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Topic: Battle of Lostwithiel


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In the News (Sun 21 Apr 19)

  
  Learn more about List of battles (alphabetical) in the online encyclopedia.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
Battle of Covadonga - 722 - Moslem Conquest of Spain
Battle of Mohacs - 1526 - Turkish Conquest of Hungary
Battle of Pavia (773) - Conquests of Charlemagne
www.onlineencyclopedia.org /l/li/list_of_battles__alphabetical_.html   (4758 words)

  
 English Civil War - Wikipedia
A latter battle at Edgehill was inconclusive, but regarded by the Royalists as a victory.
The defeat at the Battle of Lostwithiel in Cornwall, however, was a serious reverse for Parliament in the south-west of England.
In two decisive engagements, the Battle of Naseby on June 14 and at Langport[?] on July 10, Charles's armies were effectively destroyed.
wikipedia.findthelinks.com /en/English_Civil_War.html   (2184 words)

  
 Lostwithiel, Cornwall with Restormel Castle   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
Lostwithiel was the capital of Cornwall for a short period in the 13th century and founded by the Normans for the export of tin.
The name 'Lostwithiel' comes from two old Cornish words meaning 'tail of the forest' Its importance was that it was the lowest bridging point on the River Fowey.
Lostwithiel was occupied by Parliamentary soldiers during the Civil War and was besieged by Royalists in August 1644.
www.cornwall-calling.co.uk /gazetter-cornwall/lostwithiel.htm   (299 words)

  
 Battle   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
Generally a battle is an instance of combat between two or more parties wherein group will seek to defeat the others.
Battle is also the name of the in East Sussex England which it acquired after William I also known as William of Normandy Harold II of England nearby in 1066 in the Battle of Hastings.
This, i.e., Misunderestimated: The President Battles Terrorism, John Kerry, and the Bush Haters by Bill Sammon (Author), is riveting portrait of President Bush as he broadens the war on terror overseas -- and plunges into high-stakes political battles at...
www.freeglossary.com /Battle   (543 words)

  
 Battle of Lostwithiel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
After the overwhelming defeat at the Battle of Marston Moor which cost him the entire north England Charles I continued to defy the Parliamentarian forces.
On September 2 1644 Charles 's army attacked the rear of Essex's and quickly surrounded it at Lostwithiel 30 miles west of Plymouth attacking from both the north and east at the same time.
Lostwithiel was important during the English Civil War since it held the key to Fowey at the time a major seaport.
www.freeglossary.com /Battle_of_Lostwithiel   (680 words)

  
 A Brief History of Lostwithiel
Two battles were fought in or near Lostwithiel during the English Civil War of 1642-1646.
In 1801 Lostwithiel was a small settlement with a population of 743.
Lostwithiel was connected to Plymouth by railway in 1859.
www.localhistories.org /lostwithiel.html   (690 words)

  
 Ambushed March   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
From his HQ in Oxford, Charles I marched west in pursuit of Robert Devereux, 3rd Earl of Essex, who was invading the Royalist stronghold of Cornwall.
On September 2 1644, Charles's army attacked the rear of Essex's force and quickly surrounded it at Lostwithiel, 30 miles west of Plymouth, attacking from both the north and the east at the same time.
Lostwithiel was strategically important during the English Civil War since it held the key to Fowey, at the time a major seaport.
www3.telus.net /Quattrocento_Florence/republic/ambushedmarch.html   (406 words)

  
 Lostwithiel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lostwithiel (Cornish: Lostwydhyel) is a civil parish and small town in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom at the head of the estuary of the River Fowey.
Lostwithiel railway station is on the Cornish Main Line from Plymouth to Penzance.
Lostwithiel's most notable buildings are St Bartholomew's Church and Restormel Castle.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lostwithiel   (311 words)

  
 List of battles 1401-1800
Battle of Grunwald or Battle of Zalgiris) July 15 Poles and Lithuanians defeat Teutonic Knights
1428 Battle of Orleans English forces commanded by the Earl of Salisbury with duke of Bedford besiege French city and are driven off with the loss of their siege engines by Joan.
1600 Battle of Nieuwpoort June 2 Battle between Dutch (led by Prince Mauritz) and Spanish army, led by Albrecht, archduke of Austria.
www.fastload.org /li/List_of_battles_1401-1800.html   (2773 words)

  
 Battle of Lostwithiel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
There were two Battles of Lostwithiel, both in the 1640s.
After defeating the Army of Sir William Waller at the Battle of Cropredy Bridge, The king marched west in pursuit of the Army of Robert Devereux, 3rd Earl of Essex, who was invading the Royalist stronghold of Cornwall.
On September 2, 1644, Charles's army attacked the rear of Essex's force and quickly surrounded it at Lostwithiel in Cornwall, 30 miles west of Plymouth, attacking from both the north and the east at the same time.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Battle_of_Lostwithiel   (339 words)

  
 1644: Civil War in the South-West   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
The disruption of Sir William Waller's army following the battle of Cropredy Bridge relieved the pressure on the Royalist capital Oxford.
Essex deployed his forces in a defensive arc with strong concentrations at Beacon Hill to the east of Lostwithiel and Restmorel Castle to the north.
As the disarmed Roundheads marched out of Lostwithiel in the pouring rain, they were set upon and robbed by local Cornishmen, who claimed to be recovering their own plundered property.
www.british-civil-wars.co.uk /military/1644-south-west.htm   (2181 words)

  
 Histoire des deux guerres civiles anglaises au XVIIème siècle - LES DESIRS SOCIALISTES DE JULIEN TOLEDANO
The first (1642–1645) and the second (1648–1649) civil wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) was between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament.
In what were, in retrospect, two decisive engagements—the Battles of Naseby on June 14 and of Langport on July 10—Charles's armies were effectively destroyed.
As the former Member of Parliament Admiral Robert Blake blockaded Prince Rupert of the Rhine's fleet in Kinsale, Oliver Cromwell was able to land at Dublin on August 15, 1649 with the army to quell Royalist alliance in Ireland.
www.politique-info.org /article-1436192-6.html   (4963 words)

  
 [No title]
I have always found the Lostwithiel Campaign much more interesting than any battles I have read about which happened during the Civil War.
In making this quilt my first job was to work out a design, and then to find the fabrics which would be suitable, especially in sewing the armour and leather.
I studied the countryside around Lostwithiel in August, the time of the battle, and was surprised to find how much yellow and brown there was, and not green.
members.lycos.co.uk /crazyquilts/lostwithiel.html   (294 words)

  
 On This Day
Reports that the king refused to engage battle until he finished his prayers are said to be untrue, as he waited until the Danes had moved to a position where he could more easily attack them.
The battle claimed one casualty of great note; Richard Earl of Warwick, who had backed both sides at different stages in the contention, was killed trying to escape from the battlefield.
It is also understood that Prince Edouard, the queen's son, died in the battle, and it is expected that the days of her husband the late King Henry VI, imprisoned in the Tower of London, are now but few.
www.btinternet.com /~brentours/HIST07.htm   (15221 words)

  
 Philip Skippon
At some point around this date Skippon was appointed Sergeant-major-general of Essex's army, and he remained with the field army for most of the rest of the war.
He was thus present at the capture of Reading in April 1643, on Essex's march to relieve Gloucester, and on the march back towards London which ended in the First Battle of Newbury (20 September 1643).
The Battle of Castle Dore (31 August-1 September 1644) saw Essex slip away from his surrounded army, leaving Skippon to suffer the indignity of surrender, having to abandon all of his guns and ammunition, and march his men through the Royalist lines in front of the King.
www.historyofwar.org /articles/people_skippon.html   (845 words)

  
 King Charles I - English Civil War - free Suite101.com course
Again with the Battle of Lostwithiel, which Charles personally commanded, he defeated the Parliamentarians fully, yet allowed thousands of them to march away free, rather than force them to his colours or imprison them.
After he won the battle of Edgehill, the way to Parliamentarian London was free.
This was Charles’s one chance to take his capital and end the war, but it involved an assault against London and its citizens, overrunning Parliament and arresting his opponents.
www.suite101.com /lesson.cfm/19006/2498   (921 words)

  
 Glorious Revolution
A mutiny by three regiments of enlisted men, influenced by the ideas of the Levellers, in May led to the Battle of Burford where the mutiny was brought to an end.
The Battle of Burford and the return of censorship marked the end of the revolutionary drift toward the left.' (p.
The republic changed from the Commonwealth of 1649 to the Protectorate on December 16, 1653, with Oliver Cromwell as the Lord Protector.
faculty.ucc.edu /egh-damerow/glorious_revolution.htm   (5847 words)

  
 1644 : Encyclopedia Entry
July 2 - Battle of Marston Moor, a crushing victory for the Parliamentary side of the English Civil War, ended Charles I's hold on the north of England.
September 1 - Battle of Tippermuir, Montrose defeats Elcho's Covenanters, reviving Royalist cause in Scotland
September 2 - Second Battle of Lostwithiel, the last major victory for Charles I and the Royalist side in the English Civil War.
www.bibleocean.com /OmniDefinition/1644   (571 words)

  
 Lostwithiel Gallery.
Please enjoy this gallery of pictures from Lostwithiel on the Fowey River Valley in the east of the Duchy.
The artist, Simon Mitchell, has lived in Lostwithiel since 1991 and has walked every route in, out and around the town, hunting down and capturing beautiful images.
What you see here are just a few of a growing collection of images fromaround this 'fairest of all small cities'.
www.simonthescribe.co.uk /local/lostgall.html   (178 words)

  
 Decades History Search   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
Lord Cromwell crushed the Royalists at the Battle of Marston Moor near York, England.
Cromwell came from minor gentry in Huntingdon and had served in Parliament before the wars, during which he commanded the Ironsides, a cavalry regiment famous for its discipline and tenacity.
At the Battle at Lostwithiel: Robert Devereux's infantry surrendered.
www.decades.com /ByDecade/1640-1649/3.htm?tlvw=2   (841 words)

  
 World history and events in 1644   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
The battle of Aberdeen is an engagement in the Scottish Civil War between Royalist & Covenanter forces outside the city of Aberdeen
The battle is inconclusive & Charles retreats to Oxford
Commands a Parliamentary regiment at the Battle of Marston Moor
www.badley.info /history/1644.year.html   (1318 words)

  
 Tywardreath History
Nearby is the valley of "Lampetho" which means "the valley of the dead" where it is believed King Mark and his followers were buried.
The Battle of Lostwithiel in the Civil War (1642) was fought on this site.
In Tywardreath Vicarage garden there is an iron cannon ball which was also fired in that battle - how it got there I do not know.
www.tywardreath.org.uk /5his/castledore.html   (555 words)

  
 English Civil War   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
This precipitated the first battle, the first siege of Hull in July 1642, which provided a decisive victory for Parliament.
A later battle at Edgehill was inconclusive, but claimed by both the Royalist and Parliamentarian sides as a victory.
In two decisive engagements, the Battles of Naseby on June 14 and of Langport on July 10, Charles's armies were effectively destroyed.
www.info-pedia.net /about/english_civil_war   (4652 words)

  
 Military Prints, Battle of Naseby
Military art prints of the English Civil War including the Battle of Naseby by leading military artists, published by Cranston Fine Arts, the military print company.
But in 1644 after the Battle of Marston Moor a Victory for Oliver Cromwell and the parliamentarian army, (known as the New Model Army).
Cavalier trumpeters are shown advancing with King Charles 1sts cavalry during the Battle of Naseby.
www.war-art.com /naseby.htm   (1113 words)

  
 Lostwithiel Galler
Lie taking a little holiday in Cornwall in the summer !Please enjoy these images from around Lostwithiel, a place with ancient history in every stone.
What you see here is a mix - some of these are digital photos and some are digitally altered towards 'art effects'.
All are from the Fowey River Valley area around Lostwithiel.
www.simonthescribe.co.uk /local/lostgallmins.html   (148 words)

  
 Today in History September 2   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-10)
31BC Sep 2, Famous Naval Battle of Actium in the Ionian Sea, between Roman leader Octavian and the alliance of Roman Mark Antony and Cleopatra, queen of Egypt.
1384 Sep 2, Louis I, duke of Anjou and king of Naples (Battle of Poitiers), died.
In 1899 Winston Churchill published "The River War, An Account of the Reconquest of the Soudan." This was the 1st use of the machine gun in battle.
timelines.ws /days/09_02.HTML   (4592 words)

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