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Topic: Ayyubid dynasty


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  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Ayyubid dynasty
Ayyubid Dynasty, Muslim dynasty of Kurdish origins which ruled Egypt, Syria, and northern Iraq in the 12th and 13th centuries.
The Ayyubid Dynasty was founded by Saladin, who, with his uncle Shirkuh[?], conquered Egypt for the Zengid King Nur ad-Din of Damascus in 1169.
In 1250 Turanshah, the last Ayyubid Sultan of Egypt, was murdered and replaced by his Mamluk slave-general Aibek, who founded the Mamluk Dynasty[?].
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/ay/Ayyubid_dynasty   (291 words)

  
  Ayyubid dynasty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Ayyubid Dynasty was a Muslim dynasty of Kurdish origins which ruled Egypt, Syria, and Kurdistan Iraq in the 12th and 13th centuries.
The Ayyubid Dynasty was founded by Saladin (Salah ah-Din), who, with his uncle Shirkuh, conquered Egypt for the Zengid King Nur ad-Din of Damascus in 1169.
In 1250 Turanshah, the last Ayyubid Sultan of Egypt, was murdered and replaced by his Mamluk slave-general Aibek, who founded the Bahri dynasty.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ayyubids   (334 words)

  
 1174-93. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
The AYYUBID DYNASTY, the successors of Saladin, in Egypt and Syria.
The mamluks were the Turkish and Circassian military slaves who formed the mainstay of the late Ayyubid army.
The Mamluks organized themselves into military households in which young slaves, usually purchased from the lands north of the Caspian Sea and, later, from the Caucasus, were trained as soldiers, brought up as Muslims, and eventually set free.
www.bartleby.com /67/319.html   (1056 words)

  
 Station Information - Ayyubid dynasty
Ayyubid Dynasty, Muslim dynasty of Kurdish origins which ruled Egypt, Syria, and northern Iraq in the 12th and 13th centuries.
The Ayyubid Dynasty was founded by Saladin, who, with his uncle Shirkuh, conquered Egypt for the Zengid King Nur ad-Din of Damascus in 1169.
In 1250 Turanshah, the last Ayyubid Sultan of Egypt, was murdered and replaced by his Mamluk slave-general Aibek, who founded the Mamluk Dynasty.
www.stationinformation.com /encyclopedia/a/ay/ayyubid_dynasty.html   (274 words)

  
 Saladin — Salah al-Din al-Ayubbi
Salah al-Din al-Ayubbi founded the Ayyubid dynasty of Egypt and Syria.
Known as Saladin in the West, Salah al Din al Ayubi was born in 1138 in Tikrit.
The Ayyubid dynasty, founded by Salah al-Din ibn Ayyub, ruled Egypt and Syria from 1169 to 1250 CE.
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org /jsource/biography/Saladin.html   (408 words)

  
 Ayyubid Dynasty
Sunni Muslim dynasty of Kurdish origins, ruling from late 12th to the middle of the 13th century over Egypt and Syria together with large parts of Yemen, Hijaz and territories in northern Iraq.
The Ayyubids, largely involved in decades of warfare were allowed fairly little time to build their homelands.
Still, the Ayyubids are remembered for the citadel of Cairo and they had the citadel of Aleppo rebuilt, giving it its present shape.
i-cias.com /e.o/ayyubid_d.htm   (496 words)

  
 The Ayyubid City Fortification (of Cairo)
The Ayyubid city walls were built by Saladin between 1176 and 1183 AD with a vision of containing the former Fatimid city and its suburbs, the old city of ‘Al-Fustat’ and to reinforce and existing fortifications, hence forming one single solid city wall protecting the whole metropolis from Crusaders.
After the rule of Saladin, a further extensive fortification scheme was developed given that the Ayyubid dynasty was one that relied heavily on military skills and powers.
The archaeological discovery of the Ayyubid wall was one the most important of the past decades relating to the Islamic period in Egypt.
www.touregypt.net /featurestories/ayyubidfortress.htm   (1347 words)

  
 Ayyubid dynasty - Britannica Concise
Mamluk dynasty - (1250–1517) Rulers of Syria and Egypt.
Saladin - Kurdish sultan of Egypt, Syria, Yemen, and Palestine and founder of the Ayybid dynasty.
Ayyubid - Sunnite Muslim dynasty, founded by Saladin (al ad-Dn), that ruled over Egypt and what became upper Iraq, most of Syria, and Yemen in the late 12th and early 13th centuries.
concise.britannica.com /ebc/article-9356262   (473 words)

  
 ayatollah - In the Shiite branch of Islam, a high-ranking religious authority regarded by his followers as the most ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Almoravid dynasty -Berber dynasty that succeeded the Fatimid dynasty in the Maghrib.
The Fatimid dynasty proclaimed a new caliphate in 920; Abd al-Rahman III announced one in opposition to both the Abbasids and the Fatimids in 928.
The dynasty's rulers, descended from Timur and Genghis Khan, included unusually talented rulers over the course of seven generations, and the dynasty was further distinguished by its emperors' efforts to integrate Hindus and Muslims into a united Indian state.
www.gc.peachnet.edu /socsci/ehancock/BULLI/Islam-terms.htm   (3590 words)

  
 Fatimid dynasty - Britannica Concise
The last caliph died in 1171, and the dynasty was succeeded by the Sunnite Ayyubid dynasty.
Almoravid dynasty - (1056–1147) Berber confederation that succeeded the Fimid dynasty in the Maghrib.
Sulayhid - (1047–1138), Muslim dynasty nominally subject to the Fimid caliph in Egypt, responsible for restoring the Ism'liyyah (an extremist Islamic sect) in Yemen.
concise.britannica.com /ebc/article-9364252   (566 words)

  
 Al-Ahram Weekly | Culture | A new dynasty, a new art
By this date the threat to Ayyubid rule came less from further Crusader incursions than from the invading Mongol armies that had sacked Baghdad in 1258, before going on to do the same to Aleppo and Damascus, ending the Ayyubid dynasty in Syria.
In this history, written at the request of the king of Jerusalem, William, a native of Jerusalem and later Archbishop of Tyre, nevertheless describes his enemy Saladin as "a man of ardent spirit, valiant in warfare and generous in everything".
Ayyubid architecture is sober and rational, the decoration on Ayyubid bronzework clear and immediately accessible.
weekly.ahram.org.eg /2001/558/cu2.htm   (1019 words)

  
 Egypt - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Egypt   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
They were succeeded by the Abbasid dynasty in 750.
He was followed by the briefly successful rule of the Ikshidid dynasty (until 968), and then in 969 the Shiite Fatimids conquered Egypt.
During this period freed Turkish slaves known as Mamelukes formed the sultan's bodyguard and, after the death of the Ayyubid sultan Nagm-al-din, they seized power in 1250, forming a dynasty that was to rule Egypt and Syria for nearly 300 years.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Egypt   (7147 words)

  
 Ayyubid Dynasty --¬† Encyclop√¶dia Britannica
Sunnite Muslim dynasty, founded by Saladin (Salah ad-Din), that ruled over Egypt and what became upper Iraq, most of Syria, and Yemen in the late 12th and early 13th centuries.
Muslim dynasty that ruled Yemen and Hadramawt (1229–1454) after the Ayyubids of Egypt abandoned the southern provinces of the Arabian Peninsula.
Ayyubid objectives were probably part political, to find themselves a haven and destroy the Isma'ilites, and part economic, to control the India trade route.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9011523   (781 words)

  
 National Gallery of Art | Press Office
The founder of the dynasty, Mu‘awiyah ibn Abi Sufyan, was a distant cousin of the Prophet.
Thereafter a titular caliph of the Abbasid dynasty resided in Cairo until the Ottoman conquest in 1517.
In Egypt the dynasty was replaced by the rule of the Mamluks in 1250.
www.nga.gov /press/exh/212/dyn.shtm   (1612 words)

  
 Islamic Heraldry by David Appleton - Journal of the American Academy for Genealogical and Heraldic Sciences
Thy Ayyubid dynasty, beginning with Yusuf ibn Ayyub, better known to the world by his laqab, Salah al-Din (Saladin), may be roughly dated from 1171 A.D., the year he overthrew the Fatimid caliphate of Egypt.
The Mamluk dynasty, if it can be termed such, dates from 1250 A.D., when the Bahri Mamluks elected Shajar al-Durr, Turan Shah’s mother, as their Sultana, until 1517 A.D., when the last Mamluk Sultan, Tumanbay II, was killed at the hands of the victorious Ottoman armies.
The Mamluks were a military aristocracy with a limited membership, whose participants came directly from among the slaves imported from non-Muslim territories as the soldiers and bodyguards of the sultan or amirs, who themselves had begun their careers as slaves.
users.panola.com /AAGHS/manluk.html   (1946 words)

  
 Jordan - Touristic Sites - South of Amman
Wadi Mujib was the "Arnon Gorge" or "Arnon River" of the Bible (Numbers 21: 24; Judges 11: 18), a natural boundary which separated the Moabites in the south from the Amorites in the north.
Salah Eddin al-Ayyubi, the founder of the Ayyubid dynasty, began his career as a lieutenant in the army of Noor Eddin, the Sultan of Mosul.
The Ayyubid dynasty would rule much of these lands for the next eighty years.
www.kinghussein.gov.jo /tourism6b.html   (1270 words)

  
 The Islamic art collection at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, LACMA
New rulers, of varying ethnic backgrounds, established short-lived regional dynasties, in contrast to the preceding period, in which Arab leadership predominated and the Islamic world was united under the centralized authority of the caliph.
With the deterioration of Abbasid authority, autonomous dynasties soon established themselves in the western territories.
With the fall of this dynasty in 1031, Spain was divided into several minor principalities.
www.lacma.org /islamic_art/emp.htm   (840 words)

  
 Ayyubid dynasty: Encyclopedia topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
In 1171, Saladin deposed the last Fatimid (Fatimid: the fatimid or fatimid caliphate is the ismaili shiite dynasty that ruled north...
In 1250 Turanshah, the last Ayyubid Sultan of Egypt, was murdered and replaced by his Mamluk slave-general Aibek, who founded the Bahri dynasty (Bahri dynasty: the bahri dynasty or bahriyya sultante...
The Ayyubids lingered on in Syria for another ten years, when they fell to the Mongols (Mongols: A member of the nomadic peoples of Mongolia).
www.absoluteastronomy.com /reference/ayyubid_dynasty   (471 words)

  
 Muslim Heraldry   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
The Ayyubid dynasty, beginning with Yusuf ibn Ayyub, better known to the world by his lakab Salah al-Din (Saladin), may be roughly dated from 1171 A.D., & year he overthrew the Fatimid caliphate of Egypt.
The Mamluk dynasty, if it can be termed such, dates from 1250 A.D., when the Bahri Mamluks elected Shajar al-Durr, Turan Shah's mother, as their Sultana, until 1517 A.D., when the last Mamluk Sultan, Tumanbay II, was killed at the hands of the invading Ottoman armies.
It appears that under the Ayyubids and early Mamluks that amirs were specifically granted their blazons, while under the later circassians the amirs were allowed free choice.
www.tirbriste.org /dmir/Heraldry/1307.html   (1729 words)

  
 The Islamic World to 1600: The Fractured Caliphate and the Regional Dynasties (Egypt)
The Ayyubids were led by a Kurd, Salah al-Din, or Saladin, who became one of the most famous rulers in Islamic history, and whose father, Ayyub, lent his name to their dynasty.
Although the Ayyubid dynasty lasted until the Mamluk coup in 1250, more than 50 years after Saladin's death, it is he whose name is identified with the Ayyubid period.
After Shajarat's death in 1259 the Ayyubid dynasty, on a steady decline for ten years, finally fell to the Mamluks, a class of Turkish slave soldiers who had served under the Ayyubids.
www.ucalgary.ca /applied_history/tutor/islam/fractured/egypt.html   (1123 words)

  
 Kingdoms of North Africa - Ayyubids
Although originally ruling from Egypt, Saladdin spent the last years of his life fighting in Syria and Palestine and was buried in Damascus, next to the Omayyad (Umayyad) Mosque.
The Ayyubid family still suvives in Lebanon and retaines Saladin's sword.
Damascus ruled by an Ayyubid relative as a subsidiary state.
www.kessler-web.co.uk /History/KingListsAfrica/EgyptAyyubids.htm   (172 words)

  
 Ayubbid Period
The Ayyubid Dynasty began with the victory of Salah al Din over the Franks and the Fatimids in 1171.
This would become the norm throughout the Mamluk dynasties and often, the dome over the mausoleum would be the only dome of the madrasa complex.
With the death of Sultan Salih, the throne passed from the Ayyubids to the Mamluks ending the Ayyubid period.
www.class.uidaho.edu /arch499/nonwest/cairo/ayyubid_period.htm   (544 words)

  
 Ayyubid dynasty Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Iraq The Ayyubid Dynasty was founded by Saladin (Salah ah-Din), who, with his uncle Shirkuh, conquered Egypt for the Zengid King Nur ad-Din of Damascus in 1169.
A unified kingdom was founded circa 3200 BC by King Menes, and a series of dynasties ruled in Egypt for the next three millennia.
The last native dynasty, known as the Thirtieth Dynasty, fell to the Persians in 341 BC who dug the predecessor of the Suez canal and connected the Red Sea to the Mediterranean.
wainscott.new.york.en.ogarnij.info /en/Ayyubid+dynasty   (9617 words)

  
 The Rise of Islam - History - Yemen - Middle East: conversion islam, yemen history, ayyubid dynasty, abbasid rule, ...
Yemen was ruled by a series of Muslim caliphs, beginning with the Umayyad dynasty, which ruled from Damascus in the latter part of the 7th century; Umayyad rule was followed by the Abbasid caliphs in the early 8th century.
The founding of a local Yemeni dynasty in the 9th century effectively ended both Abbasid rule from Baghdad and the authority of the Arab caliphate.
The Rasulids, one of the major dynasties in the history of Yemen, broke from the Egyptian Ayyubid dynasty to rule independently.
www.countriesquest.com /middle_east/yemen/history/the_rise_of_islam.htm   (292 words)

  
 Egyptvoyager.com: Islamic Cairo History - Ayyubid Dynasty
The founder of the Ayyubid dynasty, Salah al-Din ibn Ayyub, spent much of his reign fighting the Crusaders, and his main additions to the city were thus military.
Salih Ayyub, the last Ayyubid ruler, died before this complex was finished.
His wife, Shaggarat al-Durr, who completed it for him, briefly became the only female ruler of Muslim Egypt before being beaten to death with wooden clogs for the murder of a rival claimant.
www.egyptvoyager.com /towns_cairo_history_islamic_ayububidis.htm   (169 words)

  
 Discover Jordan Portal - All about Jordan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Salah Eddin al-Ayyubi, the founder of the Ayyubid dynasty, began his career as a lieutenant in the army of Noor Eddin, the Sultan of Mosul.
The Ayyubid dynasty would rule much of these lands for the next eighty years.
Following the death of Salah Eddin in 1193, the Ayyubid dynasty divided.
www.discoverjordan.com /directory/kingdom/history.asp?sec=jor_salah   (333 words)

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