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Topic: Atlantic slave trade


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  Atlantic Slave Trade - MSN Encarta
Atlantic Slave Trade, the forced transportation of at least 10 million enslaved Africans from their homelands in Africa to destinations in Europe and the Americas during the 15th through 19th centuries.
The Atlantic slave trade involved the largest intercontinental migration of people in world history prior to the 20th century.
The Atlantic slave trade began because a great demand for labor developed on plantations spread about the Atlantic, especially in the tropics of the Western Hemisphere.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761595721/Atlantic_Slave_Trade.html   (1070 words)

  
  History of slavery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The slave trade from East Africa to Arabia was dominated by Arab and African traders in the coastal cities of Zanzibar, Dar Es Salaam and Mombasa.
Slave children apparently enjoyed some authoritative protection, as a letter from the 18th dynasty records limits to their use for harsh labor, and Egyptian households further bore the responsibility of adequately raising children of slave parents.
The transatlantic slave trade peaked in the late 18th century, when the largest number of slaves were captured on raiding expeditions into the interior of West Africa.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Slave_trade   (6238 words)

  
 Atlantic slave trade - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The slaves were one element of a three-part economic cycle—the Triangular Trade and its infamous Middle Passage—which ultimately involved four continents, four centuries and the lives and fortunes of millions of people.
The slave trade was part of the triangular Atlantic trade, which was probably the most important and profitable trading route in the world.
In the 18th century, the slave trade was an integral part of the Atlantic economy: the economies of the European colonies in the Caribbean, the American colonies, and Brazil required vast amounts of man power to harvest the bountiful agricultural goods.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Atlantic_slave_trade   (3506 words)

  
 New Georgia Encyclopedia: Atlantic Slave Trade to Savannah
The demand for African slave labor increased with the establishment of rice and Sea Island cotton plantations in the Georgia Lowcountry.
During the early period of Savannah's involvement in the trade, from 1755 to 1767, 63 percent of slaves imported into Savannah originated from the Caribbean, and 24 percent came directly from Africa's rice and grain coast.
The duration of the voyage combined with the prolonged confinement of slaves increased the occurrence of infectious diseases.
www.georgiaencyclopedia.org /nge/Article.jsp?id=h-686   (1090 words)

  
 Atlantic Slave Trade - Printer-friendly - MSN Encarta
The Atlantic slave trade began as a trickle in the 1440s and grew slowly through the 17th century.
Most of the slaves transported in the Atlantic slave trade were adult men.
Nearly all persons transported across the Atlantic in the slave trade came from the coast and interior of west and west central Africa, between the Sénégal River in the north and southern Angola in the south.
encarta.msn.com /text_761595721___2/Atlantic_Slave_Trade.html   (867 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The slaves were tortured for the purpose of "breaking" them (like the practice of breaking horses) and conditioning them to their new lot in life.
The first Europeans to use African slaves in the New World were the Spaniards who sought auxiliaries for their conquest expeditions and laborers on islands such as Cuba and Hispaniola, where the alarming decline in the native population had spurred the first royal laws protecting the native population (Laws of Burgos, 1512-1513).
In the 18th century, the slave trade was an integral part of the Atlantic economy: the economies of the European colonies in the Caribbean, the American colonies, and Brazil required vast amounts of man power to harvest the bountiful agricultural goods.
stron.frm.pl /wiki.php?title=Atlantic_slave_trade   (6185 words)

  
 The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
It is estimated that during the 4 1/2 centuries of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, Portugal was responsible for transporting over 4.5 million Africans (roughly 40% of the total).
During the eighteenth century however, when the slave trade accounted for the transport of a staggering 6 million Africans, Britain was the worst transgressor - responsible for almost 2.5 million.
Slaves obtained from the Muslim dominated North African coast however proved to be too well educated to be trusted and had a tendency to rebellion.
www.capoeira.co.za /index_files/arta1.htm   (467 words)

  
 The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade: a Forgotten Crime Against Humanity
The signatories to this Convention acknowledged that slave trading and slavery failed to be eradicated throughout the international community and thus implemented additional guidelines regarding this inhumane institution.
Generally, the acts of the slave trade fall under the Rome Statute's definition of a "crime against humanity." The Trans-Atlantic slave trade was a systematic attack against the African population.
We affirm that the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and the enslavement of Africans and African Descendants was a crime against humanity and a unique tragedy in the history of humanity, and that its roots and bases were economic, institutional, systemic and transnational in dimension.
academic.udayton.edu /race/02rights/slavery05.htm   (3419 words)

  
 Timeline: The Atlantic Slave Trade   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
At the Congress of Vienna, the British pressure Spain, Portugal, France and the Netherlands to agree to abolish the slave trade (though Spain and Portugal are permitted a few years of continued slaving to replenish labor supplies).
September 23: Great Britain and Spain sign a treaty prohibiting the slave trade: Spain agrees to end the slave trade north of the equator immediately, and south of the equator in 1820.
June 28: The Anglo-Spanish agreement on the slave trade is renewed, and enforcement is tightened.
amistad.mysticseaport.org /timeline/atlantic.slave.trade.html   (898 words)

  
 Badagry and Trans- Atlantic Slave Trade
The Trans- Atlantic slave trade was the cruelest form of slavery; this was the purchase and transport of Africans into bondage and servitude in the new world.
When slaves were auctioned by different slave merchants, all slaves will be marched down to their various cells in different part of badagry usually along the coast, here they remained for 3 months under terrible conditions, chained from head to toes, they defecate and urinate in their various cells until they were released for shipment.
Slaves were jam-packed at the lower deck of the slave ship, head facing upward, chained from head to heads just make sure all spaces are filled up, they urinate and defecate at the lower deck of and were subjected to all kind of torture.
www.mobeetoursinternational.4t.com /custom3.html   (2843 words)

  
 The Slave Trade   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Today, we take it for granted that issues of trade are often imbued with moral issues, we continually mix politics and economics, but in 1806 and 1807 legislators had to find a way to cope with the moral, as well as commercial and constitutional implications of abolishing the slave trade.
As we have seen from the case study of the 1808 law prohibiting the importation of slaves, the slave trade was an issue not easily defined and confronted.
Abolition of the slave trade, although legally applicable to the entire United States, primarily affected the Southern states where slavery was still legal, because slaves were not usually brought to ports of a free state.
www.american.edu /projects/mandala/TED/slave.htm   (2905 words)

  
 Atlantic slave trade information - Search.com
The Atlantic slave trade (Atlantic slave trading) was the purchase and transport of fl Africans into bondage and servitude in the New World.
The slaves were one element of a three-part economic cycle—the Triangular Trade and its infamous Middle Passage—which ultimately involved four continents, four centuries and the lives and fortunes of millions of people.
The slave trade was part of the triangular Atlantic trade, which was probably the most important and profitable trading route in the world.
www.search.com /reference/Atlantic_slave_trade   (3034 words)

  
 The Atlantic Slave Trade
The history of the Atlantic slave trade could be characterised as the first bloody essay into globalisation.
The racist ideologies of the early 19th century were thus rooted in the slave trade and in turn materially affected the fate of Africans everywhere.
It empowered regimes brutal enough to extort taxes or slaves from their neighbours and engendered the spread of domestic slavery as increasing numbers of people were needed to grow crops to feed those slaves awaiting export.
www.nathanielturner.com /atlanticslavetrade.htm   (939 words)

  
 The Slave Trade - Middle Passage - African-American History Through the Arts
Slaves were revolting and tried to flee the hardships of labor.
A federal law, which was passed in 1793, allowed for the Fugitive Slave Act, which continued the slave trade and prohibited the freedom of the Africans.
Before the Middle Passage began a slave trade already existed in Africa, but this slave trade was much different than the one that Europe would create for the Africans as the Atlantic World developed.
cghs.dade.k12.fl.us /african-american/europe/slave_trade.htm   (1348 words)

  
 African American Odyssey: Slavery--The Peculiar Institution (Part 1)
The European, American, and African slave traders engaged in the lucrative trade in humans, and the politicians and businessmen who supported them, did not intend to put into motion a chain of events that would motivate the captives and their descendants to fight for full citizenship in the United States of America.
Slaves were then transported across the Atlantic--the infamous middle passage--primarily to Brazil and the Caribbean, where they were sold.
During the 1700s when the Atlantic slave trade was flourishing, West Africans accounted for approximately two-thirds of the African captives imported into the Americas.
lcweb2.loc.gov /ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aopart1.html   (1516 words)

  
 Atlantic slave trade Totally Explained
The first slaves to arrive as part of a labor force appeared in 1502 on the island of Santo Domingo now modern Haiti and the Dominican Republic.
Although moral, economic and political opposition developed against the slave trade, this was largely ineffective unless combined with the political factor of African rebellions.
The single most significant event in the history of the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade and slavery was the Haitian Revolution, led by people such as Toussaint L'Ouverture and Jean-Jacques Dessalines.
atlantic_slave_trade.totallyexplained.com   (4676 words)

  
 African American Odyssey: Slavery--The Peculiar Institution (Part 1)
The European, American, and African slave traders engaged in the lucrative trade in humans, and the politicians and businessmen who supported them, did not intend to put into motion a chain of events that would motivate the captives and their descendants to fight for full citizenship in the United States of America.
Slaves were then transported across the Atlantic--the infamous middle passage--primarily to Brazil and the Caribbean, where they were sold.
During the 1700s when the Atlantic slave trade was flourishing, West Africans accounted for approximately two-thirds of the African captives imported into the Americas.
memory.loc.gov /ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aopart1.html   (1516 words)

  
 The Atlantic Slave Trade was the process by which an estimated 12 million Africans were taken from their homeland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Africans in the interior of Africa were primarily made slaves through tribal warfare and then brought to the west coast of Africa where they were placed in "forts" until their sale to European slave traders.
African tribes played a significant role in the Atlantic Slave Trade in capturing Africans in the interior and as the role of "middlemen" in the trading of slaves to Europeans.
Slaves, upon arriving in the New World, were prepared for sale and usually auctioned off.
www.runet.edu /~shepburn/atlantic_slave_trade.htm   (236 words)

  
 WowEssays.com - Atlantic Slave Trade
Effects of the Atlantic Slave Trade The changes in African life during the slave trade era form an important element in the economic and technological development of Africa.
Although the Atlantic slave trade had a negative effect on both the economy and technology, it is important to understand that slavery was not a new concept to Africa.
The effects of slave trade soon led to civil wars, kidnappings, and disruptions, which brought about the decline of the existing kingdoms on the one had and the rise of new but smaller ones on the other.
www.wowessays.com /dbase/aa2/lpf50.shtml   (935 words)

  
 Timeline: The Atlantic Slave Trade
At the Congress of Vienna, the British pressure Spain, Portugal, France and the Netherlands to agree to abolish the slave trade (though Spain and Portugal are permitted a few years of continued slaving to replenish labor supplies).
September 23: Great Britain and Spain sign a treaty prohibiting the slave trade: Spain agrees to end the slave trade north of the equator immediately, and south of the equator in 1820.
June 28: The Anglo-Spanish agreement on the slave trade is renewed, and enforcement is tightened.
academic.sun.ac.za /forlang/bergman/real/amistad/history/msp/t_slave.htm   (898 words)

  
 BBC News | AFRICA | Focus on the slave trade
The slave trade contributed significantly to the commercial and industrial revolutions.
Slave narratives offering an African perspective on the slave trade contributed to the growing anti-slavery movement.
Britain banned the slave trade in 1807 but a fierce debate in the United States, which stoked civil war between the abolitionist northern states and the pro-slavery south, delayed a unified resolution.
news.bbc.co.uk /1/hi/world/africa/1523100.stm   (718 words)

  
 Wonders of the African World - Episodes - Slave Kingdoms
Precolonial empires such as Dahomey and Ashanti (located in what is now Benin and Ghana), where slave ports at Ouidah and Elmina flourished, accumulated enormous wealth and power as a result of the trade of their fellow Africans.
Domestic slave ownership as well as domestic and international slave trades in western Africa preceded the late 15th-century origins of the Atlantic slave trade.
Understanding the dynamics of African complicity in the slave trade is important in understanding Africans as historically active and diverse human beings.
www.pbs.org /wonders/Episodes/Epi3/slave_2.htm   (922 words)

  
 Atlantic Slave Trade: Miscellaneous
Some colonial assemblies in the 1760s and early 1770s repeatedly sought to restrict importations by imposing tariffs and customs duties, nearly all of which were vetoed by royal governors and the Crown.
The different ethnic groups brought to the Americas closely corresponds to the regions of heaviest activity in the slave trade.
On the outset, Spielberg must be congratulated for bringing to life one of the darkest chapters in human history,--the slave trade and servitude, and the universal human instinct to seek freedom.
www.lycos.com /info/atlantic-slave-trade--miscellaneous.html   (368 words)

  
 The Story of Africa| BBC World Service
This new transatlantic slave trade was very different from the kind of slavery that had existed before.
No slaves married their masters or mistresses in the Americas, although there were secret relationships, usually forced upon the slave.
Whether badly or well treated, slaves were, in American society at large, marked out and despised for the colour of their skin, and so were their descendants.
www.bbc.co.uk /worldservice/africa/features/storyofafrica/9chapter4.shtml   (1225 words)

  
 Atlantic Slave Trade Real
Slaves were taken from almost anywhere in Africa that was willing to sell slaves.
When the slave ship came, the slaves would be put onto the ship and taken across the ocean.
The slaves that the Africans gave to the Europeans were usually captured in tribal warfare or by illegal means.
www.lakesideschool.org /studentweb/worldhistory/globalcontactse/AtlanticSlaveTrade.htm   (823 words)

  
 The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade: From Africa to Europe
European Role In The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade In the late 15th century, the Portuguese were the first Europeans to extensively explore the African Coast.
Trade with the coastal West African middlemen included cowry shells and hardware (cooking pots and brass pans and iron rods) in exchange for the gold, slaves, ivory, pepper, gum Arabic, and ostrich feathers.
European trade with the coastal Africans attracted many Africans from the interior and diverted the flow of trade across the Sahara to the Atlantic Coast of West Africa.
library.advanced.org /13406/ta/2.htm   (1485 words)

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