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Topic: Avaiyar


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In the News (Sat 25 Oct 14)

  
  Avaiyar's Vinayagar Agaval
Her namesake of the ancient Sangam age was the prototypical Mother Goose of South India who authored the canon of moral guidelines that still form a mainstay to children's education in contemporary Tamil Nadu.
The character of the Sangam Avaiyar sharply contrasts the Avaiyar of the 14
Avaiyar's experience of Ganesha manifesting as "a mother" is a sure sign on her crossing the line of Brahminically sanctioned tradition.
www.levity.com /alchemy/vinayaga.html   (512 words)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Avaiyar   (Site not responding. Last check: )
We present the poetry of a later Avaiyar, the 14th century author of the Vinayagar Agaval, a classic Tamil work that is recited in temples and homes.
Avaiyar's poetry seems to follow a tradition similar to that of the Tamil Siddhas, filled with occult references to the elaborate psycho-spiritual energetic systems of Kundalini Yoga, as well as the more heterodox goddess imagery of Tantrism.
Given the arcane and sometimes technical nature of Avaiyar's Vinayagar Agaval, it is surprising that it is particularly associated with worship of the elephant-headed god Ganesha, the jovial, fat-bellied god of bounty and overcoming obstacles -- not a god usually associated with the more elaborately technical approaches to yoga and spirituality.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Avaiyar   (410 words)

  
 Avaiyar   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Avaiyar is a female icon of Tamil literature.
She wrote many poems about Hindu gods, of which Vinayagar Agaval in praise of Lord Ganesha (the elephant god) is famous, and other great thoughts about disciplined human life.
It is also said that she was the cause of the poets of the Madurai Tamil Sangam to accept the great work of Thiruvalluvar - The Thirukural.
publicliterature.org /en/wikipedia/a/av/avaiyar.html   (143 words)

  
 Avaiyar : Poems and Biography
We present the poetry of a later Avaiyar, the 14th century author of the Vinayagar Agaval, a classic Tamil work that is recited in temples and homes.
Avaiyar's poetry seems to follow a tradition similar to that of the Tamil Siddhas, filled with occult references to the elaborate psycho-spiritual energetic systems of Kundalini Yoga, as well as the more heterodox goddess imagery of Tantrism.
Given the arcane and sometimes technical nature of Avaiyar's Vinayagar Agaval, it is surprising that it is particularly associated with worship of the elephant-headed god Ganesha, the jovial, fat-bellied god of bounty and overcoming obstacles -- not a god usually associated with the more elaborately technical approaches to yoga and spirituality.
www.poetry-chaikhana.com /A/Avaiyar   (0 words)

  
 Vinayaga Chathurthi Sunday September 15, 2007. - Sulekha philosophy Forums
The 14th century Avaiyar was perhaps the third female poet to assume this name, but the distinctive character of her work, the Vinayagar Agaval, has forever immortalized this obscure figure as a poetical giant in Tamil literary history.
The Vinayagar Agaval is recited in temples and homes at the shrines of the jovial elephant-headed god Ganesha (the mystical Janus of the Hindu pantheon) At first glance the work seems conservative enough; as it begins with the traditional contemplation of the god from foot to crown.
Turiya, or "the Sleepless Sleep" is a state of deep yogic trance, where the aspirant sleeps to the illusionary and transient realm of gross sense phenomena and wakes to the infinitude of the inner realm.
www.sulekha.com /groups/postdisplay.aspx?cid=119922&forumid=756949   (0 words)

  
 Avaiyar - Education - Information - Educational Resources - Encyclopedia - Music
Avaiyar is a female icon of Tamil literature.
She wrote many poems about Hindu gods, of which Vinayagar Agaval in praise of Lord Ganesha (the elephant god) is famous, and other great thoughts about disciplined human life.
It is also said that she was the cause of the poets of the Madurai Tamil Sangam to accept the great work of Thiruvalluvar - The Thirukural.
www.music.us /education/A/Avaiyar.htm   (447 words)

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