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Topic: Ayub Khan


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In the News (Tue 21 May 19)

  
  Ayub Khan - LoveToKnow 1911
AYUB KHAN (1855-), Afghan prince, son of Shere Ali (formerly amir of Afghanistan), and cousin of the amir Abdur Rahman, was born about 1855.
He encountered the British force commanded by General Burrows at Maiwand on the 27th of July, and was able to gain one of the very few pitched battles that have been won by Asiatic leaders over an army under European direction.
In the summer of 1881 he again invaded Afghanistan, and on the anniversary of the battle of Maiwand obtained a signal victory over Abdur Rahman's lieutenants, mainly through the defection of a Durani regiment.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Ayub_Khan   (248 words)

  
 Pakistan - AYUB KHAN
Ayub Khan probably was selected because of his reputation as an able administrator, his presumed lack of political ambition, and his lack of powerful group backing.
Ayub Khan's martial law regime, critics observed, was a form of "representational dictatorship," but the new political system, introduced in 1959 as "Basic Democracy," was an apt expression of what Ayub Khan called the particular "genius" of Pakistan.
Ayub Khan was the architect of Pakistan's policy of close alignment with the United States, and his first major foreign policy act was to sign bilateral economic and military agreements with the United States in 1959.
countrystudies.us /pakistan/18.htm   (3596 words)

  
  WORLD ENCYCLOPAEDIA - Pakistan - AYUB KHAN | encyclopaedic.net
Ayub Khan probably was selected because of his reputation as an able administrator, his presumed lack of political ambition, and his lack of powerful group backing.
Ayub Khan's martial law regime, critics observed, was a form of "representational dictatorship," but the new political system, introduced in 1959 as "Basic Democracy," was an apt expression of what Ayub Khan called the particular "genius" of Pakistan.
Ayub Khan was the architect of Pakistan's policy of close alignment with the United States, and his first major foreign policy act was to sign bilateral economic and military agreements with the United States in 1959.
encyclopaedic.net /world-encyclopaedia/pakistan/18.html   (3656 words)

  
 Muhammad Ayub Khan
Muhammad Ayub Khan was born on May 14, 1907, in the village of Rehana near Haripur, in Hazara District.
Ayub's performance in Sandhurst was exemplary and he won several scholarships.
At the time of Independence, Ayub Khan opted to join the Pakistan Army, where as a Brigadier, he was the senior-most Muslim officer.
www.storyofpakistan.com /person.asp?perid=P017   (288 words)

  
 Ayub Khan information - Search.com
Khan was born in the village of Rehana near Haripur Hazara to an ethnic Pashtun family of the Tareen clan, the first child of the second wife of Mir Dad Khan, who was a Risaldar Major in Hodson's Horse.
Ayub Khan was made Commander-in-Chief of the Pakistan Army on January 17, 1951, succeeding General Sir Douglas Gracey, thus becoming the first native Pakistani general to hold that position.
It was under Ayub Khan that the capital was moved from Karachi to Rawalpindi, in anticipation of the construction of a new capital: Islamabad.
domainhelp.search.com /reference/Ayub_Khan   (1000 words)

  
  Bambooweb: Ayub Khan
Khan was born in 1907 in the village of Rehana, to Mir Dad Khan.
Ayub Khan was later made Commander in Chief of the Pakistani Army, becoming the first non-British general to hold that position in 1951.
It was under Ayub Khan that the capital was moved from Karachi to Rawalpindi in anticipation of the construction of a new capital: Islamabad.
www.bambooweb.com /articles/a/y/Ayub_Khan.html   (485 words)

  
  Ayub Khan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Khan was born in the village of Rehana near Haripur Hazara to a Hindko speaking Pashtun family of the Tareen tribe, the first child of the second wife of Mir Dad Khan, who was a Risaldar Major in Hodson's Horse.
Ayub Khan was made Commander-in-Chief of the Pakistan Army on January 17, 1951, succeeding General Sir Douglas Gracey, thus becoming the first native Pakistani general to hold that position.
It was under Ayub Khan that the capital was moved from Karachi to Rawalpindi, in anticipation of the construction of a new capital: Islamabad.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ayub_Khan   (1104 words)

  
 Ayub Khan (Afghan commander) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ayub Khan (1857 (Kabul) - April 7, 1914 (Lahore) was also known as The Victor of Maiwand or The Afghan Prince Charlie and was, for a while, the governor of Herat.
His father was Sher Ali Khan and his mother was the daughter of an influential Mohmand chief of Lalpura, Saadat Khan.
In 1888 Ayub Khan left Persia (now Iran), where he had escaped to, and became a pensioner in British India until his death in 1914.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ayub_Khan_(Afghan_commander)   (201 words)

  
 Ayub Khan - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Muhammad Ayub Khan (Urdu / Pashto : محمد ايوب خان) HJ, NPk (May 14, 1907 – April 19, 1974) was a Field Marshal during the mid- 1960s, and the political leader of...
Ayub Khan-Din (1961 -) is a playwright and actor, who was born in Salford, Lancashire, England.
Muhammad Ayub Khan was born on May 14, 1907, in the village of Rehana near Haripur, in Hazara District.
encarta.msn.com /Ayub_Khan.html   (201 words)

  
 Ayub Khan - Wikipedia Mirror
Muhammad Ayub Khan (Urdu: محمد ايوب خان) (May 14, 1907 – April 19, 1974) was a Field Marshal during the mid-1960s, and the political leader of Pakistan from 1958 to 1969.
Khan was born in the village of Rehana near Haripur Hazara to an ethnic Pashtun family of the Tareen clan, the first child of the second wife of Mir Dad Khan, who was a Risaldar Major in Hodson's Horse.
Ayub Khan was made Commander-in-Chief of the Pakistan Army on January 17, 1951, succeeding General Sir Douglas Gracey, thus becoming the first native Pakistani general to hold that position.
www.wiki-mirror.be /index.php?title=Ayub_Khan   (1081 words)

  
 Ayub Khan Muhammad - Search Results - ninemsn Encarta
Ayub Khan, Muhammad (1907-1974), president of Pakistan (1958-1969).
Muhammad Ayub Khan was a former officer in the British...
PA - 10) Muhammad Ayub Khan (Urdu / Pashto : محمد ايوب خان) HJ, NPk (May 14, 1907 – April 19, 1974) was a Field Marshal during the mid- 1960s, and the political...
au.encarta.msn.com /Ayub_Khan_Muhammad.html   (164 words)

  
 Ayub Khan, a quintessence of evil, chastised Bangalees in his second book erroneously   A.H. Jaffor Ullah
Ayub Khan being groomed at military academy in his youth had not studied the great culture of Eastern India (Maghad’s Gupta dynasty) that was based in Pataliputra nearly two thousand years ago.
Ayub Khan was living in the past for in 1930s and early 1940s the idea that Bengali Muslims should forgo their mother tongue, Bangla, and learn Urdu to steep in Muslim culture was gaining strength in certain quarters.
Ayub Khan’s comments that he made during 1960s vis-à-vis Bangalee people of East Pakistan regarding their love for their mother tongue and the sacrifice that they made in 1952 will paint a bleak picture of this military man who went to Sandhurst, U.K. in his youth to become a man in uniform.
www.mukto-mona.com /Articles/jaffor/Ayub_book250607.htm   (1319 words)

  
 Muhammad Ayub Khan - Encyclopedia.com
Ayub Khan was returned to office in 1965, defeating Fatimah Jinnah, sister of the founder of Pakistan.
Early in 1969, Ayub Khan announced that he would not seek reelection in 1970, but unrest continued and in March he resigned power to a martial-law government headed by Gen. Muhammad Yahya Khan.
Ayub Khan Ommaya is professor of clinical neurosurgery...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-AyubKhan.html   (900 words)

  
 BANGLAPEDIA: Khan, (Field Marshal) Mohammad Ayub   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ayub Khan was born at Abottabad in the Northwest Frontier Province in 1908.
Ayub Khan was appointed the Chief Martial Law Administrator by President Mirza on 8 October.
Ayub Khan's martial law regime was a form of representational dictatorship, and he introduced a new political system in 1959 as basic democracies.
banglapedia.org /HT/K_0160.HTM   (1506 words)

  
 Ayub Khan Summary
Ayub's rise to power was a product of the years of economic and political instability that had followed the death of the two great leaders of Pakistan in its formative phase, M. Jinnah and Liaquat Ali Khan.
Khan was born in the village of Rehana near Haripur Hazara to a Hindko speaking Pashtun family of the Tareen tribe, the first child of the second wife of Mir Dad Khan, who was a Risaldar Major in Hodson's Horse.
During Ayub Khan's rule the price of 1 kg sugar was increased by 1 rupee and the whole population took to streets.
www.bookrags.com /Ayub_Khan   (2278 words)

  
 Let’s combat communalism
Ayub Khan reveals his own outlook of political activist rather than intellectual observer by brushing aside the actual contents of these criticisms, so inconvenient to the case he is making.
Ayub Khan continues: “Elst's commitment to the Sangh Parivar can be gauged from the fact that he unabashedly defended it even as the fires of Gujarat were still raging last year.
Khan is welcome to improve upon the Prophet’s conduct and provide the first refutation to anything he dislikes in the criticisms cited in the core texts of Islam, or in the works of “colonial orientalists” like D.S. Margoliouth, or in the works of Ram Swarup and Sita Ram Goel.
koenraadelst.voiceofdharma.com /articles/fascism/PolSec03AyubKhan1.html   (4441 words)

  
 Election Laws
In March 1962, Gen Ayub Khan announced a constitution for the country and elections were held for the legislature.
Ayub Khan was the candidate for presidency from the platform of the Pakistan Muslim League (Convention), which was founded in December 1963.
Ayub Khan won the elections in both wings of the country.
www.hrcpelectoralwatch.org /his_persp.cfm   (2181 words)

  
 Ayub Khan-Din
Ayub Khan-Din was born in 1961 and grew up in Salford, Manchester.
Thus, through its plot development, the play addresses issues which are still strongly felt in our contemporary society such as arranged marriages, the status of women and gender difference, the conflict between Christian and Muslim beliefs and the challenges to both coming from the forces of secularisation.
Paradoxically, George Khan, the first not to follow his own orthodox principles, claims, in the words of cultural studies scholar Paul Gilroy, identity not 'as an ongoing process of self-making and social interaction', but as 'a thing to be possessed and displayed'.
www.contemporarywriters.com /authors/?p=auth02D2K371612627164   (1143 words)

  
 Field Marshal Ayub Khan Becomes President [1962-1969]
In March 1962, Ayub Khan suspended the Martial Law and proclaimed the Constitution of 1962.
The 1965 War was fought during Ayub's term and Ayub Khan represented Pakistan in the subsequent Tashkent Talks.
Ayub Khan moved the capital of Pakistan from Karachi to Islamabad in 1965, but could not complete his term due to public pressure.
www.storyofpakistan.com /articletext.asp?artid=A067   (150 words)

  
 Ayub  Khan   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ayub Khan joined Royal Military College in Sandhurst and got commissioned in the Indian army in 1928.
In 1951 Ayub Khan was promoted to a full General and Commander-in-Chief of the army.
The 1965 war was fought during Ayub's term and Ayub Khan represented Pakistan in the subsequent Tashkent talks.
dr.abdulqadeer.8m.net /ayub.htm   (232 words)

  
 The South Asian: From Ayub to Musharraf
Ayub Khan’s rule was seen as a golden period of Pakistan’s history.
Ayub Khan’s “dhol sepahis” (dear soldiers) never lost the war on Pakistan’s radio and TV and General Musharraf’s enlightened generals are doing very well, buying lands in Gwadar and elsewhere.
Ayub Khan kept rolling on empty because there was no one to apply the brakes.
www.thesouthasian.org /archives/2006/from_ayub_to_musharraf.html   (997 words)

  
 Untitled Document
Khan’s first move was to create the four-tier structure of ‘Basic Democracies’, bodies which would form the basis of a new political order.
The Constitution advocated a presidential form of government and Ayub Khan was sworn in as president once again, this time under the conditions of the new constitution.
Ayub Khan was nominated as the candidate for the Convention Muslim League and the combined opposition parties all agreed to Miss Fatima Jinnah as their presidential candidate.
www.mtholyoke.edu /~qzpaienj/worldpolitics/ayub.htm   (907 words)

  
 Muhammad Ayub Khan — FactMonster.com
In 1958, after a military coup, Ayub Khan became president; he was confirmed in office by a referendum (Feb., 1960).
Ayub Khan was returned to office in 1965, defeating Fatimah Jinnah, sister of the founder of Pakistan.
Early in 1969, Ayub Khan announced that he would not seek reelection in 1970, but unrest continued and in March he resigned power to a martial-law government headed by Gen. Muhammad
www.factmonster.com /id/A0805530   (303 words)

  
 Ayub Khan says Bhutto misled him into 1965 war : Asia World
Ayub writes in his diaries 'Friends Not Masters', being published this week, that he had been told that there was rebellion in Jammu and Kashmir and Pakistan could capture the disputed territory with the help of infiltrators.
Ayub faced flak at home and abroad for having removed Bhutto because of the latter's anti-US and pro-China stance and allegations that American aid to Pakistan was linked to his removal.
After Ayub Khan took over in a bloodless military coup, Bhutto joined the cabinet as its youngest member and was the commerce minister.
www.earthtimes.org /articles/show/57808.html   (551 words)

  
 AsiaSource: Asia Biography - a resource of the Asia Society
Ayub Khan, Mohammad (1907-1974), Pakistani military and political leader; president of Pakistan from 1958 to 1969.
Ayub Khan grew up in a village in the Hazara district of northwest Pakistan.
General (later Field Marshal) Ayub Khan's rule is best remembered for the inconclusive 1965 border war with India over Kashmir, the "Basic Democracy," and the "Great Decade." "Basic Democracy," was represented by the constitution of 1962, which instituted indirect elections in Pakistan and gave the president extraordinary powers.
www.asiasource.org /society/ayubkhan.cfm   (407 words)

  
 Ayub Khan - Voyager, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Muhammad Ayub Khan (May 14 1907 – April 19 1974) was a Field Marshal during the mid-1960s, and the political leader of Pakistan from 1958 to 1969.
Khan, advised by his Foreign Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, attempted to flush Kashmir with militants and Pakistani soldiers.
In addition, the settlement that was reached by Khan at Tashkent was seen as a loss for Pakistan.
voyager.in /Ayub_Khan   (903 words)

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