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Topic: Astronomical spectroscopy


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In the News (Sun 23 Jun 19)

  
  Spectroscopy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Spectroscopy is the study of spectra, that is, the dependence of physical quantities on frequency.
Spectroscopy is often used in physical and analytical chemistry for the identification of substances, through the spectrum emitted or absorbed.
Raman spectroscopy uses the inelastic scattering of light to analyse vibrational and rotational modes of molecules.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Spectroscopy   (1753 words)

  
 Astronomical spectroscopy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Astronomical spectroscopy is the technique of spectroscopy used in astronomy.
Spectroscopy can be used to derive many properties of distant stars and galaxies, such as their chemical composition and also their motion, via the Doppler shift.
Astronomical spectroscopy began with Isaac Newton's initial observations of the light of the Sun, dispersed by a prism.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Astronomical_spectroscopy   (1195 words)

  
 Spectroscopy - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The intensity of emitted electromagnetic radiation and the amount of absorbed electromagnetic radiation are studied by electromagnetic spectroscopy.
Infra-red spectroscopy In Organic chemistry different types of interatomic bond vibrate at different frequencies in the infra-red part of the spectrum.
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy NMR spectroscopy analyzes certain atomic nuclei to determine different local environments of hydrogen, carbon, or other atoms in the molecule of an organic compound or other compound.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Spectroscopy   (1557 words)

  
 Astronomical Spectroscopy and Photometry
Astronomical photometry is the measure of the light emitted by a celestial source.
Astronomical photometry is based on the concept of magnitude, which is the measure of the intensity of the light emitted by a star.
The development of spectroscopy, that is of the study of the spectrum of the luminous beams, began in the 19th century, when the first spectroscope was built.
www.pd.astro.it /E-MOSTRA/NEW/A4001FOT.HTM   (2507 words)

  
 Astronomical spectroscopy: Encyclopedia topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Astronomical spectroscopy is the technique of spectroscopy (spectroscopy: The use of spectroscopes to analyze spectra) used in astronomy (astronomy: The branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole).
Spectroscopy can be used to derive many properties of distant stars and galaxies, such as their chemical composition and also their motion, via the Doppler shift (Doppler shift: Change in the apparent frequency of a wave as observer and source move toward or away from each other).
Edwin Hubble (Edwin Hubble: United States astronomer who discovered that (as the universe expands) the speed with which nebulae recede increases with their distance (1889-1953)) discovered in the 1920's that, apart from the nearest ones (the Local Group (Local Group: the local group is the group of galaxies that includes our galaxy, the milky way....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /reference/astronomical_spectroscopy   (1330 words)

  
 Star Light, Star Bright - Spectra, Spectra in the Night
Once this was realized and astronomical spectroscopy improved to the point of breaking apart the spectra of the nebula, a host of new chemical discoveries in space became possible.
Despite the prominence of visible light in astronomical spectroscopy, ultimately all parts of the electromagnetic spectrum are proving useful for probing the physical and chemical nature of the universe.
UV spectroscopy is of particular interest to astronomy for its ability to detect the strong transitions of the elements H, D, He, C, N, O, Mg, Si, S, and Fe.
pubs.acs.org /hotartcl/tcaw/00/oct/lesney.html   (2391 words)

  
 Astronomical Spectroscopy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Much of it has been pieced together using the techniques of astronomical spectroscopy, and the purpose of this Leaflet is to give some idea of how it is done and how richly rewarding the researches have been.
Spectroscopy in the microwave region of the spectrum has shown us the red-shifted radiation that was emitted at the time of the Big Bang.
The spectrographs on La Palma are used for a wide variety of research programmes initiated by astronomers from the RGO and from University departments, often in collaboration with radio, infrared and X-ray astronomers.
www.oarval.org /spectroscopy.htm   (1362 words)

  
 [No title]
Spectroscopy was a very attractive field of study to the amateur scientists of the 19th century, and no doubt many of the direct vision spectroscopes to be found at antique shows today were used to admire the natural world without necessarily dissecting it.
In 1877, he published a spectral catalog of 209 stars, and included a note on the possibility of measuring radial velocity using the displacement of lines, which was attempted by Huggins in 1878.
Using a grating ruled by Wanscheff in Berlin, he attempted stellar spectroscopy in 1881, which was probably the first attempt at obtaining the spectra of a star, but it was not successful.
home.europa.com /~telscope/histspec.txt   (5290 words)

  
 Material for course 3020 Astronomical Spectroscopy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range holds the key to understanding many astonomical phenomena, since it provides the means to study the temperature, density, pressure, chemical composition (abundances), velocity field, and total amount of gas.
Spectroscopy, even when used for purely continuum studies, provides more detail than imaging (certainly in the case of point sources!), and provides intensity information at points in wavelength, frequency, or velocity space.
In addition, even when spectroscopy is used in a supporting role, such as in determining the redshift of extragalactic galaxies or quasars, the implications can have far-reaching results.
www.tcd.ie /Physics/People/Brian.Espey/teaching_3020.html   (324 words)

  
 Spectroscopy Links
Stellar Spectroscopy is a set of four slides from Armagh Observatory that provide a basic, visual introduction.
Mini Spectroscopy "is a simplified version of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics full-featured spectroscopy software called Virtual Spectroscope." The Java applet allows you produce a spectrum from a fluorescent lamp, the Sun, a red LED, Hydrogen and three galaxies.
Spectroscopy of Supernova Remnants Lesson Plan is one of the set of units developed by teachers and NASA educators for years 9-12.
outreach.atnf.csiro.au /education/senior/astrophysics/spectroscopy_links.html   (1329 words)

  
 Obtaining Astronomical Spectra- Spectrographs
The rise of spectroscopy for astronomical use was in part due to its linkage with another emerging technology - photography.
Infrared spectroscopy allows astronomers to study regions of star birth obscured to optical astronomy by cold clouds of dust and gas.
High-energy spectroscopy in the X-ray and γ-ray regions is more difficult s the instruments have to withstand the rigours of a rocket launch and the harsh environment of space.
outreach.atnf.csiro.au /education/senior/astrophysics/spectrographs.html   (1623 words)

  
 Week 7 Readings   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
She drew her readers' attention to the founding of what she called "astronomical or cosmical physics", a new science that was markedly different in goals as well as methods from its older mathematical cousin.
Coupling the spectroscope to the astronomical telescope amalgamated the methods, instruments, and theories of chemistry and physics to those of astronomy suggesting new questions which, in turn, generated new mensurational tasks and ultimately realigned the familiar boundaries of acceptable research in astronomy.
Astronomers had long accepted that stars move in relation to one another, but it was only possible to measure a star's motion across the field of view, its "proper motion".
eee.uci.edu /clients/bjbecker/ExploringtheCosmos/week7a.html   (9316 words)

  
 Astronomical spectroscopy : Royal Observatory, Greenwich : Royal Observatory Greenwich   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Much of it has been pieced together using the techniques of astronomical spectroscopy and the purpose of this pamphlet is to give some idea of how it is done and how richly rewarding the researches have been.
Spectroscopy in the micro-wave region of the spectrum has shown us the red-shifted radiation which was emitted at the time of the Big Bang.
The spectrographs on La Palma are used for a wide variety of research programmes initiated by astronomers from the RGO and from University departments, often in collaboration with radio, infrared and X--ray astronomers.
www.rog.nmm.ac.uk /server/show/conWebDoc.336/setPaginate/No/outputRegister/lowhtml   (1472 words)

  
 Spectra
Astronomers produce spectra by means of a "spectrograph" affixed to the telescope.
As an aid to understanding, astronomers began classifying the spectra, the schemes culminating about 1890 in the one still used today when E.C. Pickering lettered the stars according to the strengths of their hydrogen lines, his assistants Annie Cannon, Antonia Maury, and Williamina Fleming aiding in development and observation.
At the modern limit, astronomers can measure shifts produced by line-of-sight motions that are as small as a few meters per second, less than the speed of a world class runner.
www.astro.uiuc.edu /~kaler/sow/spectra.html   (5857 words)

  
 Spectroscopy Discussion | Training on Spectroscopy | Software Tools
Spectroscopy is a technique that uses the interaction of energy with a sample to perform an analysis.
In simplest terms, spectroscopy requires an energy source (commonly a laser, but this could be an ion source or radiation source) and a device for measuring the change in the energy source after it has interacted with the sample (often a spectrophotometer or interferometer).
Attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy and the related technique called frustrated multiple internal reflection spectroscopy are used to analyze coatings and opaque liquids.
www.camo.com /rt/Resources/spectroscopy.html   (703 words)

  
 FTS-2 Project Page
Astronomical spectroscopy at submillimetre wavelengths holds much promise for fields as diverse as the study of planetary atmospheres, molecular clouds and extragalactic sources.
Following the pioneering work of Maillard in astronomical imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy at near infrared wavelengths with the Canada France Hawaii Telescope, the rapid development of array detectors and the increased capabilities of modern computers have propelled this field to a mature level.
Recent measurements obtained with the U of L FTS operating with a single detector at the JCMT have shown that Fourier spectroscopy is capable of differentiating continuum and line emission in complex regions like the Orion molecular cloud.
research.uleth.ca /scuba2   (1031 words)

  
 Most of the time large telescopes are collecting light for a spectrograph, which spreads the light out into a rainbow. ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Astronomers want to use every available photon to maximum advantage in a spectrograph so it must be efficient.
Spectroscopy can be performed across much of the EM spectrum.
Spectroscopy in the optical, infrared, mm and radio can be done from earth..
www.physics.mq.edu.au /~qap/PHYS278/PHYS278AA_LEC5_files/slide0013.htm   (139 words)

  
 Introduction   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
This cookbook is an introduction to and overview of fibre spectroscopy and, in particular, the techniques and software available for reducing observations made with fibre-fed spectrographs.
Fibre spectroscopy is not the only technique for simultaneously observing the spectra of many objects.
However, Section 9 gives a brief summary of their advantages and disadvantages relative to fibre spectroscopy in order to help you to judge whether fibre spectroscopy is appropriate for your purposes.
star-www.rl.ac.uk /star/dvi/sc14.htx/node3.html   (952 words)

  
 Infrared Spectroscopy of Cosmic Dust in the Laboratory: An Effort to Identify the Minerals in Interstellar Grains   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Astronomical spectroscopy provides information on the types and abundances of matter present in a variety of astrophysical environments.
The infrared region of the spectrum is particularly useful in characterizing the dust because the stretching, bending, rocking, wagging, and other modes of molecular bonds as well as lattice modes of solids are located in the infrared.
To interpret the astronomical spectra it is necessary to have laboratory spectra of well-characterized materials that match the astronomical spectra.
infrared.als.lbl.gov /WIRMS/paper_4947.htm   (920 words)

  
 Joseph Monica A The contribution of Arthur Adel to astronomical infrared spectroscopy, 1973. AIP International Catalog ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Joseph Monica A The contribution of Arthur Adel to astronomical infrared spectroscopy, 1973.
The contribution of Arthur Adel to astronomical infrared spectroscopy, 1973.
Biographical paper by Monica A. Joseph documenting Adel's early (1930s) work in infrared spectroscopy at the University of Michigan and at the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, AZ.
www.aip.org /history/catalog/icos/6432.html   (140 words)

  
 starphysics observatory - Amateur Astronomical Spectroscopy
This spring I am teaching a short course to introduce spectroscopy to physics students called "Spectroscopy and the Birth of Astrophysics".
Spectroscopy is the most important of professional techniques, but a relatively new field of amateur astronomy.
Like precision photometry, there is a lot of technique to spectroscopy, both in data collection and even more in analysis.
www.starphysics.com   (569 words)

  
 SORS 2003 2004
Special laboratories are maintained for the development of telescope instrumentation; for the spectroscopy of atoms and molecules; and for the petrologic and mineralogic studies of meteorites and lunar samples.
Research specialties: molecular spectroscopy, structure, and dynamics and their application to atmospheric studies; laboratory spectroscopy and balloon-, aircraft-, and satellite-borne measurements of the Earth's atmosphere; atmospheric composition and radiative transfer.
SAO/CfA astronomers were the first to uncover the large-scale structure of the distribution of galaxies in space and the acceleration of the Universe.
www.si.edu /ofg/Units/sorssao.htm   (8084 words)

  
 William P. Hobby-Robert E. Eberly Telescope
The HET is uniquely designed to collect and analyze light from astronomical objects such as comets, planets, stars, and galaxies using a technique called spectroscopy.
Spectroscopy provides astronomers with a wealth of information such as what stars are made of, how far away they are, and how fast they are moving.
Astronomers will use the telescope to search for planets in orbit around other stars, learn more about the "dark matter" that surrounds galaxies, and refine theories about how stars are born and how they die.
www.personal.psu.edu /dept/ur/NEWS/news/hetdedication.html   (771 words)

  
 Publisher description for Library of Congress control number 86013003   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
A group of acknowledged experts describe the use of spectroscopy as a diagnostic probe of astronomical environments.
The broad sweep of the book enables good coverage to be given to all the situations in which plasmas are encounteres in astronomical investigations.
The book was stimulated by the extraordinary contributions to astronomical spectroscopy of Leo Goldberg, and is dedicated to him.
www.loc.gov /catdir/description/cam023/86013003.html   (214 words)

  
 Review 0498
Practical Amateur Spectroscopy contains everything you need to understand the basic principles, to begin observing, and to interpret what the spectra you have seen or recorded show and mean.
There are descriptions of all kinds of instrument, ranging from simple do-it-yourself projects like a direct-vision star spectroscope, to imaging with commercially made spectrographs.
Astronomical Spectroscopy with the Santa Barbara Instrument Group Self-Guiding Spectrometer.
www.amazings.com /sbb/reviews/review0498.html   (154 words)

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