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Topic: Bathyscaphe Trieste


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In the News (Wed 19 Jun 19)

  
  Bathyscaphe Trieste - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Trieste was a deep-diving research bathyscaphe ("deep boat") with a crew of two.
Transported to a new base at San Diego, she was extensively modified and then used in a series of deep-submergence tests in the Pacific Ocean during the next few years, including a dive to the Mariana Trench, the deepest known part of the ocean, in January 1960.
Trieste is a permanent exhibit at the Navy Museum in Washington, DC.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Bathyscaphe_Trieste   (525 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Bathyscaph   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
A bathyscape or bathyscaphe is a self-propelled deep-sea diving submersible, consisting of a crew cabin similar to a bathysphere suspended below a float filled with a buoyant liquid such as gasoline.
The Bathyscaphe Trieste Close-up of pressure sphere Trieste emblem Trieste was a deep-diving research bathyscaphe (deep boat) with a crew of two.
A bathyscape or bathyscaphe is a self-propelled deep-sea diving submersible, consisting of a crew cabin similar to a bathysphere suspended below a float filled with a buoyant liquid such as petrol.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Bathyscaph   (702 words)

  
  Bathyscaphe Trieste
Trieste was a deep-diving research bathyscaphe[?] ("deep boat") with a crew of two.
Transported to a new base at San Diego, she was extensively modified and then used in a series of deep-submergence tests in the Pacific Ocean during the next few years, including a dive to the deepest known part of the ocean in January 1960.
Trieste is a permanent exhibit at the Navy Museum in Washington, DC.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/us/USS_Trieste.html   (318 words)

  
  Bathyscaphe Trieste - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Trieste was a deep-diving research bathyscaphe ("deep boat") with a crew of two people, which reached a record-breaking depth of about 10,900 m, in the deepest part of the oceans, the Challenger Deep, in 1960.
The crew pressure sphere was 6.5 ft (2.16 m), attached to the underside of the floats and acccessed from the deck of the vessel by a vertical tunnel which penetrated the float and ran down to the sphere hatch.
The bathyscaphe was then retired and dismantled, and her pressure sphere was incorporated into the Trieste II, which also conducted some dives to the USS Thresher site in 1964.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Bathyscaphe_Trieste   (1107 words)

  
 Bathyscaphe Trieste Information
Trieste was a deep-diving research bathyscaphe ("deep boat") with a crew of two people.
Transported to the Naval Electronics Laboratory's facility in San Diego, it was extensively modified and then used in a series of deep-submergence tests in the Pacific Ocean during the next few years, including a dive to the Mariana Trench, the deepest known part of the ocean, in January 1960.
Trieste departed San Diego on October 5, 1959 on the way to Guam by the freighter Santa Maria to participate in Project Nekton — a series of very deep dives in the Mariana Trench.
www.bookrags.com /Bathyscaphe_Trieste   (561 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Jacques Piccard
Trieste A bathyscape or bathyscaphe is a self-propelled deep-sea diving submersible, consisting of a crew cabin similar to a bathysphere suspended below a float filled with a buoyant liquid such as petrol.
The bathyscaphe Trieste Close-up of pressure sphere Trieste emblem Trieste was a deep-diving research bathyscaphe (deep boat) with a crew of two people.
The Trieste, designed by Swiss scientist Auguste Piccard, was a bathyscaphe, or "deep boat." Before bathyscaphes, the deepest-diving vessels were bathyspheres -- steel spheres lowered and raised by a cable attached to a mother ship overhead.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Jacques-Piccard   (802 words)

  
 Bathyscaphe - Search View - MSN Encarta
The first such vessel, invented in 1947 by the Swiss physicist Auguste Piccard, explored the ocean bottom at a depth, in 1954, as great as 4000 m (13,125 ft) and operated under water pressure of 0.42 metric ton/sq cm.
The bathyscaphe Trieste, built in 1953, set a world record on January 23, 1960, when it descended 10,915 m (about 35,810 ft) to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, deepest known point in the oceans, 338 km (about 210 mi) southwest of Guam.
The Trieste was also used in the search for the hull of the nuclear submarine USS Thresher, which had plunged 2560 m (8400 ft) to the ocean floor 354 km (220 mi) east of Boston in April 1963.
encarta.msn.com /text_761573707__1/Bathyscaphe.html   (315 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > USS Trieste
Transported to a new base at San Diego, she was extensively modified and then used in a series of deep-submergence tests in the Pacific Ocean during the next few years, including a dive to the deepest known part of the ocean in January 1960.
In late 1959 Trieste had been fitted with a stronger pressure sphere and was transported to Guam by the freighter Santa Maria to participate in Project Nekton - a series of very deep dives in the Mariana Trench.
Trieste is a permanent exhibit at the Navy Museum in Washington, DC.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/us/USS_Trieste   (343 words)

  
 Bathyscaphe - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
A bathyscape, bathyscaphe, or bathyscaph is a self-propelled deep-sea diving submersible, consisting of a crew cabin similar to a bathysphere suspended below a float.
In 1960 Trieste set a world record by diving to a depth of 35,810 feet (10 915 metres) at the bottom of the Challenger Deep, the deepest point in the Mariana Trench and believed to be the deepest point in the world's oceans.
Bathyscaphes are a central plot element in the "De Ijzeren Schelvis" (1955) episode of Willy Vandersteens Spike and Suzy comic series.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Bathyscaphe   (359 words)

  
 Bathyscaphe Trieste II - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Trieste II (DSV-1) was the successor to Trieste —the United States Navy's first bathyscape purchased from its Swiss designers.
Between September 1965 and May 1966, TRIESTE II again underwent extensive modification and conversion at Mare Island Naval Shipyard but there is no clear record that she was ever operated in that new configuration, ie, the addition of skeds or outriggers on both sides of the sphere.
The Trieste class DSV were replaced by the Alvin class DSV, as exemplified by the famous Alvin (DSV-2).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Bathyscaphe_Trieste_II   (460 words)

  
 Bathyscaphe Trieste - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Trieste was a deep-diving research bathyscaphe ("deep boat") with a crew of two people.
Transported to the Naval Electronics Laboratory's facility in San Diego, it was extensively modified and then used in a series of deep-submergence tests in the Pacific Ocean during the next few years, including a dive to the Mariana Trench, the deepest known part of the ocean, in January 1960.
Trieste is now a permanent exhibit at the U.S. Navy Museum, Washington Navy Yard in Washington, DC.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Bathyscaphe_Trieste   (625 words)

  
 Bathyscaphe Summary
A bathyscape, bathyscaphe, or bathyscaph is a self-propelled deep-sea diving submersible, consisting of a crew cabin similar to a bathysphere suspended below a float.
In 1960 Trieste set a world record by diving to a depth of 35,810 feet (10 915 metres) at the bottom of the Challenger Deep, the deepest point in the Mariana Trench and believed to be the deepest point in the world's oceans.
Bathyscaphes are a central plot element in the "De Ijzeren Schelvis" (1955) episode of Willy Vandersteens Spike and Suzy comic series.
www.bookrags.com /Bathyscaphe   (826 words)

  
 News | Gainesville.com | The Gainesville Sun | Gainesville, Fla.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
A bathyscape, bathyscaphe, or bathyscaph is a free-diving self-propelled deep-sea diving submersible, consisting of a crew cabin similar to a bathysphere suspended below a float (rather than from a surface cable, as in the classic bathysphere design).
To descend, a bathyscaphe floods air tanks, but unlike a submarine the water in the flooded tanks cannot be displaced with compressed air to ascend, because water pressures are typically too great.
In 1960 Trieste, carrying Piccard's son and a U.S. Naval officer, set a world record by diving to a depth of 35,810 feet (10 915 metres) at the bottom of the Challenger Deep, the deepest point in the Mariana Trench and believed to be the deepest point in the world's oceans.
www.gainesville.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=bathyscaphe   (379 words)

  
 Trieste
Trieste was granted the status of a colony under Julius Caesar.
The University of Trieste (''Università degli Studi di Trieste'') is a medium-sized university in Trieste in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of Italy.
thumbrightGulf of Trieste and Slovene littoral The Gulf of Trieste (Italian: Golfo di Trieste, Slovene: Tržaški zaliv, German: Golf von Triest) is a shallow bay of the Adriatic Sea, in the extreme northern part of the Mediterranean Sea.
www.frozenup.com /pages9/91/trieste.html   (957 words)

  
 Trieste
The deep-diving research bathyscaphe Trieste was first launched in 1953 near Naples, Italy, by the Swiss scientist who designed her, Auguste Piccard.
On October 2, 1959, the Trieste was loaded onto the freighter Santa Maria for transport to the Mariana Islands for a series of deep-submergence operations in the Pacific Ocean.
On January 23, 1960 —; the day of the Trieste's historic dive to the bottom of the Mariana Trench —; the waves were 5 to 6 feet high in the ocean when Jacques Piccard (Auguste's son), and Navy Lt. Donald Walsh boarded Trieste from a rubber raft.
www.ocean.udel.edu /extreme2003/geology/trieste.html   (333 words)

  
 Submarine Photo Index
U.S. Navy Bathyscaphe Trieste 1, is hoisted out of the water in a tropical port, circa 1958-59, soon after her purchase by the Navy.
Trieste was being prepared for transportation to the Marianas Islands for a three-month series of deep-submergence operations.
U.S. Navy Bathyscaphe Trieste 1 in Boston enroute to the Thresher (SSN-593).
www.navsource.org /archives/08/08554.htm   (965 words)

  
 Bathyscaphe Trieste   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Trieste was a Swiss designed deep-diving research bathyscaphe ("deep boat") with a crew of two people, which reached a record-breaking depth of about 10,900 m, in the deepest part of the oceans, the Challenger Deep, in 1960.
This configuration (dubbed a "bathyscaphe" by Piccard), allowed for a free dive, rather than the previous bathysphere designs in which a sphere was lowered to depth and raised from a ship, via cable.
The bathyscaphe was then retired and dismantled, and her pressure sphere was incorporated into the Trieste II, which also conducted some dives to the USS Thresher site in 1964.
bathyscaphe-trieste.zdnet.co.za /zdnet/Bathyscaphe_Trieste   (1403 words)

  
 BATHYSCAPHE,
The first such vessel, invented in 1947 by the Swiss physicist Auguste Piccard, explored the ocean bottom at a depth, in 1954, as great as 4000 m (13,125 ft) and operated under water pressure of 0.42 metric ton/sq cm.
The bathyscaphe Trieste, built in 1953, set a world record on Jan. 23, 1960, when it descended 10,916 m (about 35,814 ft) to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, deepest known point in the oceans, 402 km (250 mi) southwest of Guam.
The Trieste was also used in the unsuccessful search for the hull of the nuclear submarine USS Thresher, which had plunged 2560 m (8400 ft) to the ocean floor 354 km (220 mi) off the coast of New England in April 1963.
www.history.com /encyclopedia.do?articleId=202405   (273 words)

  
 HBOI | Marine Operations | Division History
A major improvement on the bathysphere was the untethered bathyscaphe.
TRIESTE, designed by Swiss explorer Auguste Piccard, was purchased by the US Navy in 1958.
On January 23, 1960, Piccard's son Jacques and Navy Lieutenant Don Walsh descended 35,802 feet to the Challenger Deep (in the Marianas Trench near Guam).
www.hboi.edu /marineops/history.html   (1062 words)

  
 USN Ships--TRIESTE (1958-1963) in 1959-60
In October 1959, after being fitted with a stronger pressure sphere, Trieste was transported to the mid-Pacific to participate in Project "Nekton", in which she conducted a series of very deep dives in the Marianas Trench.
Jacques Piccard (right), co-designer of the bathyscaphe, and Ernest Virgil loading iron shot ballast into Trieste, prior to her record 18,600 foot descent in in the Marianas Trench, off Guam.
USS Wandank (ATA-204) is in the distance, apparently towing the bathyscaphe.
www.history.navy.mil /photos/sh-usn/usnsh-t/trste-b.htm   (411 words)

  
 USN Ships--TRIESTE (1958-1963) in 1958-59
Trieste, a deep-diving research bathyscaphe, was launched in 1953 near Naples, Italy, by the Swiss scientist Auguste Piccard.
Trieste was taken out of service soon after completing that mission and is now on exhibit at the Navy Museum, at the Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC.
This page features views of Trieste in about 1958-59, when she was first obtained by the U.S. Navy, and provides links to other images of her.
www.history.navy.mil /photos/sh-usn/usnsh-t/trste.htm   (323 words)

  
 Trieste, Italia (Italy)
Trieste is located in Northeastern Italy just South of the Alps, between Venice and the Istrian Peninsula, at the north end of the Adriatic Sea.
Trieste is a city which you must visit at least once in your lifetime.
Vienna at the head of the Gulf of Trieste, an arm of the Gulf of Venice.
italian-realestate.com /trieste.htm   (722 words)

  
 Rolex Deep Sea Special
In effect, the Trieste landed in a cloud of Bab-O. Clearly visible when the dust settled was a white flatfish about one foot long.
The Trieste stayed on the bottom for 30 minutes, but Piccard and Walsh could use its powerful lights for only short periods because the heat they generate made the water around them boil violently.
The brave divers were housed in a sphere attached to the bottom of the bathyscaphe's long buoyant tank.
bjsonline.com /watches/articles/0022_3.shtml   (782 words)

  
 Trieste - QuickSeek Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Trieste (Latin Tergeste, Italian Trieste, German and Friulian Triest, Slovenian and Croatian Trst) is a city and port in northeastern Italy right on the border to Slovenia.
Trieste flourished as part of Austria-Hungary during the period 1857 - 1918 when it was Central Europe's prosperous mediterranean sea port and its capital of literature and music.
Together with Trento, Trieste was the main seat of the irredendist movement, who aimed to the annexion to Italy of all the lands historically inhabited by culturally Italian people.
0.bypass-filter.com /index.php?q=aHR0cDovL3RyaWVzdGUucXVpY2tzZWVrLmNvbS8=   (1259 words)

  
 OUTERINNER.com | From Outer-Space to Inner-Space and Everything in Between   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Photo above: A Bathyscaphe Trieste is hoisted out of the water in a tropical port, circa 1958-59, soon after her purchase by the Navy.
Trieste departed San Diego on October 5, 1959 on the way to Guam by the freighter Santa Maria to participate in Project Nekton - a series of very deep dives in the Mariana Trench.
In appearance at the time of Project Nekton, Trieste was over 50 feet (15 m) long, but the great extent of this was a series of floats filled with 22,500 US gallons (85 m3) of gasoline to provide buoyancy, and air tanks at either end of the vessel.
www.freewebtown.com /smalltech/a0007.html   (678 words)

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