find Articles
Asphyxia can also lead to seizures, especially if the baby requires intubation and has a low Apgar score five minutes after birth, and if the blood from the cutting of the umbilical cord has a high acid content.
If asphyxia occurs outside the hospital, a finger should be used to clear any mucus from the baby's throat and gentle mouth-to-mouth resuscitation should be performed.
Today an infant's risk of asphyxia is lower than in the past due to improved prenatal care and awareness of the harmful effects of smoking during pregnancy.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_g2602/is_0000/ai_2602000058   (462 words)

  
 asphyxia asthma
Asphyxia is a condition of severe lack of oxygen supplied to the body...
Asphyxia is the lack of oxygen that results when breathing is stopped or seriously disrupted...
Asphyxia is a condition of severe lack of oxygen...
www.health-best.com /asthma/1/asphyxia-asthma.html   (551 words)

  
 The cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses of the immature fetal sheep to acute umbilical cord occlusion -- ...
Fetuses tolerated 30 min of asphyxia and the cardiovascular response was characterized by three phases: initial redistribution of blood flow away from the periphery to maintain vital organ function, partial failure of this redistribution and near terminal cardiovascular collapse, with profound hypotension and cerebral and peripheral hypoperfusion.
The response of the premature fetus to asphyxia
During asphyxia the fetal cardiovascular and cerebrovascular response was characterized by three phases: initial redistribution of blood flow away from the periphery to maintain vital organ function, partial failure of this redistribution and near terminal cardiovascular collapse.
jp.physoc.org /cgi/content/full/517/1/247   (7963 words)

  
 MANAGEMENT OF PERINATAL ASPHYXIA :
asphyxia is one of the leading causes on neonatal morbidity and mortality in our country.
DIC occurs  as a terminal event in the course of asphyxia.
manifestations are determined by the timing,severity and duration of asphyxia.
www.neoclinic.net /Artcl/asph.htm   (770 words)

  
 Perinatal asphyxia Information
Perinatal asphyxia is the medical condition resulting from deprivation of oxygen (hypoxia) to a newborn infant long enough to cause apparent harm.
Perinatal asphyxia happens in 2 to 10 per 1000 newborns that are born a terme.
An infant suffering severe perinatal asphyxia usually has poor color (cyanosis), perfusion, responsiveness, muscle tone, and respiratory effort, as reflected in a low 5 minute Apgar score.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Perinatal_asphyxia   (205 words)

  
 Dorlands Medical Dictionary
li´vida perinatal asphyxia in which the skin is cyanotic from the lack of oxygen in the blood.
asphyxia in the infant during labor, delivery, or the immediate postnatal period, a common cause of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.
asphyxia occurring as a result of sudden or severe compression of the thorax or upper abdomen, or both.
www.mercksource.com /pp/us/cns/cns_hl_dorlands.jspzQzpgzEzzSzppdocszSzuszSzcommonzSzdorlandszSzdorlandzSzdmd_a_67zPzhtm   (2225 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - asphyxia (Pathology) - Encyclopedia
Asphyxia, often referred to as suffocation, usually results from an interruption of breathing due to mechanical blockage of the breathing passages, paralysis of the respiratory muscles following electric shock, inundation of the lungs as may occur with pneumonia or drowning, or substitution of carbon monoxide for oxygen in the red blood cells.
Symptoms of asphyxia vary but may include light-headedness, nausea, and gasping, followed by unconsciousness and death.
Artificial respiration is the most practical first-aid procedure for asphyxia.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/A/asphyxia.html   (250 words)

  
 Dov Apfel -- Newborn Conditions Associated with Asphyxia -- Cerebral Palsy, Birth Injury, Lawyer, Attorney
A frequent cause of HIE is fetal asphyxia.
The term "perinatal asphyxia" is frequently used by pediatricians and neonatologists to describe a brain injury caused by hypoxic and ischemic complications leading to blood gas abnormalities at the time of birth.
While some physicians continue to question whether cerebral palsy can be caused by birth asphyxia, many pediatric neuroradiologists acknowledge that brain damage can result from acute obstetrical emergencies causing total or near total oxygen deprivation, or as a result of partial, intermittent episodes of oxygen deprivation over longer periods of time.
www.birthinjuryinfo.com /biasphyxia.html   (783 words)

  
 Viewpoint on the Brain Disorder in Autism
Asphyxia had to be of seven to eight minutes duration before visible damage of the inferior colliculi was seen.
Rapin (1997) suggested that inability to distinguish syllable and word boundaries in rapid streams of speech may be the basis of the language disorder in some children with autism; she referred to this as "verbal auditory agnosia" [146].
Asphyxia had to be of seven to eight minutes duration before visible damage was seen, and Faro and Windle (1969) found progressive neuropathologic changes in monkeys kept alive for months or years following asphyxia at birth, even in monkeys without the characteristic lesions of the inferior colliculi [30].
www.conradsimon.org /WorkingPaper2003.shtml   (13169 words)

  
 Perinatal Asphyxia in Foals   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Perinatal or neonatal asphyxia is a complication that can occur in foals and is related to the birth process.
Asphyxia is defined as a decrease in the amount of oxygen supplied to the tissues as a result of a reduction in the amount of oxygen in the blood or the amount of blood flowing to the tissues.
At the University of Kentucky Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, 163 cases of perinatal asphyxia were diagnosed over a 3-year period (1998-2000), which represented approximately 7% of all fetuses 10-11 months of gestation and 1 day of age.
www.usyd.edu.au /su/rirdc/articles/breeding/asphysxia.html   (486 words)

  
 Welcome to Horse Health-   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Perinatal asphyxia is a syndrome caused by decreased oxygenation of the foal’s tissues during the birth process.
At the University of Kentucky Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, 163 cases of perinatal asphyxia were diagnosed over a 3-year period (1998-2000), which represented approximately 7% of all fetuses 10-11 months of gestation and 1 day of age (Table 1).
Cases of perinatal asphyxia are consistently negative for infectious agents.
www.completerider.com /PerinatalAsphyxia.htm   (581 words)

  
 Declining Diagnosis of Birth Asphyxia in California: 1991-2000 -- Wu et al. 114 (6): 1584 -- Pediatrics
diagnosis of birth asphyxia decreased by 91% from 14.8 to 1.3
to the declining incidence of birth asphyxia is unknown.
Stillbirths and neonatal encephalopathy in Kathmandu, Nepal: an estimate of the contribution of birth asphyxia to perinatal mortality in a low-income urban population.
pediatrics.aappublications.org /cgi/content/full/114/6/1584   (4019 words)

  
 Asphyxia - ArticleWorld   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Asphyxia is a medical condition characterized by a very low supply of oxygen to someone's body.
If nothing is done to remedy it, asphyxia quickly leads to loss of consciousness and even death.
Asphyxia has been used as an execution method for a long time, and it is currently starting to gain field in the suicide methods.
www.articleworld.org /index.php/Asphyxia   (240 words)

  
 What are Some Causes of Asphyxia?
Asphyxia is caused by a severe lack of oxygen to the body.
Known as compressive asphyxia, this is a popular method of hand to hand combat used by the military.
In all cases of asphyxia that do not result in death, there is a severe risk of brain damage.
www.wisegeek.com /what-are-some-causes-of-asphyxia.htm   (436 words)

  
 NICHD Launches Project to Treat Infant Asphyxia In Lower Income Countries
One estimate holds that newborn asphyxia afflicts from 6 to 10 percent of all births.
Newborn asphyxia may also result when the umbilical cord is compressed between the baby's body and the uterine wall, or when the umbilical cord becomes knotted.
When newborn asphyxia occurs, the chances that an infant will survive without brain damage are greatest if the infant can be resuscitated early—within the first 2 minutes after delivery.
www.nichd.nih.gov /news/releases/infant_asphyxia.cfm?from=women   (812 words)

  
 Historical Review and Recent Advances - Chapter 11
Eastman of Hopkins called asphyxia "an infelicity of etymology" since the Greek derivation of asphyxia meant "without pulse." A second problem seems to be that, within each specialty studying asphyxia, once a definition is established, the exceptions are enormous.
Eastman defined asphyxia as "an inability of the child to breathe and apnea associated with oxygen deficiency during labor." It was this very issue, the initiation of respiration at birth, that stimulated Dr. Eastman's original contributions.
In the 1930's, there was considerable suspicion which indicated that part of the narcosis associated with the administration of anesthetic agents was the hypoxia associated with their use, and that the hypoxia was as responsible for the central nervous system depression as was the agent itself.
www.neonatology.org /classics/mj1980/ch11.html   (2796 words)

  
 Positional Asphyxia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The term positional asphyxia has recently been used to describe the sudden deaths of arrestees that occurred while they were held in restraint by law enforcement personnel.
The use of the terms "positional asphyxia" and "restraint asphyxia" as a cause-of-death infers that when a person dies while placed in restraints by law enforcement personnel their agencies hold some responsibility for the deaths.
Therefore, the use of the phrase "positional asphyxia" should be discontinued until further physlological evidence is presented to support this theory.
www.ppct.com /CJTN/html/libfiles/positional.html   (1389 words)

  
 Differential changes in insulin-like growth factors and their binding proteins following asphyxia in the preterm fetal ...
Paradoxically, this exposed the fetus to profound hypotension and hypoperfusion during asphyxia, and the development of secondary hypoperfusion after asphyxia.
It was the aim of the current study to examine the effect of a severe asphyxial challenge on the fetal IGF/insulin axis of the premature fetal sheep.
Asphyxia was induced in the occlusion group by rapid inflation of the umbilical occluder for 30 min with sterile saline of a defined volume known to completely inflate the occluder.
jp.physoc.org /cgi/content/full/531/3/835   (5098 words)

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