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Topic: Battle of Khe Sanh


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  Khe Sanh (song) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Khe Sanh" is a Australian pub rock song, released by the band Cold Chisel in 1978, and named after the Battle of Khe Sanh (1968), during the Vietnam War.
"Khe Sanh" is one of the most popular songs ever recorded by an Australian act and one generally seen as a resonant symbol of Australian culture.
"Khe Sanh", sung by the band's lead singer, Jimmy Barnes, was released as a 45 rpm single in May 1978.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Khe_Sanh_(song)   (426 words)

  
 Battle of Khe Sanh - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
After heavy casualties on both sides the PAVN claimed the battle to be a diversionary tactic and abandoned the campaign in the aftermath of the Tet Offensive.
The origin of the Khe Sanh Combat Base was an airstrip constructed in September 1962 outside the town of Khe Sanh, about 7 miles from the Laotian border.
Khe Sanh itself was abandoned on June 23, 1968 since it no longer had any military value.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Battle_of_Khe_Sanh   (1358 words)

  
 THE BATTLE OF KHE SANH, 1968
Khe Sanh was reinforced gradually by the U.S. military so as to not scare the enemy away.
By computing the length of the column of soldiers from sensor readouts, the commander at Khe Sanh became convinced that a PAVN regiment was attempting to close on the base.
Even with the claim of victory by the U.S. at Khe Sanh and during the Tet 1968 fighting in general, the psychological victory of the Vietnamese Communists during this period led to the beginning of the end for the United States in Vietnam.
www.library.vanderbilt.edu /central/brush/BattleKheSanh1968.htm   (10503 words)

  
 Airlift to KHE SANH
Khe Sanh had been familiar to airlifters in Vietnam for years, as evidenced by the many visits to the remote outpost by C-123s in the early 1960s.
Khe Sanh was only a few miles from the DMZ and equally close to Communist artillery positions in the mountains of Laos, which lay just to the west.
Khe Sanh was not the first Allied base in Vietnam to be surrounded and have to depend on airlift for resupply until the defenders were relieved, but it was the largest.
www.spectrumwd.com /c130/articles/khesanh.htm   (2419 words)

  
 Battlefield:Vietnam | History
Khe Sanh was one of the most remote outposts in Vietnam, but by January 1968, even President Lyndon Johnson had taken a personal interest in the base.
With Khe Sanh facing a full-scale siege by the North Vietnamese Army, the question was being asked: Should the base be held, or should it be quietly abandoned?
On the morning of January 21, 1968, NVA forces launched the awaited attack, and the siege of Khe Sanh had begun.
www.pbs.org /battlefieldvietnam/khe   (161 words)

  
 Strategic Crossroads at Khe Sanh
Khe Sanh was a deadly pas de deux in which General William C. Westmoreland called the tune and General Vo Nguyen Giap paid the piper.
For Westmoreland, Khe Sanh evolved from a reconnaissance platform to a potential invasion launch point, to a strongpoint and, finally, to a killing ground.
When Defense Secretary Robert McNamara proposed erecting a DMZ barrier in 1966, Khe Sanh became part of it, as the westernmost point in what Westmoreland called "the strong point obstacle system." Khe Sanh was designated as one of the Marine strongpoints south of the DMZ.
www.historynet.com /vn/blkhe_sanh   (1016 words)

  
 THE UNEXPLOITED VULNERABILITY OF THE MARINES AT KHE SANH   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The Communists, on the other hand, claimed that Khe Sanh was merely a diversion to draw US forces away from the populated areas of South Vietnam in order to maximize the effects of the Communists' efforts during the great Tet Offensive of 1968.
Khe Sanh was effectively isolated from overland resupply and would remain so for the next nine months.
By March the PAVN began withdrawing from the Khe Sanh area, and in April the Marine regiment was replaced, allowing it to withdraw via the newly reopened Route 9.
www.library.vanderbilt.edu /central/brush/UnexploitedVulnerability.htm   (2866 words)

  
 I Corps Marine
The Khe Sanh defenders had three batteries of 105mm hoitzers, one battery of 4.2 mortars, and one battery of 155mm howitzers: all five batteries were Marine artillery.
The objective of the reconnaissance phase was the destruction of the enemy antiaircraft resources between Ca Lu and Khe Sanh and the selection of the landing zones for use by the advancing airmobile assault forces.
The battle of Khe Sanh established that, with sufficient fire power, an encircled position could be successfully held and the enemy devastated.
www.willpete.com /i_corps_marine.htm   (3153 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Battle of Khe Sanh   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Khe Sahn was a U.S. Marine outpost in South Vietnam used during the Vietnam War.
Khe Sanh was a forward airfield in the Republic of Vietnam ("the south") constructed near the border with Laos and just south of the border with North Vietnam which became the scene of a huge battle of wills between the North Vietnamese Army (NVA) and US Marines in 1967.
Khe Sanh itself was eventually abandoned since it no longer had any military value.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Battle-of-Khe-Sanh   (970 words)

  
 The Withdrawal from Khe Sanh
After the North Vietnamese Army (NVA) surrounded the Marine position at Khe Sanh, allied forces were unable to inhibit this infiltration; it became too dangerous for the Marines to leave their base in sufficient numbers to greatly affect the movement of enemy forces.
Despite the fact that Khe Sanh was encircled by enemy troops, the U.S. Defense Department claimed that the fortress blocked five avenues of infiltration from Laos into South Vietnam.
General Westmoreland had built up the Marine force at Khe Sanh to approximately 6,000 men, a figure that represented a balance between the number that could be effectively supplied and the force level necessary to ensure adequate defense of the combat base.
www.historynet.com /vn/blwithdrawalfromkhesanh   (1266 words)

  
 sanchoi_15
Khe Sanh is a tiny village in Central Vietnam.
Khe Sanh were further protected by heavy artillery, as far as the 7th Fleet from the Pacific ocean, helicopters, jets, and the fleet of B-52 bombers that could level the whole city in seconds.
A museum was built in the middle of the tourist area to commemorate the battle of Khe Sanh.
www.angelfire.com /ks3/hodacduy0/sanchoi/sanchoi_15.htm   (1247 words)

  
 Airpower at Khe Sanh--August 1998
In effect, the enemy at Khe Sanh re-fought the battle of Dien Bien Phu with the same equipment and tactics, seeking to tighten the noose around the base and then shelling it with artillery, rockets, and mortars.
The first four raids at Khe Sanh resulted in many secondary explosions and fires in the area near the defensive perimeter, proof that the enemy was still using his safety zone tactics.
Second, the forces he had allowed to be decimated around Khe Sanh could have been employed to far greater advantage in support of the Tet offensive, which proved to be an unmitigated military disaster for the Communists, who suffered an estimated 45,000 casualties.
www.afa.org /magazine/Aug1998/0898khesanh.asp   (3375 words)

  
 Sanh Khe Sanh Veterans Home Page. Dedicated To All Who Served And Died At Khe Sanh 1962 - 1972. Our Fo   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Khe Sanh was one of the most remote outposts in Vietnam, but by January 1968, even President With Khe Sanh facing a full-scale siege by the North Vietnamese.
The Khe Sanh Commanders were created and commissioned in 1987 and competed in the CBA Lucre League fought in and around the Khe Sanh area between 1967 and 1968 during.
Khe Sanh Veterans are any and all who during these years served, lived, flew over or drove through, supported the Khe Sanh Combat Base and the Hills, or.
www.99hosted.com /names15256.html   (552 words)

  
 Ross & Perry, Inc. - The Battle for Khe Sanh
The enemy primary objectove of his 1968 TET Offensive was to seize power in South Vietnam by creating a general uprising and causing the defection of major elements of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Vietnam.
The virtually unpoplulated Khe Sanh Plateau, which lay astride the enemy principal avenue of approach from his large base areas in Laos, was obviously an initial objective of the North Vietnamese Army.
There is also little doubt that the enemy hoped at Khe Sanh to attain a climactic victory, such as he had done in 1954 at Dien Bien Phu, in the expectation that this would produce a psychological shock and erode American morale.
www.rossperry.com /details.asp?from=other&id=176   (404 words)

  
 Khe Sanh   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Of particular interest is the detailed account of the Hill Battles in the Khe Sanh area in April 1967, during which the Marines drove a reinforced regiment of North Vietnamese troops from several key hills nearby.
As for the ground fighting, Khe Sanh was primarily a series of short, sharp probing fights, during which the defenders of the base and its outlying hilltop strong points took a heavy toll of the enemy, and the enemy continued to bombard the camp by mortar, rocket, and artillery.
The Marine commander at Khe Sanh had control of the area out to the range of his 155mm artillery, but even within this zone the ABCCC was supposed to have a degree of traffic control.
www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil /airchronicles/aureview/1970/nov-dec/greenhalgh.html   (2243 words)

  
 COSMIC BASEBALL ASSOCIATION-1987 Khe Sanh Commanders
The Khe Sanh Commanders were created and commissioned in 1987 and competed in the CBA Lucre League.
In one sense, the battle of Khe Sanh in the province of Quang Tri in the country of Vietnam, remains a microcosm of the ambiguities so prevalent at the time, both in Vietnam and in the United States.
Khe Sanh was Col. Lownds' first Vietnam assignment and he remained in command of the 26th Marines through the siege.
www.cosmicbaseball.com /87kc.html   (3483 words)

  
 VFW Magazine: Deadly struggle in the hills: the first battle of Khe Sanh: in the spring of 1967, elements of the 3rd ...
VFW Magazine: Deadly struggle in the hills: the first battle of Khe Sanh: in the spring of 1967, elements of the 3rd and 9th Marines clashed with the North Vietnamese Army in the "Hill Fights."
Deadly struggle in the hills: the first battle of Khe Sanh: in the spring of 1967, elements of the 3rd and 9th Marines clashed with the North Vietnamese Army in the "Hill Fights."
Khe Sanh, tucked away in the northwest section of South Vietnam, overlooked a major infiltration route during the war.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m0LIY/is_1_92/ai_n6335019   (1296 words)

  
 KheSanh
The actions around Khe Sanh Combat Base, when flashed to the world, touched off a political and public uproar as to whether or not the position should be held.
The base at Khe Sanh remained relatively quiet throughout the first week of the enemy Tet offensive, but the lull ended with a heavy ground attack on the morning of 5 February.
On 15 February, one of the most lucrative targets, an ammunition storage area, was pinpointed 19 kilometers south southwest of Khe Sanh in the Co Roc Mountain region.
www.militaryunits.com /khesanh.htm   (3383 words)

  
 The Khe Sanh Veterans' Reunion, Peter Brush
In July, 1993, the Khe Sanh Veterans Association held a reunion in Washington, DC, to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the 1968 battle at Khe Sanh.
About 300 Khe Sanh veterans from all the military services, plus their supporting personnel, overran the Holiday Inn in Georgetown in an operation that commenced on 30 June 1993.
The Khe Sanh vets were treated to a fine lunch in the Officer's Club, hosted by a brigadier general.
lists.village.virginia.edu /sixties/HTML_docs/Texts/Narrative/Brush_Reunion.html   (2521 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Battle of Khe Sanh Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Khe Sanh was a United States Marines military base in the Republic of Vietnam ("the south") constructed near the border with Laos and just south of the border with North Vietnam which became the scene of a huge battle of wills between the North Vietnamese Army (NVA) and US Marines in 1967.
The NVA eventually abandoned their assaults at the start of the Tet Offensive after heavy casualties on both sides.
Efforts on the part of the NVA to reopen the battle soon started following their earlier successful efforts at Dien Ben Phu, and they started the construction of a major trenchwork/tunnel system in an attempt to enter the base under cover.
www.ipedia.com /battle_of_khe_sanh.html   (1214 words)

  
 Simply Audiobooks - Hill Fights: The First Battle of Khe Sanh by Edward F. Murphy
The Marines at the isolated Khe Sanh Combat Base were tasked with monitoring the strategically vital Ho Chi Minh trail as it wound through the jungles in nearby Laos.
Murphy traces the bitter account of the U.S. Marines at Khe Sanh from the outset in 1966, revealing misguided decisions and strategies from above, and capturing the chain of hill battles in stark detail.
The story of the Marines at Khe Sanh in early 1967 is a microcosm of the Corps's entire Vietnam War and goes a long way toward explaining why their casualties in Vietnam exceeded, on a Marine-in-combat basis, even the tremendous losses the Leathernecks sustained during their ferocious Pacific island battles of World War II.
simplyaudiobooks.com /audio-books/Hill+Fights:+The+...+Khe+Sanh/16709   (406 words)

  
 Against the Odds
The turning point of the American war in Vietnam occurred during the first months of 1968, a period framed by the Tet Offensive as well as the campaign featured here, the fighting for Khe Sanh.
Khe Sanh was the outpost intended to block and seal off the NVA's access to Quang Tri from the west, from Laos where many of their base areas were located.
In early 1968 the NVA countered by assembling large forces around Khe Sanh, threatening a battle for the place.
www.atomagazine.com /game_01-2.html   (314 words)

  
 Têt Offensive, Huê, Khe Sanh, Làng Vây, Bibliography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Khe Sanh: siege in the clouds: an oral history.
KROHN, Charles A. The lost battalion: controversy and casualties in the Battle of Hue.
Battle of Huê; (Vietnam), 1968 - Tet Offensive, 1968 - Vietnamese Conflict, 1961-1975--Atrocities.
users.skynet.be /terrorism/html/vietnam_tet.htm   (782 words)

  
 Peter Brush's Webpage
The 1968 seige of Khe Sanh the longest and most bitterly contested battle of the war.
Operation Niagara at Khe Sanh has been called the biggest bombing campaign in the history of aerial warfare.
"The Battle of Khe Sanh, 1968," in The Tet Offensive, Marc J. Gilbert and William Head, eds., Westport, CT: Praeger, 1996, ch.
www.library.vanderbilt.edu /central/brush/brush.htm   (1670 words)

  
 Operation Pegasus
On D plus 1 and D plus 2, all elements would continue to attack west toward Khe Sanh.
Cavalry Division would land three battalions southwest of Khe Sanh and attack northwest.
The battle of Khe Sanh established that, with sufficient firepower, an encircled position could be successfully held and the enemy devastated.
prek.dhs.org /vvets/OperationPegasus.htm   (906 words)

  
 Moïse's Bibliography: Têt and Khe Sanh
Corbett, a Marine private, arrived in Vietnam at the beginning of January, 1968, and was immediately sent to Khe Sanh, where he served in the 81mm mortar platoon of Headquarters & Service Company, 26th Marine Regiment.
He was in Vietnam until January 1969, but the book is mainly devoted to his time at Khe Sanh, January to April 1968.
The remainder of the file is a set of what appear to be attachments to some other report, dealing with operations of the 4th Infantry Division from 1 May to 31 July 1968 in Operation MacArthur.
www.clemson.edu /caah/history/facultypages/EdMoise/tet.html   (2028 words)

  
 Battle of Khe Sanh, The/ Screaming Eagles in Vietnam   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Battle of Khe Sanh, The/ Screaming Eagles in Vietnam
Currently, there are not enough Tomatometer critic reviews for Battle of Khe Sanh, The/ Screaming Eagles in Vietnam to receive a rating.
In "battle," 6000 brave U.S. soldiers fight off the fiercest of the Viet Cong for 70 days and nights.
www.rottentomatoes.com /m/battle_of_khe_sanh_the_screaming_eagles_in_vietnam?rtp=1   (354 words)

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