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Topic: Assyria


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  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Assyria   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Assyria proper was located in a mountainous region, extending along the Tigris as far as the high Gordiaean or Carduchian mountain range of Armenia, sometimes called the "Mountains of Ashur".
Assyria, a country named after its original capital city, Asshur on the Tigris, was originally a colony of Babylonia, and was ruled by viceroys from that kingdom.
Assyria was located in a mountainous region lying to the north of Babylonia, extending along the Tigris as far as to the high mountain range of Armenia, the Gordiaean or Carduchian mountains.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Assyria   (1464 words)

  
 JewishEncyclopedia.com - ASSYRIA:   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
The name "Assyria" is the Greek form of the native "Asshur," the city on the west of the Tigris, near its confluence with the Lower Zab, from which the kingdom, and finally the empire, of Assyria was named.
Assyria's relations to the people of Israel are of chief concern in this article; yet a brief statement is necessary regarding its position among the nations of the ancient East, in whose history it is such an important factor.
Assyria, however, was not in a position to subdue Syria completely till the middle of the ninth century; and then the conquest was not permanent.
www.jewishencyclopedia.com /view.jsp?artid=2046&letter=A   (1571 words)

  
 Assyria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Assyria was ruled by vassal kings dependent on the Babylonians for a century.
The population of Assyria was rather small, and the main cities were Ashur, Kalhu and Nineveh, all situated in the Tigris river valley.
Assyria, therefore, was ill-prepared to face the hordes of Scythians and Medes who now began to harass the frontiers to the east; Asia Minor too was infested by the Cimmerians.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Assyria   (3762 words)

  
 Assyria - MSN Encarta
Assyria (ancient Ashur, Ashshur, or Assur), ancient country of Asia, extending from about the northern border of present-day Iraq south to the mouth of the Little Zab River, in the northern part of Iraq.
The ethnic composition of the earliest farming communities of Assyria is unknown; the inhabitants may have been a people known in later days as Subarians, who spoke an agglutinative language rather than an inflected one.
Assyria remained in subjection until early in the 14th century, when the Mitanni Kingdom suffered a serious defeat at the hands of the rising empire of the Hittites to the north.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761564347/Assyria.html   (1098 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Assyria
In treating of Assyria it is extremely difficult not to speak at the same time of its sister, or rather mother country, Babylonia, as the peoples of these two countries, the Semitic Babylonians and Assyrians, are both ethnographically and linguistically the same race, with identical religion, language, literature, and civilization.
Geographically, Assyria occupies the northern and middle part of Mesopotamia, situated between the rivers Euphrates and Tigris; while the southern half, extending as far south as the Persian Gulf, constitutes the countries of Babylonia and Chaldea.
Whether the name Assyria is derived from that of the god Asshur, or vice versa, or whether Asshur was originally the name of a particular city and afterwards applied to the whole country cannot be determined.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/02007c.htm   (9783 words)

  
 Assyria
Basic to the central region of Assyria was farming, fed by both the Tigris river and water from the Armenian mountains in the north, and the Zagros mountains in the east.
As Assyria extended its territories through military campaigns, local rulers were allowed to continue to govern their old regions, as long as they fulfilled their duties to the Assyrian king.
Among the finest cultural achievements of Assyria was literature, which initially used a cuneiform alphabet from the Babylonians written on clay tablets.
www.i-cias.com /e.o/assyria.htm   (768 words)

  
 Assyria
Assyria remained in subjection until early in the 14th century BCE, when the Mitanni Kingdom suffered a serious defeat at the hands of the rising empire of the Hittites to the north.
Assyria, however, was aided by civil war in Elam itself; the country was laid waste with fire and sword, and its capital, Susa, leveled to the ground.
Assyria, therefore, was ill prepared to face the hordes of Scythians who now began to harass her.
www.ancientworlds.net /aw/Places/Place/324904   (3039 words)

  
 Assyria - LoveToKnow 1911
The two great empires, Assyria and Babylon, which grew up on the banks of the Tigris and Euphrates, can be separated as little historically as geographically.
But whereas Assyria takes the first place in the classical accounts to the exclusion of Babylonia, the decipherment of the inscriptions has proved that the converse was really the case, and that, with the exception of some seven or eight centuries, Assyria might be described as a province or dependency of Babylon.
Not only was Babylonia the mother country, as the tenth chapter of Genesis explicitly states, but the religion and culture, the literature and the characters in which it was contained, the arts and the sciences of the Assyrians were derived from their southern neighbours.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Assyria   (173 words)

  
 Assyria. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
B.C. saw Assyria threatening the surrounding states, and under Tiglathpileser I Assyrian soldiers entered the kingdom centered about Urartu (Ararat; see Armenia), took Babylonia, and crossed N Syria to reach the Mediterranean.
Calah, the capital of Assyria during the reigns of Ashurnasirpal II and Shalmaneser III, has been excavated.
B.C. Under the son of Nabopolassar, Nebuchadnezzar, Babylonia was renewed in power, and the great-grandson of Cyaxares, Cyrus the Great, was to establish the Persian Empire, which owed much to the earlier Assyrian state.
www.bartleby.com /65/as/Assyria.html   (719 words)

  
 Assyria   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Assyria was a country located east of the Tigris River; the capital was Ashur (Assur, Asshur, Ashshur), from which the entire country derived its name.
However, Assyria proper began to assert and consolidate itself in 1380 BC, and in 1280 BC Shalmaneser I established his capital at Calah (Kalhu), a few miles south of Nineveh.
For the next two centuries, from 1100 to 900 BC, the nation of Assyria faded almost to extinction; and it was during this decline that David and Solomon ascended.
www.realtime.net /~wdoud/topics/assyria.html   (440 words)

  
 Assyria
The land of Assyria originally consisted of a narrow strip of alluvial soil on each side of the River Tigris.
Assyria pursued a course of expansion and conquest, culminating in the mastery over Elam, Mesopotamia, Syria, Palestine, the Arabian marches, and Egypt.
; and Assyria became a Median province and subsequently a principality of the Persian Empire.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0000245.html   (551 words)

  
 Assyria - International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
Assyria is always distinguished from Babylonia in the Old Testament, and not confounded with it as by Herodotus and other classical writers.
Assyria, speaking generally, was a limestone plateau with a temperate climate, cold and wet in winter, but warm during the summer months.
After this, however, Assyria once more fell into a state of decay, from which it was delivered by the successful revolt of a military officer Pulu (Pul), who put an end to the old line of kings and took the name of Tiglath-pileser IV (745-727 BC).
www.searchgodsword.org /enc/isb/view.cgi?number=T898   (4888 words)

  
 Assyria
It was a mountainous region lying to the north of Babylonia, extending along the Tigris as far as to the high mountain range of Armenia, the Gordiaean or Carduchian mountains.
In 1120 BC[?] Tiglath-Pileser I[?], the greatest of the Assyrian kings, "crossed the Euphrates, defeated the kings of the Hittites, captured the city of Carchemish, and advanced as far as the shores of the Mediterranean." He may be regarded as the founder of the first Assyrian empire.
Assur-bani-pal or Ashurbanipal (Ashurbanapli), the son of Esarhaddon, became king, and in Ezra 4:10 is referred to as Asnapper or Osnappar.
www.findword.org /as/assyria.html   (1041 words)

  
 Assyria - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Ashur was Assyria's chief god, but the gods of the Babylonians and Hittites were also honored.
Sennacherib's successor, Esar-Haddon, defeated the Chaldaeans, who threatened Assyria and carried his conquests (673-670) to Egypt, where he deposed Taharka and established Necho in power.
The king of the Medes, Cyaxares, and the Babylonian ruler Nabopolassar, joined forces and took Nineveh in 612 BC Under the son of Nabopolassar, Nebuchadnezzar, Babylonia was renewed in power, and the great-grandson of Cyaxares, Cyrus the Great, was to establish the Persian Empire, which owed much to the earlier Assyrian state.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-assyria.html   (900 words)

  
 The history of ancient Assyria
ASSYRIA, a daughter land born of Babylon, thrust aside the mother city and for a brief time held control of the Euphrates valley.
The rise of Assyria to power was a natural consequence of the weakness of Babylon under her foreign Kassite kings.
Assyria occupied originally the hill country along the middle course of the Tigris River, and gradually spread its power throughout the upper Euphrates valley, and thence southward over the whole of ancient Sumer and Akkad.
www.publicbookshelf.com /public_html/The_Story_of_the_Greatest_Nations_and_the_Worlds_Famous_Events_Vol_1/ancienta_ia.html   (1188 words)

  
 Assyria - Crystalinks
Assyria in earliest historical times referred to a region on the Upper Tigris river, named for its original capital, the ancient city of Ashur.
Assyria had some slaves, but these played only a small part in the economy.
Among the finest cultural achievements of Assyria was literature, which initially used a cuneiform alphabet from the Babylonians written on clay tablets until 750 BC.
www.crystalinks.com /assyrian.html   (3662 words)

  
 All Empires - Assyria
For the first time in history the idea of centralization was introduced into politics; the conquered provinces were organized under an elaborate bureaucracy at the head of which was the king, each district paying a fixed tribute and providing a military contingent.
Assyria, however, was aided by civil war in Elam itself; the country was wasted with fire and sword, and its capital Susa levelled with the ground.
It had been drained of both wealth and fighting population; the devastated provinces of Elam and Babylonia could yield nothing with which to supply the needs of the imperial exchequer, and it was difficult to find sufficient troops even to garrison the conquered populations.
www.allempires.com /empires/assyria/assyria1.htm   (3118 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Assyria
Assyria ASSYRIA [Assyria], ancient empire of W Asia.
Assyria's Rise The nucleus of a Semitic state was forming by the beginning of the 3d millennium BC, but it was overshadowed by the
History Of The Babylonians And Assyrians: Kassite Conquest Of Babylonia And The Appearance Of Assyria.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Assyria   (609 words)

  
 Assyria (general introduction)
Assyria was overthrown in 612 BCE by the Babylonians.
Assyria's fortunes were restored, and under king Aššurnasirpal II (883-859), the soldiers of Aššur, now often fighting on horseback, marched to the Zagros mountains, reached Lake Urmia, and waged war against the kingdom of
One of the great challenges was the organization of Babylonia in the south, which was Assyria's twin-culture and was too highly esteemed to be reduced to the status of province.
www.livius.org /as-at/assyria/assyria.html   (1771 words)

  
 History of Assyrians
Assyria is located in north Mesopotamia and spans four countries: In Syria it extends west to the Euphrates river; in Turkey it extends north to Harran, Edessa, Diyarbakir, and Lake Van; in Iran it extends east to Lake Urmi, and in Iraq it extends to about 100 miles south of Kirkuk.
To the north and east of Assyria lie the Taurus and Zagros mountains.
This is from where Assyria derived her strength, as it could feed a large population of professionals and craftsman, which allowed it to expand and advance the art of civilization.
www.aina.org /aol/peter/brief.htm   (2747 words)

  
 Assyria
Assyria: Assyria's Rise - Assyria's Rise The nucleus of a Semitic state was forming by the beginning of the 3d millennium...
Assyria: Assyria's Decline - Assyria's Decline Despite the magnificence of Assurbanipal's court, Assyria began a rapid decline...
Assyria: The Ascendancy of Assyria - The Ascendancy of Assyria Assyrian greatness was to wait until the 9th cent., when Ashurnasirpal II...
www.factmonster.com /ce6/history/A0805095.html   (122 words)

  
 Clark's Corner: Lessons From Assyria
Except for a couple of geographic directions in Genesis and a prophecy of Assyria's future ascent and fall in the book of Numbers (22:22, 24), Assyria is unmentioned in the Bible story until 2 Kings 15, which is late in the history of the Old Testament.
It seemed to be a common occurrence in the ancient world that, when a sovereign died, the conquered territories rebelled (especially the ones farther from the center of the kingdom) and his successor was required to prove himself strong enough to hold the system together.
After all was said and done, Assyria was given a place in hell, though in its time of glory on earth it "caused terror in the land of the living" (Ezek.32:21-23).
www.isaiah58.com /clark/clark05_28_98.html   (2001 words)

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