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Topic: Astounding Magazine


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  Astounding (magazine) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930.
The word "and" was sometimes replaced in the logo by a pseudo-mathematical symbol comprising a horizontal right-pointing arrow piercing an inverted U-shape.
Over the course of a year the title logo was changed; the large initial "A" stayed the same while the letters "stounding" were faded down and the letters "nalog" faded up on top of them.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Analog_Magazine   (338 words)

  
 Astounding (magazine) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Astounding Stories of Super-Science, first edited by Harry Bates, is generally considered the forum where modern science fiction was created.
Following 8 years of publication under two different editors, the magazine's helm was assumed by John W. Campbell, who took over in 1937.
Bibliographers often abbreviate the magazine as ASF, which can of course stand for either title.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Astounding_Magazine   (338 words)

  
 Astounding Science Fiction
Campbell took over the editorship of Astounding in October 1937, but it's generally acknowledged that his definitive style only became fully established with the July 1939 issue (containing the first stories to appear in the magazine by both Van Vogt and Asimov).
Many of these stories are still widely available on the second-hand market (or in some happy cases, still in print), in anthologies and collections and the book versions of serials, as well as the original magazines and (if you live in the UK) their British Reprint versions.
To give a flavor of the richness of ideas that can be found in Astounding, I've also included a page of quotations from some of the key writers and their stories.
www.andrew-may.com /asf   (491 words)

  
 Astounding (magazine) - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Science-Fiction: The Gernsback Years : A Complete Coverage of the Genre Magazines Amazing, Astounding, Wonder, and Others from 1926 Through 1936
The Battle of Adobe Walls myth vs reality: the facts have been twisted over the years, but the real story is still astounding.
The astounding fifties: A selection from Astounding Science Fiction Magazine
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /astounding_magazine.htm   (349 words)

  
 "Reflections" by Robert Silverberg
Campbell’s taste was a more sober one: what he wanted were smoothly told stories of the relatively near future, with realistically drawn characters and careful attention to scientific plausibility, and he let it be known he would welcome submissions from any writer, known or unknown, who could meet the standard he hoped to set.
Though that one made little impact, he was back in October with "The Command," the story of a bear with a high IQ and a liking for chemistry, that touched off popular demand for a string of sequels, and his career as a science-fiction writer was launched.
Another notable de Camp story is "The Wheels of If" (Astounding, 1940), a rollicking alternate-universe story that transports another twentieth-century man into a mysteriously transmogrified twentieth century in which, he eventually discovers, the New World is controlled by the descendants of the Viking explorers of a thousand years earlier.
www.asimovs.com /_issue_0106/stories/reflections.shtml   (1532 words)

  
 'Astounding/Analog' at 70: The Golden Age and Beyond
The first issue of Amazing was published in 1926, while Astounding Stories of Super-Science (to use its full original title) was established four years later by the Clayton magazine group as a slightly tardy competitor.
Astounding began as a Johnny-come-lately imitator to Amazing -- the cover of the January 1930 issue features a dude in an aviator's helmet punching out a giant beetle while a girl in a leather mini-skirt cowers behind him.
The magazine owed its survival to more than its digest format, which all the SandS pulps had adopted due to wartime paper shortages.
www.space.com /sciencefiction/astounding_2_991124.html   (924 words)

  
 [No title]
Thirteen magazines in all -- which by the inflexible laws of geometrics left three blank spaces in that heady array.
From that time until his death in 1971 John Campbell edited this magazine, shaping it, making it his own, shaping as well the writers who appeared in it, and in so doing he altered the entire course of this field.
We are tempted to digress and say too much about this admirable magazine, but will resist and simply state that it was unique as well as being the best magazine of fantasy fiction ever published, going on from victory to victory before being defeated by the wartime paper shortage.
www.iol.ie /~carrollm/hh/a20-intro.htm   (3702 words)

  
 MAGAZINES BY TITLE:
Owners name written in pen in large letters in background of front cv and a few checkmarks/marginialia internally in pen else about VG.
Magazine size (11 x 8 and 1/2 in) PB.
(Magazine.), THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION OCT 1969  NY..
showcase.netins.net /web/brianbk2/Magazines1.htm   (2457 words)

  
 Astounding Books
This is Campbell's own retrospective of Astounding's golden years, containing 24 stories ranging from Heinlein's Blowups Happen and Van Vogt's Vault of the Beast (both dating from 1940) to James H Schmitz' The Witches of Karres (1949) and H Beam Piper's Last Enemy (1950).
A Requiem for Astounding, by Alva Rogers (1964).
This is the best-known history of Astounding magazine, produced by someone who was a devoted fan rather than a literary critic.
www.andrew-may.com /asf/books.htm   (224 words)

  
 Magazines and E-zines Arts, Directory   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine Lighthearted science fiction and fantasy magazine, published bi-monthly in print.
Astounding Dedicated to John W Campbell's classic magazine Astounding Science Fiction, with a list of stories published plus a selection of quotations from stories.
Artemis Magazine Their content is near-term, near-Earth, hard science fiction.
www.wacofdn.org /d2RjXzU1NTg2.aspx   (1008 words)

  
 ureland.com » Arts » Literature » Genres » Science Fiction » Magazines and E-zines   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Artemis Magazine - Their content is near-term, near-Earth, hard science fiction.
Astounding - Dedicated to John W Campbell's classic magazine Astounding Science Fiction, with a list of stories published plus a selection of quotations from stories.
Talebones - The magazine of science fiction and dark fantasy.
www.ureland.com /dir/Top/Arts/Literature/Genres/Science_Fiction/Magazines_and_E-zines   (1369 words)

  
 DreamHaven Books, Comics and Art   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Includes van Vogt "Slan", Harry Bates "Farewell to the Master" which was the basis for the film "The Day the Earth Stood Still", others.
Oversize magazine including interview with Delany, fiction by Shirley, Koja, Di Filippo, and much more.
Natural phenomena magazine features an article on Lovecraft and The Mythos of Scientific Materialism.
www.dreamhavenbooks.com /rare-Mags.php   (8220 words)

  
 Handlist of the Eric Frank Russell Collection 1937-1984   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Also included with these letters is a newspaper cutting, in reference to the subscription rates for Astounding and the receipt from EFR's bank confirming the payment for six years subscription, also a letter from the General Post Office explaining the use of money orders.
Astounding agree to take Nothing New, but return Proof and Sole Solution ; mention of a document sent to EFR, detailing the rights assigned on all his stories, but is asked to clarify whether he wrote The Mechanical Mice, under the pen name Maurice G Hugi.
Although most of the correspondence is related to Science Fantasy magazine, there is also a certain amount of personal material included.
sca.lib.liv.ac.uk /~cheshire/sfead/html/4A3.html   (1889 words)

  
 Bare-Faced Messiah -- Chapter 5   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
It was possible to date, precisely, the metamorphosis that ushered in the Golden Age because it began with the appointment of John W. Campbell Junior as editor of *Astounding* magazine, at the age of twenty-seven, in early 1938.
Campbell wanted Ron to contribute to *Unknown*, a new magazine he was in the process of launching which was to specialize in bizarre fantasy, and promised to reserve space for him with a proviso that only `genuinely first-rate fantasy' would be considered.
Serialized in the April, May and June issues of *Astounding*, *Final Blackout* precipitated furious controversy in fan magazines and bitter accusations that it was Communist or Fascist propaganda.
www.nots.org /chap5.htm   (8046 words)

  
 [No title]
According to Astounding Magazine, the series was billed as the "first science fiction radio show of science- fictioneers, by science-fictioneers, and for science-fictioneers...".
Twenty eight of the twenty nine shows in the series survived and are available to collectors.
The series was narrated by the editor of Astounding Magazine, John W. Cambell, Jr., with scripts written by some of the best writers of science fiction including Gordon Dickson, Robert Silverberg and others.
www.old-time.com /otrlogs2/et_.log.txt   (382 words)

  
 KELLY HOPSKINVILLE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
This is not concluding, as witnesses or investigators could have used a blade for removing the bullet from the wall (5).
In this connection, it is amusing to read in GEPA magazine that "it was assured no circus or show with wild beasts happened to be in the vicinity" at that time (11).
As if by chance, the French magazine VSD published in July 2001 a special issue on "UFOs in USA", and the Flatwoods case was among the rare cases chosen as the most representative ones.
francine.juncosa.club.fr /pages/souspagekelly3eng.htm   (12240 words)

  
 Isaac Asimov   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In 1941, Isaac began a series of stories about robots which were first published in Astounding magazine and later collected in the book, I, Robot.
In 1942, Isaac wrote a short story called Foundation which led to a series about the fall and revival of a galactic empire published in Astounding magazine and later collected in a series of three books (Foundation, Foundation and Empire and Second Foundation).
By the time the books were published, Isaac Asimov had grown tired of the theme and the story was unfinished.
www.menziesera.com /people/asimov.shtml   (702 words)

  
 PhatNav Directory - / Arts / Literature / Genres / Science_Fiction / Magazines_and_E-zines   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Dedicated to John W Campbell's classic magazine Astounding Science Fiction, with a list of stories published plus a selection of quotations from stories.
The award-winning Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, founded in 1949.
Micro-charge science fiction magazine with stories ranging from 25 to 75 cents.
www.phatnav.com /directory/Arts/Literature/Genres/Science_Fiction/Magazines_and_E-zines.cat   (914 words)

  
 [No title]
Smith knew exactly where he was going with the four books, had a complete outline, and actually wrote the ending of the fourth book before he began work on the first one.
It should be noted that there are textual differences between the serialized versions and the hardbacks; in the magazine versions, the Evil Eddorians aren't even known to exist until the last book.
EES was concerned over this, even in his original outline, because he knew he needed a strong "phony ending" for a break between SSL and COTL, while the Children grew to maturity, and he couldn't come up with one that he really liked.
www.ibiblio.org /pub/electronic-publications/ibic/Lensman-FAQ2   (2672 words)

  
 CopperCon 21: Julian May information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
She discovered science fiction at age sixteen through SF pulp magazines.
She became involved in fandom, writing letters to fans in the US and abroad.
Her first short story, "Dune Roller", appeared in Astounding magazine in December 1951.
www.casfs.org /cucon/cu21/jmay.html   (252 words)

  
 [No title]
His use of language might be considered florid by modern standards, but his unabashed command of vocabulary and complex sentence structure are quite enjoyable, particularly when you realize that what he was writing was, by Victorian standards, leaned-down and Hemingwayesque.
It should be noted that there are textual differences between the serialized versions and the hardbacks; in the magazine versions, the Eddorians aren't even known to exist until the last book.
F. Orlin Tremaine, the editor who'd left "ASTOUNDING" in 1938, was working on a new magazine, "COMET," which was having major financial and circulation problems.
www.ibiblio.org /pub/electronic-publications/ibic/Authors/EE-Smith   (2011 words)

  
 Bare-Faced Messiah: Chapter 5   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
As an editor, Campbell used his magazine to speculate on the implications - emotional, philosophical and sociological - of future scientific discoveries.
In response Ron produced a story called 'The Ultimate Adventure', which was used as the lead novel in the April 1939 issue and marked the beginning of a tenure during which his name was virtually a permanent fixture in the magazine.
For many weeks a light could be seen burning all night in the window of the little cabin at the back of The Hilltop as the stories rolled relentlessly out of his typewriter.
www.xs4all.nl /~kspaink/cos/rmiller/bfm05.htm   (7949 words)

  
 Old Dogs in the Attic: 'Astounding' Turns 70
Representing a complete run from June 1937 to the present along with 13 previous issues dating back to November 1932, it's a huge collection that nearly fills a six-shelf aluminum restaurant rack.
As irony would have it, the cover story of that issue was "The Unreachable Stars," a novelette by its future editor, Dr. Stanley Schmidt, illustrated by Frank Kelly Freas, the artist most commonly associated with the magazine's later years.
But Analog satisfied my SF jones more often than its rivals and so, when I found myself financially able to collect vintage SF magazines many years later, it was back issues of Analog and Astounding that I sought out....
www.space.com /sciencefiction/astounding_birthday_991124.html   (502 words)

  
 THE ASTOUNDING B MONSTER | B MONSTER BULLETIN
His most recent work appeared in the April 2002 issue of Analog magazine and in an illustrated edition of George Orwell's "Animal Farm." His art graced myriad pulp and paperback covers, album and CD jackets and the noses of WW II bombers.
In 1971, he published "The Astounding Fifties," a collection of the fl and white illustrations he rendered for Astounding magazine.
His seductive artwork has adorned comics, magazine covers, CD packaging, is available in sketchbooks and color collections, and hangs in private galleries.
www.bmonster.com /feb2005.shtml   (4454 words)

  
 AwardWeb: Hugo Award Winners from the 1950s
Fan Magazine: Fantasy Times (James V. Taurasi, Sr.
The 1957 Hugos were given out at Loncon I in London, UK.
This award looks extremely similar to the International Fantasy Award, an award given out during the 1950s.
dpsinfo.com /awardweb/hugos/50s.html   (293 words)

  
 Fiction
The Atomic Monument (with Forrest J Ackerman) [revised from Memorial Astounding Science Fiction April 1946], (vi) Fantasticonglomeration
The Silken-Swift, (novelette) The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction November 1953
The [Widget], the [Wadget], and Boff, (novella) The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction November & December 1955
www.physics.emory.edu /~weeks/sea/stories.html   (8216 words)

  
 Books
143 • The [Widget], the [Wadget], and Boff • na The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction November and December 1955
122 • The [Widget], the [Wadget], and Boff • na The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction November and December 1955
269 • The [Widget], the [Wadget], and Boff • na The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction November and December 1955
www.physics.emory.edu /~weeks/sea/books.html   (6720 words)

  
 Science Fiction Timeline Site . . . Gharlane's LENSMEN Faq . . .
The book dustjackets and interior illustrations are credited to Ric Binkley, and strongly derived from earlier ASTOUNDING artwork, primarily that of Charles Schneeman and Hubert Rogers.
Orlin Tremaine, the editor who'd left ASTOUNDING in 1938, was working on a new magazine, COMET, which was having major financial and circulation problems.
The original illustrations from ASTOUNDING, presumably approved by EES and Campbell, usually show Worsel with either four or six eyes on stalks.
www.chronology.org /noframes/lens   (3010 words)

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