Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Vowel backness


Related Topics

  
  Vowel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Backness refers to the tongue position during the articulation of a vowel relative to the back of the mouth.
Furthermore, in English some vowel sounds are represented by combinations of vowel letters, such as the ea in beat or by a vowel letter and an approximant letter, as the ow in how, or the er in her.
Vowels are especially important to the structures of words in languages that have very few consonants (like Polynesian languages such as Maori and Hawaiian), and in languages whose inventory of vowels is larger than its inventory of consonants (like Sedang, a relative of Vietnamese, which contrasts 55 different vowel qualities).
www.abcworld.net /Vowel.html   (2870 words)

  
  Vowel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Backness refers to the horizontal tongue position during the articulation of a vowel relative to the back of the mouth.
Vowels are especially important to the structures of words in languages that have very few consonants (like Polynesian languages such as Maori and Hawaiian), and in languages whose inventory of vowels is larger than its inventory of consonants.
Furthermore, in English some vowel sounds are represented by combinations of vowel letters, such as the ea in beat or by a vowel letter and an approximant letter, as the ow in how, or the er in her.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Vowel   (3285 words)

  
 Vowel article - Vowel phonetics sound language vocal tract consonants Latin syllable - What-Means.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
In phonetics, a vowel is a sound in spoken language that is characterized by an open configuration of the vocal tract, in contrast to consonants, which are characterized by a constriction or closure at one or more points along the vocal tract.
Vowels usually form the peak or nucleus of a syllable, whereas consonants form the onset and coda.
Backness refers to the tongue position during the articulation of a vowel relative to the back and front of the mouth.
www.what-means.com /encyclopedia/Vowel   (1661 words)

  
 Kensonelezh vogalennek - Wikipedia
Non-initially, the neutral vowels are transparent to and unaffected by vowel harmony.
a neutral vowel acts like a front vowel, but does not control the frontness or backness of the word: if there are back vowels in non-initial syllables, the word acts like it began with back vowels, even if they come from derivational endings, e.g.
Vowel harmony is a grammaticalized feature of phonotactics, thus it may not work as expected from pure phonology, as evidenced by tuotteeseensa (not *tuotteeseensä).
br.wikipedia.org /wiki/Kensonnelezh_vogalennek   (704 words)

  
 Vowel - the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Sometimes vowels are defined by whether they form the nucleus of a syllable, and by that criterion these sounds are vowels, but usually sounds that can form the nucleus of a syllable are called sonorants.
Backness refers to the tongue position during the articulation of a vowel relative to the back of the mouth.
Tenseness is the amount of energy expended in producing the vowel, so that tense vowels have higher formants and generally greater tongue involvement in the production of the sound that their lax counterparts.
www.encyclopedia-of-knowledge.com /?t=Vowel   (1694 words)

  
 Vowel backness - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
In phonetics, vowel backness is the position of the tongue relative to the back of the mouth in a vowel sound.
The second formant of a vowel (F2) usually corresponds to vowel backness, with a lower F2 corresponding to a back vowel and a higher F2 corresponding to a front vowel.
The International Phonetic Alphabet identifies 5 different degrees of vowel backness, although no known language distinguishes all 5:
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Vowel_backness   (95 words)

  
 Vowel -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Vowels usually form the peak or nucleus of a (A unit of spoken language larger than a phoneme) syllable, whereas consonants form the onset and coda.
The name "vowel" is often used for the symbols used for representing vowel sounds in a language's (A method of representing the sounds of a language by written or printed symbols) writing system, particularly if the language uses an (A character set that includes letters and is used to write a language) alphabet.
Furthermore, in English some vowel sounds are represented by combinations of vowel letters, such as the ea in beat or by a vowel letter and an (Click link for more info and facts about approximant) approximant letter, as the ow in how, or the er in her.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/v/vo/vowel.htm   (2788 words)

  
 Upto11.net - Wikipedia Article for Vowel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
However, some languages allow sounds that wouldn't normally be classified as vowels to form the nucleus of a syllable, such as the sound of m in the English word prism, or the sound of r in the Czech word vrba (meaning "willow").
In front vowels, such as i, the tongue is positioned forward in the mouth, whereas in back vowels, such as u, the tongue is positioned towards the back of the mouth.
Vowels are especially important to the structures of words in languages that have very few consonants (like Polynesian languages such as Maori and Hawaiian), and in languages whose inventory of vowels is larger than its inventory of consonants (like Sedang, a relative of Vietnamese, which contrasts 55 different vowel qualities).
www.upto11.net /generic_wiki.php?q=vowel   (1878 words)

  
 Vowel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Vowel heightHeight refers to the position of the tongue relative to the roof of the mouth.
Vowel backnessBackness refers to the tongue position during the articulation of a vowel relative to the back of the mouth.
Vowels are especially important to the structures of words in languages that have very few consonants (like Polynesian languages such as Maori languageMaori and Hawaiian languageHawaiian), and in languages whose inventory of vowels is larger than its inventory of consonants (like Sedang languageSedang, a relative of Vietnamese languageVietnamese/, which contrasts 55 different vowel qualities).
www.infothis.com /find/Vowel   (2062 words)

  
 Vowel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
English has all three types: the vowel sound in hit is a monophthong [ɪ], the vowel sound in boy is in most dialects a diphthong [ɔɪ], and the vowels sounds of flower (BrE [aʊə] AmE [aʊɚ]) [form a triphthong, although the particular qualities vary by dialect.
For example, the vowel sounds in a two-syllable pronunciation of the word flower (BrE [flaʊə] AmE [flaʊɚ]) phonetically form a triphthong, but are phonologically a sequence of a diphthong (represented by the letters ) and a monophthong (represented by the letters ).
Vowels are especially important to the structures of words in languages that have very few consonants (like Pacific languages such as Maori and Hawaiian) and in languages whose inventory of vowels is larger than its inventory of consonants (like Sedang, a relative of Vietnamese, which contrasts 55 different vowel qualities).
www.askfactmaster.com /Vowel   (1705 words)

  
 Vowel
In high vowels, such as [i][ and ]u[], the tongue is positioned high in the mouth, whereas in low vowels, such as a, the tongue is positioned low in the mouth.
At the other end of the spectrum, languages with more than 12 vowels are relatively uncommon, although some widely-spoken languages have large vowel inventories, particularly Germanic languages.
For example, English has 14-16 vowels (including diphthongs), depending on dialect, and Swedish has the most distinct vowel qualities in the height-backness-roundedness spectrum, with 17 different monophthongs.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/vowel   (1675 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
In front vowels, such as, the tongue is positioned forward in the mouth, whereas in back vowels, such as, the tongue is positioned towards the back of the mouth.
However, some languages treat roundedness and backness separately, such as French and German (with front rounded vowels), most Uralic languages (has a rounding contrast for /o/ and front vowels), Turkic languages (with an unrounded /u/), Vietnamese (with back unrounded vowels), and Korean (with a contrast in both front and back vowels).
English has all three types: the vowel sound in hit is a monophthong, the vowel sound in boy is in most dialects a diphthong, and the vowel sounds of way, flower (BrE AmE) form a triphthong (dissylabic in the latter cases), although the particular qualities vary by dialect.
www.everybase.com /Vowel   (3241 words)

  
 Vowel - Gurupedia
Some languages allow sounds that wouldn't normally be classified as vowels to form the nucleus of a syllable, such as the sound of m in the
Arabic and Latin have a two-way contrast between short and long vowels.
The name "vowel" is often used for the symbols used for representing vowel sounds in a language's writing system, particularly if the language uses an
www.gurupedia.com /v/vo/vowel.htm   (1599 words)

  
 Linguist List - Browse Dissertation Abstracts
Writing and Revising: Didactic and methodological implications of keystroke logging
Phonetic Grounding and Phonology: Vowel backness harmony and vowel height harmony
Negotiating Solidarity: A social-linguistic approach to job interviews
www.linguistlist.org /pubs/diss/browse-diss-by-letterL.html   (662 words)

  
 Articles - Vowel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Height refers to either the position of the tongue relative to the roof of the mouth or the aperture of the jaw.
The Japanese /u/, for example, is not rounded like English /u/, where the lips are pursed, but neither are the lips spread to the sides as they are for unrounded vowels.
(See Vowel roundedness for illustrations.) Swedish is one of the few languages where this feature is contrastive, have both pursed-lip and compressed-lip high front vowels.
gaple.com /articles/Vowel?mySession=eef4c593be17ffdcd63d5416c1c0bf0e   (2921 words)

  
 Vowel backness - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In phonetics, vowel backness is the position of the tongue relative to the back of the mouth in a vowel sound.
The second formant of a vowel (F2) usually corresponds to vowel backness, with a lower F2 corresponding to a back vowel and a higher F2 corresponding to a front vowel.
This page was last modified 19:41, 1 August 2005.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Vowel_backness   (95 words)

  
 Vowel Details, Meaning Vowel Article and Explanation Guide
Vowel Details, Meaning Vowel Article and Explanation Guide
For example, the vowel sounds in a two-syllable pronunciation of the word flower (BrE [flaʊə] AmE [flaʊɚ]) phonetically form a triphthong, but are phonologically a sequence of a diphthong (represented by the letters
Page Contains Information, Facts Details or Explanation Guide About Vowel
www.e-paranoids.com /v/vo/vowel.html   (1669 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.