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Topic: Atomic force microscope


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In the News (Wed 19 Jun 19)

  
  Atomic Force Microscope
The AFM works by scanning a fine ceramic or semiconductor tip over a surface much the same way as a phonograph needle scans a record (for those of you that remember what a record player was!).
AFM is being used to solve processing and materials problems in a wide range of technologies affecting the electronics, telecommunications, biological, chemical, automotive, aerospace, and energy industries.
The AFM is being applied to studies of phenomena such as abrasion, adhesion, cleaning, corrosion, etching, friction, lubrication, plating, and polishing.
www.che.utoledo.edu /nadarajah/webpages/whatsafm.html   (367 words)

  
  How does an Atomic Force Microscope work??
An atomic force microscope, or AFM, is an instrument for mapping and measuring surface features of extremely small objects - from a carbon atom that is 0.25 nanometers (nm) or 2.5 Angstroms in diameter to a cross section of human hair (approximately 80 microns in diameter).
In non-contact mode, the atomic force microscope's probe does not touch the surface of the sample; it measures attractive forces between the tip and the surface to draw a topographic map of the surface.
atomic force microscope is quite new and still has some bugs but it is currently being used for a wide range of study in the electronics, chemical and biological fields including such esoteric subjects as abrasion and adhesion, cleaning and corrosion, as well as a host of other applications.
www.tech-faq.com /atomic-force-microscope.shtml   (489 words)

  
  Atomic force microscope and method for determining properties of a sample surface using an atomic force microscope - ...
A method for determining properties of a sample surface using an atomic force microscope includes applying a first voltage between the sample and a probe, moving the probe towards the surface of the sample, and stopping movement of the probe towards the surface of the sample when current in the probe is initially detected.
The atomic force microscope of claim 9, wherein the means for applying a magnetic field applies a magnetic field to the probe after the means for stopping movement of the probe stops movement of the probe towards the sample surface.
The atomic force microscope of claim 15, wherein the means for oscillating the probe oscillates the probe with an amplitude of 200 Oe and a frequency of 5 Hz for a duration of 2 cycles.
www.freepatentsonline.com /7009414.html   (1913 words)

  
 Atomic force microscope (AFM) is optimized for measuring surface features
The constant force is maintained by measuring the force with the "light lever" sensor and using a feedback control electronic circuit to control the position of the Z piezoelectric ceramic.
The strongest forces between the probe and surface are mechanical, which are the forces that occur when the atoms on the probe physically interact with the atoms on a surface.
Because the deflection of the cantilever is directly proportional to the force on the surface, a constant force is applied to the surface during a scan.
nanoparticles.pacificnano.com /atomic-force-microscope.html   (2362 words)

  
 How AFM works
The atomic force microscope measures topography with a force probe
AFM (figure 1) operates by measuring attractive or repulsive forces between a tip and the sample (Binnig et al., 1986).
The ability of AFM to image at atomic resolution, combined with its ability to image a wide variety of samples under a wide variety of conditions, has created a great deal of interest in applying it to the study of biological structures.
stm2.nrl.navy.mil /how-afm/how-afm.html   (2596 words)

  
 [No title]
The underlying principle of the microscope is the tunneling of electrons between the sharp tip of a probe and the surface of the sample under study.
Animation shown the resonance mode of AFM operation, when the cantilever is excited with the constant frequency (equal to resonance frequency of the cantilever in the absence of the surface).
In constant-amplitude mode the amplitude of oscillation is kept constant by a regulation circuit that excites a piezoactuator with a sinusoidal voltage of the oscillation frequency f and an amplitude Vexc.
physics.nad.ru /Physics/English/afm_txt.htm   (1287 words)

  
 Atomic Force Microscope Design, Components and Operation - Supplier Data By Pacific Nanotechnology
The constant force is maintained by measuring the force with the "light lever" sensor and using a feedback control electronic circuit to control the position of the Z piezoelectric ceramic.
The strongest forces between the probe and surface are mechanical, which are the forces that occur when the atoms on the probe physically interact with the atoms on a surface.
Because the deflection of the cantilever is directly proportional to the force on the surface, a constant force is applied to the surface during a scan.
www.azom.com /Details.asp?ArticleID=3250   (2376 words)

  
  atomic force microscope - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
The force between the tip and the sample leads to a deflection of the cantilever according to Hooke's law.
In the contact mode operation, the force between the tip and the surface is kept constant during scanning by maintaining a constant deflection.
The dynamic mode generates lower lateral forces on the sample and is widely used to image biological samples.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/Atomic-force-microscope   (539 words)

  
 Atomic force microscope Summary
In 1985, the atomic force microscope (AFM) was invented by Gerd Binnig (co-inventor of the STM), Christoph Gerber in Zurich, Switzerland, and Calvin Quate in California.
In 1985, the atomic force microscope (AFM) was invented by Gerd Binnig (co-inventor of the Scanning tunneling microscope), Christoph Gerber in Zurich, Switzerland, and Calvin Quate in California.
The AFM consists of a microscale cantilever with a sharp tip (probe) at its end that is used to scan the specimen surface.
www.bookrags.com /Atomic_force_microscope   (2500 words)

  
 Theory and Simulation of SPM
The atomic force microscope (AFM) probes the surface of a sample with a sharp tip, a couple of microns long and often less than 100Å in diameter.
Forces between the tip and the sample surface cause the cantilever to bend, or deflect.
The force most commonly associated with atomic force microscopy is an interatomic force called the van der Waals force.
invsee.asu.edu /nmodules/spmmod/afm.html   (263 words)

  
 The Atomic Force Microscope
The basic objective of the operation of the AFM is to measure the forces (at the atomic level) between a sharp probing tip (which is attached to a cantilever spring) and a sample surface.
Forces in systems where resonance enhancement is extreme: for example metal tips on rough silver surfaces as in the giant Raman resonance experiment.
In fig.3, the AFM in biology: One rapidly evolving area in scanning force microscopy is the construction of tips to measure specific force interactions in cells.
www.cmth.ph.ic.ac.uk /photonics/intro/AFM.html   (735 words)

  
 Atomic Force Microscope
Atomic force Microscope (AFM) developed in the mid 90’s, uses electronics to measure the force exerted on the probe tip as it moves along the surface.
The nanoscope AFM head employs an optical detection system in which the tip is attached to the underside of a reflective cantilever.
The latter mode of operation requires calibration parameters of the scanning tip to be inserted in the sensitivity of the AFM head during force calibration of the microscope.
www.personal.psu.edu /sbk142/afm.htm   (262 words)

  
 Chapter 3 -- Atomic Force Microscopy
To achieve atomic scale resolution, a sharp stylus (radius ~1-2 nm) attached to a cantilever is used in the AFM to scan an object point by point and contouring it while a constant small force is applied to the stylus (Fig.
AFM topographs of purple membrane from Halobacterium salinarium.
As the cantilever force is increased to ~3x10-10 Newton, this prominent loop is mechanically bent toward the membrane surface (Fig.
www.mih.unibas.ch /Booklet/Booklet96/Chapter3/Chapter3.html   (1881 words)

  
 AAPPI - Process & Technology - Atomic Force Microscope
AFM, also referred to as SPM or Scanning Probe Microscopy, is a high-resolution imaging technique that can resolve features as small as an atomic lattice in the real space.
AFM works by bringing a cantilever tip in contact with the surface to be imaged.
By keeping the force constant while scanning the tip across the surface, the vertical movement of the tip follows the surface profile and is recorded as the surface topography by the AFM.
www.aappilabs.com /atomicforcemicro.html   (212 words)

  
 Introduction to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)
The atomic force microscope (AFM), or scanning force microscope (SFM) was invented in 1986 by Binnig, Quate and Gerber.
In the case of the AFM, the probe is a tip on the end of a cantilever which bends in response to the force between the tip and the sample.
Forces due to the chemical nature of the tip are probably most important here, and selection of a particular tip for its material can be important.
spm.phy.bris.ac.uk /techniques/AFM   (1533 words)

  
 Atomic force microscope   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The atomic force microscope (AFM) consists of a cantilever with a sharp tip at its end.
The force between the tip and the sample leads to a deflection of the cantilever according to Hooke's law.
Hence, in most cases a feedback mechanism is employed to adjust the tip-to-sample distance to keep the force between the tip and the sample constant.
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/a/at/atomic_force_microscope.html   (183 words)

  
 Adelaide Microscopy | Atomic Force Microscope
The atomic force microscope (AFM) probes the surface of a sample with a sharp tip, a few microns long and often less than 100Å in diameter.
The great advantage of an AFM is that it is able to operate in air but can also operate in vacuum or in a liquid.
In the non-contact regime, the cantilever is held on the order of tens to hundreds of angstroms from the sample surface, and the interatomic force between the cantilever and sample is attractive (largely a result of the long-range van der Waals interactions).
www.adelaide.edu.au /microscopy/services/instrumentation/afm.html   (814 words)

  
 Probe for atomic force microscope usable for scanning tunneling microscope - Patent 5353632
According to the invention, a probe for an atomic force microscope comprising a means for tunneling current is disclosed.
The present invention relates to a probe which can be used as in an atomic force microscope and is adaptable to a scanning tunneling microscope by installing the probe on the scanning tunneling microscope.
The present invention relates to a probe for use in an atomic force microscope which is used to scan the surface of a sample substrate.
www.freepatentsonline.com /5353632.html   (3485 words)

  
 The Atomic Force Microscope   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The basic objective of the operation of the AFM is to measure the forces (at the atomic level) between a sharp probing tip (which is attached to a cantilever spring) and a sample surface.
Forces in systems where resonance enhancement is extreme: for example metal tips on rough silver surfaces as in the giant Raman resonance experiment.
In fig.3, the AFM in biology: One rapidly evolving area in scanning force microscopy is the construction of tips to measure specific force interactions in cells.
www.sst.ph.ic.ac.uk /photonics/intro/AFM.html   (735 words)

  
 BFRL: ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY (AFM)
In atomic force microscopy (AFM), a probe consisting of a sharp tip (nominal tip radius on the order of 10 nm) located near the end of a cantilever beam is raster scanned across the sample surface using piezoelectric scanners.
One example is lateral force or friction force imaging, in which torsional rotation of the probe is detected while the probe is dragged across the surface in a direction perpendicular to the long axis of the cantilever.
The AFM (silicon or silicon nitride) tip is functionalized with a particular chemical species and scanned over the sample to detect differences in interaction forces between the species on the tip and those on the sample surface.
www.bfrl.nist.gov /nanoscience/BFRL_AFM.htm   (2006 words)

  
 Nanotechnology and the Atomic Force Microscope
In the contact mode operation, the force between the tip and the surface is kept constant during scanning by maintaining a constant deflection.
Unlike the electron microscope which provides a two-dimensional projection or a two-dimensional image of a sample, the AFM provides a true three-dimensional surface profile.
The main disadvantage that the AFM has compared to the electron microscope is the image size.
www.edinformatics.com /nanotechnology/atomic_force_microscope.htm   (427 words)

  
 orbitals: University of Utah News Release: June 2, 2003
The supercomputer calculations showed that to detect an atom’s orbitals, the atomic force microscope’s tip needs to be within 2 to 3 angstroms of the atoms being scanned – less than the diameter of an atom.
If atomic force microscopes can make images of atomic orbitals on the metal surface, engineers will be able to “see much more detail of the atoms and the bonds between them,” helping industry design better metals and catalysts for a wide variety of manufacturing processes.
Liu said his study involved using a supercomputer to simulate the use of an atomic force microscope to scan a surface of silicon atoms – the stuff of which computer semiconductor chips are made – using calculations that follow the rules of quantum mechanics, the theory that governs the motions of electrons.
web.utah.edu /unews/releases/03/jun/orbitals.html   (1296 words)

  
 Oscillator and method of making for atomic force microscope and other applications invention
[0003] An atomic force microscope usually utilizes a sharp stylus or tip which is caused to move over the surface or object under investigation or otherwise detect the surface or object to, for example, map the physical contour and/or the softness or hardness spectrum (derived from energy level) over the surface.
Thus, the atomic force microscope may be said to be more akin functionally to a record player reading the topography of a record than to the traditional notion of a "microscope." The atomic force microscope belongs to the family of microscopes known as scanning probe microscopes.
Moreover, the AFM can be used in liquid for scanning at atomic resolution, and it allows measurements of forces in the regimes of significance such as single molecule force spectroscopy.
www.freshpatents.com /Oscillator-and-method-of-making-for-atomic-force-microscope-and-other-applications-dt20070301ptan20070044545.php   (2353 words)

  
 OLYMPUS Atomic Force Microscope
An atomic force microscope (AFM) is a new instrument for imaging a sample surface.
Due to the sharper tip and small loading force, the lateral resolution in AFM is extremely improved in comparison with the conventional profilometer.
As a cantilever for DC mode AFM, the cantilever should be soft enough to reduce the loading force as much as possible.
probe.olympus-global.com /en/en/explnafmE.html   (410 words)

  
 Atomic Force Microscope
The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a useful tool that creates an image of the surface topology of the sample.
An atomically sharp tip is scanned over a surface with feedback mechanisms that enable the piezo-electric scanners to maintain the tip at a constant force (to obtain height information), or height (to obtain force information) above the sample surface.
Tapping mode AFM was developed as a method to achieve high resolution without inducing destructive frictional forces both in air and fluid.
www.polymer-physics.uwaterloo.ca /equipment/afm.htm   (340 words)

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