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Topic: BF2C Goshawk


  
  Goshawk - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
In spring, he has a spectacular roller-coaster display, and this is the best time to see this secretive forest bird.
The T-45 Goshawk is a training aircraft used by the United States Navy.
You can find it there under the keyword Goshawk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goshawk)The list of previous authors is available here: version history (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Goshawkandaction=history).
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Goshawk   (396 words)

  
 F11-C Goshawk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Curtiss F11-C Goshawk was a 1930s naval biplane that saw limited success but was part of a long line of "Hawk" airplanes made by Curtiss for the American military.
The F11C-3 (BF2C-1) was one of the first retractable landing gear fighter/bomber Navy aircraft, and while considered a failure in the pre-WWII American Navy (it had many problems), it saw heavy action in post war Asia.
In spite of its short service run many of the innovations developed for the Goshawk line found wide use in Navy aircraft for years to follow.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/F11-C_Goshawk   (169 words)

  
 [No title]
The BF2C was an outgrowth of the earlier fixed-gear BFC produced for the U.S. Navy, incorporating the manually operated retractable landing gear found on the Grumman FF.
Despite its advanced features, including the solid Wright Cyclone R-1820 engine of 700 hp, the BF2C was plagued with technical problems that led it to be withdrawn from service less than a year after its introduction.
One of the major problems that had plagued the BF2C was vibration from the Cyclone engine.
www.oldbeacon.com /gallery/markham/markham-4.htm   (413 words)

  
 Classic Airframes 1/48 Curtiss Hawks
The last of the series was the "Goshawk," which saw service in the U.S. Navy as the F-11C-2 and BFC-2, and in South America, China and Thailand as the Hawk II export fighter.
The Goshawk was a retrograde step in the development of the series, inasmuch as the design reverted to wooden wings and tail after Curtiss had moved to metal construction with the Sparrowhawk.
After painting the wings of the Navy Goshawks, I painted their tail surfaces - white in the case of the BFC-2 and red for the F-11C-2, using Gunze-Sanyo gloss paints for this.
modelingmadness.com /reviews/preww2/cleaverhawks.htm   (3070 words)

  
 Classic Airframes BF2C-2 & F11C-2 Hawks Preview   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
The last of the series was the "Goshawk," which saw service in the U.S. Navy as the F-11C-2 and BFC-2, and in South America, China and Thailand as the Hawk II export fighter; the major difference between the types was the lack of carrier gear in the export fighter, different cowlings and exhaust systems.
The "Goshawk" was a retrograde step in the development of the series, inasmuch as the design reverted to wooden wings and tail, and fabric-covered surfaces, after Curtiss had moved to metal construction with the P-6 and the Sparrowhawk.
28 F-11C-2 Goshawks were delivered to the Navy, commencing in March 1933, and fleet service was with the "High Hats," at the time VF-1B, aboard the U.S.S. "Saratoga." At first, the unit flew a mixed group of Boeing F4B-3s and Curtiss F-11C-2s.
m2reviews.cnsi.net /reviews/preww2/cleaverhawkspreview.htm   (1000 words)

  
 GPN-2000-001239 - Curtiss BF2C-1 Goshawk
On the right is the Curtiss BF2C-1 Goshawk.
Standing at the hangar door is NACA chief test pilot Melvin Gough.
The Goshawk, Curtis model 67A, proved to be a disappointment to the Navy, mainly due to problems with its retractable landing gear and its metal-frame wings.
grin.hq.nasa.gov /ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001239.html   (46 words)

  
 Fleither » BF2C Goshawk   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
I Spirit of St. BFC 2 Goshawk Curtiss BF2C Hawk F9C 2 Sparrowhawk Grumman 1 Grumman F3F 2 Grumman 2 Flying Barrel Curtiss SOC.
I Spirit of St. Curtiss BFC 2 Goshawk Curtiss 1 Hawk F9C 2 Sparrowhawk F3F 1 Grumman F3F 2 F3F 2 Flying Barrel Curtiss 1 Seagull.
The Curtiss BF2C was an advancement of the F11C 1 Goshawk developed for USN in 1932.
www.fleither.com /category/bf2c-goshawk   (819 words)

  
 Curtiss BF2C-1 Goshawk 1/72 Scale
At the time, it was the Chinese Air Force's primary fighter.
The Hawk III was the export version of the Curtiss BF2C-1 Goshawk, which was the last biplane carrier fighter built for the U.S. Navy.
It was used only briefly, however, by the U.S. because its all-metal wings would vibrate in harmony with its engine.
www.jdburgessonline.com /planes/goshawk.html   (250 words)

  
 Key Publishing Ltd Aviation Forums - Crazymainer US Navy Quiz #7   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
From what I've read it's a Curtiss BF2C-1 or F11C Goshawk.
It originally came out with fixed undercarriage, but the US Navy were so impressed with Grumman's layout that Curtiss installed it inot the Goshawk.
However the Goshawk suffered from structual weaknesses and was retired in 1934 (2 year life span).
forum.keypublishing.co.uk /printthread.php?t=33143   (829 words)

  
 China’s Air Forces in the Struggle Against Japan
A 1/72-scale Hawk III has just been released by the Czech MPM firm, complete with Chinese markings.
Hasegawa’s 1/32-scale U.S. Navy BF2C-1 Goshawk could, with different markings be a Chinese Hawk III.
If you want a 1/48-scale Hawk, you could try to convert Lindberg’s elderly but nice BFC-2 Goshawk.
worldatwar.net /chandelle/v2/v2n2/china30s.html   (2950 words)

  
 [No title]
Use the BF2C pics AND the Hawk III pics for details as most were shared.
Included are three photos of a Hawk III (basically identical to the BF2C except for the wing and engine) being assembled.
While these are small and don't show off the interior, they give insight to many details.
www.wwi-models.org /mail-archive/archive.1997/753   (3295 words)

  
 Curtiss F11C Goshawk   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
The F11C was basically a developed F6C, using the wings of the XP-23.
The F11C-3 had a retractable undercarriage, and was later renamed BF2C.
Export included, the production of the F11C was over 130.
www.csd.uwo.ca /~pettypi/elevon/gustin_military/db/us/F11CGOSH.html   (54 words)

  
 Hasegawa 1/32 BF2C-1 Preview
Let me quote from the instruction sheet for this.
"The Curtiss BF2C-1 was an advancement of the earlier F11C-1 Goshawk developed for the USN in 1932.
It was strengthened for dive bombing and a retractable landing gear was added.
modelingmadness.com /scotts/preww2/hbf2cpreview.htm   (559 words)

  
 Flight Sim Watch - Goshawk Fs2004
1 Goshawk painted as: 1.BF2C-1 "Pilot unknown, Leader of VB-5B, USS RANGER (CV-5), March 1935".
Name: FS2002 PRO Boeing T 45 Goshawk Panel.
Export version of the US Navy F11C-2 Goshawk.
www.flightsimwatch.com /goshawk-fs2004.php   (113 words)

  
 Curtis Goshawk   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
For more details and the current pricing of this plan set,
The Goshawk was capable of carrying four 112 lb bombs under the wings or a bomb of up to 500 lb beneath the fuselage on a crutch which swings down to prevent the bomb hitting the propeller when released.
A 50 gallon fuel tank could also be carried under the fuselage.
www.agelesswings.com /GOSHAWK.HTM   (162 words)

  
 Squadron/Signal Publications Curtiss Navy Hawks In Action - ssp1156
Black and White photographs with captions (brief description of picture)
Read about: F6C Hawk Series, F6C-3, F6C-6, XF6C-6, F6C-4, F6C-4 Variants, F7C Seahawk, F7C-1, F9C Sparrowhawk, F9C-2, F11C Goshawk, BF2C-1, plus others
Includes some color illustrations of the different planes
www.hobbylinc.com /htm/ssp/ssp1156.htm   (106 words)

  
 [No title]
If it is, I have to agree with Shane.
Does the > >term Goshawk ring a bell?
Sorry, Matt, the Goshawk was 2 generation prior to it, if my info is correct.
www.wwi-models.org /1/mail-archive/archive.1997/756   (4502 words)

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