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Topic: Atanasoff-Berry Computer


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 Encyclopedia: Colossus computer
Atanasoff Berry Computer of circa 1937 was electronic and arguably the first working digital computer, but wasn't programmable.
The Colossus computers were used to help decipher teleprinter messages which had been encrypted using the Lorenz SZ40/42 machine.
The Colossus machines were early computing devices used by British codebreakers to read encrypted German messages during World War II.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Colossus-computer   (653 words)

  
 Articles - Atanasoff Berry Computer
The Atanasoff-Berry Computer was the first electronic digital computer [1] [2] and was a major step in the history of computing.
The Atanasoff-Berry Computer represented several innovations in computing, including a binary system of arithmetic, parallel processing, regenerative memory, and a separation of memory and computing functions.
Although the Atanasoff-Berry Computer was an important step up from earlier computing machines, it was not a stored program computer.
www.bladedesigner.com /articles/Atanasoff_Berry_Computer   (1085 words)

  
 ABC-Machine-1941
The Atanasoff computer was approximately the size of a large desk.
In 1948, the original ABC computer was dismantled by Iowa State University officials, without the knowledge of Atanasoff.
The ABC computer, as it was later called, was the first electronic digital computer.
www.computermuseum.li /Testpage/ABC-Computer-1940.htm   (227 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Search View - ENIAC
Their system used the binary arithmetic system of 1s and 0s commonly used in today’s computers as well as a memory drum that stored data in a method similar to the storage technique used in modern memory chips.
The computer was composed of 30 separate units with additional power supplies and cooling units.
Unlike modern computers, which use microprocessors composed of thousands or millions of transistors, ENIAC used vacuum tubes to process data.
encarta.msn.com /text_761587960__1/ENIAC.html   (667 words)

  
 ABC --  Encyclopædia Britannica
However, the first special-purpose electronic computer may actually have been invented by John Vincent Atanasoff, a physicist and mathematician at Iowa State College (now Iowa State University), during...
It was generally believed that the first electronic digital computers were the Colossus, built in England in 1943, and the ENIAC, built in the United States in 1945.
Readers of the summer 2003 issue of American Bowler, the official publication of the American Bowling Congress (ABC), were startled by a headline-opening sentence of an editorial by the ABC's executive director, Roger Dalkin: “It's time to dissolve the American Bowling Congress.” Dalkin, disappointed that both his organization and the Women's International Bowling...
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9003260   (794 words)

  
 Department of Computer Science: Iowa State University
Clark Mollenhoff in his book, Atanasoff, Forgotten Father of the Computer, details the design and construction of the Atanasoff-Berry Computer with emphasis on the relationships of the individuals.
Alice and Arthur Burks in their book, The First Electronic Computer: The Atanasoff Story, describe the design and construction of the ABC and provide a more technical perspective.
Inventors of the Modern Computer: Atanasoff and Berry
www.cs.iastate.edu /jva/jva-archive.shtml   (260 words)

  
 cbi00001.xml
Atanasoff and a graduate student, Clifford Berry, had developed a prototype electronic computer in 1938, later named the Atanasoff Berry Computer (ABC).
Berry, Clifford E. Brainerd, John G. (John Grist), 1904-1988.
John Mauchly visited Atanasoff in 1941 and was aware of the ABC, and Atanasoff believed that the design of the ENIAC was based on the ABC.
special.lib.umn.edu /findaid/ead/cbi/cbi00001.xml   (1652 words)

  
 Forgotten Father of the Computer - The World and I Magazine
The reasons for the 32-year delay in the recognition of Atanasoff are mostly the dislocations caused by World War II, which sidetracked Atanasoff and Berry from pursuing their computer project and to some degree kept Iowa State officials from patenting the ABC.
Although neither Atanasoff nor Berry was free to devote full time to the computer prototype, it moved forward with amazing speed.
As Atanasoff and Berry started work on that project in early 1940, Atanasoff took considerable ribbing from some of his less imaginative friends of the faculty.
www.worldandi.com /public/1990/march/ns6.cfm   (2630 words)

  
 DIY Calculator :: First Electronic Computers
The bottom line was an official ruling that John Vincent Atanasoff and Clifford Berry had constructed the first electronic digital computer at Iowa State College between 1939 and 1942.
Working alongside one of his graduate students — the brilliant Clifford Berry (1918-1963) — Atanasoff commenced work on an electronic computer in early 1939, and had a prototype machine by the autumn of that year (this machine was called the Atanasoff-Berry Computer, or ABC for short).
Atanasoff’s design utilized capacitors to store electrical charge that could represent numbers in the form of logic 0s and logic 1s.
www.diycalculator.com /popup-h-eleccomp.shtml   (2445 words)

  
 Clifford Berry -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article
Clifford Berry (1918- 1963) helped (additional info and facts about John Vincent Atanasoff) John Vincent Atanasoff create the first digital electronic (A machine for performing calculations automatically) computers in 1939- the (additional info and facts about Atanasoff Berry Computer) Atanasoff Berry Computer (ABC).
Clifford Berry -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/c/cl/clifford_berry.htm   (53 words)

  
 Department of Computer Science: Iowa State University
Clark Mollenhoff in his book, Atanasoff, Forgotten Father of the Computer, details the design and construction of the Atanasoff-Berry Computer with emphasis on the relationships of the individuals.
Inventors of the Modern Computer: Atanasoff and Berry
Alice and Arthur Burks in their book, The First Electronic Computer: The Atanasoff Story, describe the design and construction of the ABC and provide a more technical perspective.
www.cs.iastate.edu /jva/jva-archive.shtml   (260 words)

  
 John Vincent Atanasoff
Atanasoff became associate professor of Iowa State College in 1936 where he built the prototype to the ABC (Atanasoff-Berry Computer) with his graduate assistant, Clifford Berry in the years 1939-42.
John Vincent Atanasoff was the first to build the electronic digital computer.
The computer was important because it was the first to use electronic means to manipulate binary numbers and several comcepts of Atanasoff are still relevant to day.
www.wellesley.edu /CS/courses/CS110/History/JohnVincentAtanasoff.html   (260 words)

  
 John Atanasoff - Construction
For the next two years, Atanasoff and Berry worked at developing and improving their computer- which he later named the ABC, Atanasoff-Berry Computer.
Atanasoff left Iowa State on leave for a defense-related position, Chief of the Acoustics Division at the Naval Ordnance Laboratory in Washington, D.C. In 1945, he was awarded the U.S. Navy Distinguished Service Award, the Navy's highest honor awarded to civilians.
Atanasoff worked on his ideas over the next year.
www.wiu.edu /users/mfbdw/jva/html/story3.htm   (260 words)

  
 News
Berry's background in electrical engineering served him well as he assisted John Vincent Atanasoff in building both the prototype for the computer and the full-scale machine, called the Atanasoff-Berry Computer (ABC).
While a graduate student, Berry played an instrumental role in the design and construction of the original computer by developing the assembly procedure for the logic circuit, which was digital rather than analog.
Clifford Berry received a B.S. in electrical engineering (1939), and his M.S. (1941) and Ph.D. (1948) degrees in physics from Iowa State.
www.iastate.edu /news/releases/97/bios.html   (706 words)

  
 Marston Muses, Spring 2000
Berry received his B.S. in electrical engineering from Iowa State in 1939 and had just joined the graduate program when Atanasoff asked him to work on the computer project.
He came highly recommended to Atanasoff through a colleague, Harry Anderson, who called Berry a “brilliant student” ideally suited for the computer-machine project.
Berry was creative, amazingly adept at computer concepts, and able to manage complex problems with little outside assistance.
www.eng.iastate.edu /muses/spring00/comproj.html   (413 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Search View - ENIAC
Between 1939 and 1942, John Atanasoff, a physics and mathematics professor at Iowa State University, and his graduate student Clifford Berry, assembled the Atanasoff-Berry Computer, which incorporated many digital circuit design innovations.
Finally, in 1973, a federal judge invalidated the ENIAC patent and awarded recognition to Atanasoff and Berry, more than 30 years after their pioneering accomplishments.
Their system used the binary arithmetic system of 1s and 0s commonly used in today’s computers as well as a memory drum that stored data in a method similar to the storage technique used in modern memory chips.
encarta.msn.com /text_761587960__1/ENIAC.html   (667 words)

  
 John Atanasoff - Recognition
In a formal opinion distributed on October 19, 1973, U.S. District Judge Earl R. Larson ruled that Atanasoff and Berry had constructed the first electronic digital computer at Iowa State University in the 1939- 1942 period.
Official recognition of John Vincent Atanasoff's achievement came slowly - several decades after he and Clifford Berry built the first electronic digital computer.
This recognition came at the end of a lengthy federal trial in which the patent for the electronic digital computer, held by John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert, was overturned.
www.augustana.edu /users/arwalters/jva/html/story4.htm   (667 words)

  
 John Vincent Atanasoff
Atanasoff became associate professor of Iowa State College in 1936 where he built the prototype to the ABC (Atanasoff-Berry Computer) with his graduate assistant, Clifford Berry in the years 1939-42.
John Vincent Atanasoff was the first to build the electronic digital computer.
The computer was important because it was the first to use electronic means to manipulate binary numbers and several comcepts of Atanasoff are still relevant to day.
www.wellesley.edu /CS/courses/CS110/History/JohnVincentAtanasoff.html   (667 words)

  
 eniac.txt
The ABC computer itself was partly constructed from 1939 to 1942, although, because of the onset of World War II, Atanasoff and Berry discontinued work before the completion of the computer.
The ABC was named after Atanasoff and his graduate assistant, Clifford E. Berry, who worked with him from 1939 to 1942.
The prototype was built in a couple of months, being operational by October 1939, for the purpose of testing two ideas central to Atanasoff's design: capacitors to store data in binary form and electronic logic circuits to perform addition and subtraction.
www.mdstud.chalmers.se /~md2nicke/MISSUPPFATTNINGAR/eniac.txt   (406 words)

  
 MS 267 Henry Hanson papers
The Atanasoff Berry Computer was built by Iowa State College (University) physics professor John V. Atanasoff and physics graduate student Clifford E. Berry.
Honeywell Incorporated was trying to establish that Mauchly had obtained important concepts used in the ENIAC from examination of a device known as the Atanasoff Berry Computer, or ABC, during a visit to Ames, Iowa in June of 1941.
Berry graduated in 1941 and took a job in California.
www.lib.iastate.edu:9060 /manuscripts/MS267.html   (1879 words)

  
 John Vincent Atanasoff
Atanasoff became associate professor of Iowa State College in 1936 where he built the prototype to the ABC (Atanasoff-Berry Computer) with his graduate assistant, Clifford Berry in the years 1939-42.
John Vincent Atanasoff was the first to build the electronic digital computer.
The computer was important because it was the first to use electronic means to manipulate binary numbers and several comcepts of Atanasoff are still relevant to day.
www.wellesley.edu /CS/courses/CS110/History/JohnVincentAtanasoff.html   (202 words)

  
 John Atanasoff - Recognition
Official recognition of John Vincent Atanasoff's achievement came slowly - several decades after he and Clifford Berry built the first electronic digital computer.
In a formal opinion distributed on October 19, 1973, U.S. District Judge Earl R. Larson ruled that Atanasoff and Berry had constructed the first electronic digital computer at Iowa State University in the 1939- 1942 period.
This recognition came at the end of a lengthy federal trial in which the patent for the electronic digital computer, held by John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert, was overturned.
www.wiu.edu /users/mfbdw/jva/html/story4.htm   (149 words)

  
 engv3n1.txt
If Atanasoff and Berry's work had not been interrupted by the Second World War, it might have resulted in a complete and operable digital computer; but in 1942 the collaborators were obliged to close down the project.
At Iowa State University in 1938 Atanasoff began a collaboration with a graduate student in mathematics, Clifford E. Berry, with the goal of building an electronic digital computer.
[10] Michael D Green, Bert E Forbes, "An economical full-scale multipurpose computer system," HP Journal (January 1973):2-8.
www.chac.org /engine-ascii/engv3n1.txt   (17349 words)

  
 Bulgaria Presents "John Atanasoff" Award
John Atanasoff, who is son of a Bulgarian immigrant from Bulgaria's village of Boyadjik in the Yambol Region, built the world's first electronic digital computer at US Iowa State University during 1937-42 together with his assistant Clifford Berry.
Bulgaria's President Georgi Parvanov will present for the first time the yearly John Atanasoff award given for special achievements in the filed of computer engineering.
Their creation incorporated several major innovations in computing including the use of binary arithmetic, regenerative memory, parallel processing and separation of memory and computing functions.
www.novinite.com /view_news.php?id=39940   (17349 words)

  
 jvadies.txt
Atanasoff was a faculty member of Iowa State College in the 1930s when he and engineering graduate student Clifford Berry invented the Atanasoff-Berry Computer.
It was not until 1973 that a federal judge ruled in a patent infringement lawsuit that Atanasoff's research was the source for most of the ideas for the modern computer.
In this respect, Atanasoff was about 50 years ahead of his time." Recognition for his extraordinary achievement eluded Atanasoff for nearly three decades.
www.iastate.edu /IaStater/1995/95stories/sept/jvadies.txt   (17349 words)

  
 Anatasoff Berry Computer
Atanasoff and graduate student Clifford Berry built a prototype ABC (Atanasoff-Berry Computer) in 1939, and a full-scale model in 1942.
The ABC was the first of several proposals to use electronics for calculation or logic in the decade after Atanasoff began investigations in 1935.
Like the Bell Labs Model I, the ABC was not a computer in the modern sense, since it lacked program control and was not general purpose.
www.thocp.net /hardware/abc.html   (17349 words)

  
 A Chronology of Digital Computing Machines (to 1952)
John V. Atanasoff (1903-95) and graduate student Clifford Berry (1918-63), of Iowa State College (now the Iowa State University), Ames, Iowa, complete a prototype 25-bit adder.
John von Neumann (1903-57), having joined the ENIAC team, drafts a report describing the future computer eventually built as the "EDVAC" ("Electronic Discrete Variable Automatic Computer" (!)); this is the first detailed description of the design of a stored-program computer, and gives rise to the term "von Neumann computer".
(Atanasoff will leave Iowa State after the US enters the war, and this will end his work on digital computing machines.
www.davros.org /misc/chronology.html   (17349 words)

  
 FIRSTS
In 1939, he worked with Clifford Berry, a graduate student, on an electronic digital computer, he later called the "Atanasoff-Berry Computer" (ABC), at Iowa State University.
Clifford Stoll has given talks on computer security to the U.S. Senate, the FBI, the CIA, and the NSA.
While a student at MIT, Ivan Sutherland developed "Sketchpad," a conversational computer graphics system, utilizing a console and a light pen.
www.computermuseum.li /Testpage/01HISTORYCD-Individuals.htm   (17275 words)

  
 ENIAC Trial Exhibits Master Collection,
Sperry Rand contented that the ENIAC was solely the invention of Eckert and Mauchly; however, Honeywell stated that Eckert and Mauchly had taken the idea from John Vincent Atanasoff and his assistant Clifford E. Berry.
Building upon the basic historical view that all inventions are the result of the work of many people over time, Honeywell capitalized upon a visit Mauchly made in 1941 to Atanasoff.
Their most important presentation related to the research of John Vincent Atanasoff at Iowa State College and the degree of contact and exchange between Mauchly and Atanasoff.
special.lib.umn.edu /cbi/collections/inv/cbi00145.html   (2913 words)

  
 Penn Special Collections-Mauchly Exhibition 7
The first of these concerned the contributions of an Iowa State College professor, John V. Atanasoff, who had designed and built an electronic computing device between 1937 and 1942 with the assistance of his graduate student, Clifford Berry.
Mauchly may have continued to draw ideas from Atanasoff's further reflections on electronic computing, but it was ultimately Mauchly who, working with Eckert, designed the first general- purpose electronic computer.
The controversy has been over the extent to which Mauchly borrowed Atanasoff's ideas, and whether Atanasoff was the true inventor of the modern electronic computer.
www.library.upenn.edu /special/gallery/mauchly/jwm7.html   (2913 words)

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