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Topic: Baudot code


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In the News (Wed 17 Jul 19)

  
  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Baudot code
The Baudot code, named after its inventor Emile Baudot, is a character set predating EBCDIC and ASCII and used originally and primarily on teleprinters.
Baudot's original code is known as International Telegraph Alphabet No 1, and is no longer used.
Baudot code was then improved by Donald Murray[?] by adding extra characters and shift codes.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/ba/Baudot_code   (290 words)

  
 Baudot code - Definition, explanation
The Baudot code, named after its inventor Émile Baudot, is a character set predating EBCDIC and ASCII and used originally and primarily on teleprinters.
Baudot's original code, developed around 1874 is known as International Telegraph Alphabet No 1, and is no longer used.
The Russian version of Baudot code (MTK-2) used three shift modes, the Cyrillic letter mode was activated by the character (00000) unused in original ITA2.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/b/ba/baudot_code.php   (589 words)

  
  Baudot code
The Baudot code, named after its inventor Emile Baudot, is a character set predating EBCDIC and ASCII and used originally and primarily on teleprinters.
Baudot's original code is known as International Telegraph Alphabet No 1, and is no longer used.
Baudot code was then improved by Donald Murray[?] by adding extra characters and shift codes.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ba/Baudot_code.html   (0 words)

  
 Baudot Code - Computer Science Now
Baudot code extends the character set to 55 characters by using two codes, LTRS and FIGS, as shift controls.
The Baudot code was used for years for sending telegrams, and is mainly used today for TTY communications by the deaf.
Baudot code is typically transmitted using an asynchronous serial protocol.
www.comsci.us /datacom/baudot.html   (302 words)

  
 NADCOMM Photo's   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Code elements 1, 2 and 3 are transmitted by keys 1, 2 and 3, and these are operated by the first three fingers of the right hand.
Code elements 4 and 5 are transmitted by keys 4 and 5, and these are operated by the first two fingers of the left hand.
The code employed was still a five- unit code, with the start signal equal in duration to one code element, and the stop signal being in some cases equal in duration to one code element, and in other case more than one element – often 1.5 elements.
www.nadcomm.com /fiveunit/fiveunits.htm   (0 words)

  
 Karsten Behrend
In Baudot's code, each letter was represented by a five-unit combination of current-on or current-off signals of equal duration; this represented a substantial economy over the Morse system of short dots and long dashes.
This is the version of the Baudot code that was the grandfather of all modern character codes such as the ASCII code and IBM's EBCDIC code.
Four of Baudot's remaining thirty codes were assigned for blank, space, carriage return and line feed codes are interpreted with the same meaning same in both upper and lower shift modes, leaving 26 remaining character combinations available: the letters of the alphabet.
www.hallikainen.org /cuesta/et153/StudentPapers/Baudot/Behrend.html   (0 words)

  
 Problem #1: Baudot Data Communication Code
A code used early in the data communications industry is the Baudot code.
As a technique used to extend this limitation, the code uses up-shift and down-shift modes as is used on a typewriter.
The complete BAUDOT code (modified for this problem) is shown in the table at the end of this problem.
www.acm.inf.ethz.ch /ProblemSetArchive/B_US_EastCen/1988/baudot.htm   (359 words)

  
 Baudot code - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Baudot code, named after its inventor Émile Baudot, is a character set predating EBCDIC and ASCII and used originally and primarily on teleprinters.
Around 1901 Baudot's code was modified by Donald Murray (1865-1945) by re-ordering the characters, adding extra characters and shift codes.
The Russian version of Baudot code (MTK-2) used three shift modes, the Cyrillic letter mode was activated by the character (00000) unused in original ITA2.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Baudot_code   (0 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Messages encoded in Baudot's code were printed out on narrow two-channel transmission tapes by operators who created them using a special five-key keypad, although in later versions typewriter keyboards that automatically generated the proper five-unit sequences were employed.
Baudot's system proved to be fairly successful, and it remained in widespread use in the 20th century until it was displaced by the telephone, and, of course, personal computer communications.
The reason Baudot was forced to limit his character code to 5 bits--and hence leave out the lower case Latin letters--was because of hardware constraints.
timeline.textfiles.com /1874/00/00/1/FILES/baudot.txt   (0 words)

  
 Method and apparatus utilizing Baudot code for categorizing and selectively distributing information to a plurality of ...
With this arrangement, some of the Baudot code characters used to represent letters of the alphabet can also be used to represent numerals with such "common" characters being distinguishable by whether a "letter shift" character or "figure shift" character preceded the "common" character.
This coding is carried out with the Baudot code in such a fashion that currently used printer devices effectively ignore the category code information and thus are not caused to print this information (which would be of no use to a subscriber such as a newspaper) or take any other undesired action.
In the manner described, news information produced by the message generator 4 is coded in the Baudot code to identify the different news categories and this coding is then utilized by the decoder 34 and control unit 38 to store the information in different areas of the memory 46.
www.freepatentsonline.com /4052737.html   (3758 words)

  
 Emile Baudot By Johnny Jung
Emile Baudot was born in 1845, Magneux, France and died on March1903, Sceaux.
Baudot used a different type of code for his system because Morse code didn't lend itself to automation, this was due to the uneven length and size of bits required for each letter.
It was in August, 1874 that he received his first patent on a telegraph code that by the mid-20th century had supplanted Morse Code as the most commonly used telegraphic alphabet.
www.hallikainen.org /cuesta/et153/StudentPapers/Baudot/Jung.html   (0 words)

  
 Baudot Code Table
Baudot's code was replaced by Murray's code in 1901.
The 'baudot' code has been used extensively in telegraph systems.
It is a five bit code invented by the Frenchman Emile Baudot in 1870.
www.dataip.co.uk /Reference/BaudotTable.php   (213 words)

  
 Emile Baudot
Jean Maurice Emile Baudot (1845-1903) was a French engineer who invented the first digital Telecommunications code and hardware.
The code must say that the first character is a letter, and that the second is a number.
His code is the direct forerunner of the present day ASCII code.
www.sonic.net /~john1/ebaudot   (513 words)

  
 World Power Systems:Texts:Annotated history of character codes
It is a variable-length code, designed so that the most common characters are short -- the letter "E" is a single symbol, while "1", occurring less often, is five symbols (considering that for human purposes the dit or dah and the brief space that follows it is a unit).
Codes were generated by a device with five piano-like keys, operated with two fingers on the left hand, and three from the right.
Where Morse's code was asymetrical and frequent letters brief, Baudot's code is arranged to minimize hand and finger motion and fatigue, and to "make sense" to the human hand.
www.wps.com /projects/codes/index.html   (4886 words)

  
 Baudot and CCITT codes
The Baudot code, invented in 1870 and patented in 1874 by J. Baudot is a five-bit binary code.
The Baudot code includes two 30-symbol character sets, and two Shift symbols, the shift symbols are used to shift between the two character sets, thereby allowing for 60 different symbols.
It was very common for Baudot code to be used in conjunction with a paper tape punch and reader; teletype machines often had an integral paper tape unit.
rabbit.eng.miami.edu /info/baudot.html   (0 words)

  
 Baudot Character Code Reference
The earliest Baudot devices were essentially modified typewriters, so the two shift codes performed the same function as setting or releasing the SHIFT LOCK key on a standard typewriter keyboard, mechanically selecting the top or bottom set of characters on the print hammers that would be used from that point on.
The Baudot character code was also used in the early "5-level" two-wire and radio-based "Teleprinters" that appeared early in the 20th century.
Essentially this code is the original CCITT/ITU assignments with three differences: Two codes previously undefined by the CCITT are adopted from the Western Union/US character set ("!" and "&"), and the third code that was previously undefined by the CCITT is assigned to the British Sterling Pound symbol.
nemesis.lonestar.org /reference/telecom/codes/baudot.html   (1145 words)

  
 CTO Sea Dogs   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This code is what is generally known as the 'Baudot code', also known as the International Telegraph Alphabet No 2 (ITA2).
The original Baudot code defined the familiar structure of a 5-level code set, using LTRS and FIGS case shifting, and became known as the International Telegraph Alphabet 1 (ITA1).
While Baudot's code was designed with finger-actuation in mind, Murray's code was designed for mechanization, to minimize machine wear for frequently-occuring characters.
groups.msn.com /ctoseadogs/baudotcode1.msnw   (0 words)

  
 Baudot Code - Codes & Cyphers
However, the Baudot code cleverly used 11111 to indicate characters in the Letters type column and 11011 to indicate characters in the Figures type column (see http://tronweb.super-nova.co.jp/characcodehist.html).
The invention and implementation of the Baudot code was a huge advance in the ability to transmit text-type data.
Although no longer in use, the Baudot code left its mark on the terminology used to describe the rate at which data is transmitted.
www.bellaonline.com /articles/art35060.asp   (0 words)

  
 The First Printing Telegraphs
The two-channel paper tape technique pioneered by Sir Charles Wheatstone was subsequently extended to handle the Baudot Code.
In the case of the Baudot Code, twenty-six of these combinations were used for letters of the alphabet, leaving eight spare combinations for an idle code, a space code, a letter-shift code, and so on.
this dilemma, the letter-shift code was used to emulate the shift key on a typewriter by instructing the receiver that any subsequent codes were to be treated as uppercase characters (in this context, uppercase was used to refer to numbers, punctuation, and special symbols).
www.maxmon.com /1880ad.htm   (0 words)

  
 Adventures in CyberSound: Baudot, Jean-Maurice-Émile
In Baudot's code, each letter was represented by a five-unit combination of current-on or current-off signals of equal duration; this represented a substantial economy over the Morse system of short dots and long dashes.
Baudot also invented (1894) a distributor system for simultaneous (multiplex) transmission of several messages on the same telegraphic circuit or channel.
In Baudot's alphabet (not code) the signals which created the letters differed not only in length but also in their respective position.
www.acmi.net.au /AIC/BAUDOT_BIO.html   (390 words)

  
 Baudot code Summary
Baudot code is a character set (a mapping between characters and bit strings) that preceded the more sophisticated character set EBCDIC (Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code), which was developed in the 1960s by International Business Machines (IBM) Corporation.
Baudot code was one of the first standards for international telegraphy.
The Russian version of Baudot code (MTK-2) used three shift modes, the Cyrillic letter mode was activated by the character (00000) unused in original ITA2.
www.bookrags.com /Baudot_code   (1153 words)

  
 Bambooweb: Baudot code
The Baudot code, named after its inventor Émile Baudot, is a character set predating EBCDIC and ASCII and used originally and primarily on teleprinters.
Baudot's original code, developed around 1874 is known as International Telegraph Alphabet No 1, and is no longer used.
The FIGS character (11011) signals that the following code is to be interpreted as being in the FIGS set, until this is reset by the LTRS (11111) character.
www.bambooweb.com /articles/b/a/Baudot_code.html   (468 words)

  
 Baudot
Jean-Maurice-Emile Baudot was born in Magneux (Haute-Marne) the 11th of September, 1845.
On June 17, 1874, Baudot patented, under the number 103,898 and the title "System of rapid telegraphy" his first apparatus, which was both multiple and really printing, since the conventional signals were translated automatically into typographic characters.
Baudot died on March 28, 1903, at Sceaux, France, near Paris, at the age of fifty-seven, after a long time illness.
chem.ch.huji.ac.il /~eugeniik/history/baudot.html   (1508 words)

  
 Dead Media: Paper Tape
The system brought out in 1874 by Émile Baudot and since considerably developed is a multiplex system giving from two to six channels on one wire, each channel giving a working speed of thirty words per minute....
A computer programmer, looking at Baudot, is struck by how the letters and numbers are not ordered by their binary numeric representation.
Surplus Baudot code teleprinters with built-in modems were also distributed to hearing-impared individuals who could then communicate independently.
www.merrymeet.com /minow/papertape/papertape.html   (0 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
The Baudot code, named after its inventor Émile Baudot, is a character set predating EBCDIC and ASCII, and the root predecessor to International Telegraph Alphabet No 2 (ITA2), the teleprinter code in use until the advent of ASCII.
Around 1901 Baudot's code was modified by Donald Murray (1865-1945) by re-ordering the characters, adding extra characters and shift codes.
CR is carriage return, LF is line feed, BEL is the bell character which rang a small bell (often used to alert operators to an incoming message), SP is space, and NUL is the null character (blank tape).
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=baudot_code   (724 words)

  
 On the origins of serial communications and data encoding
The first widely used character code for electronically processing textual data in the American West in the 19th century was Morse code, which was invented for transmitting messages via telegraph lines.
As it was not clear to anyone that the code could be interpreted by people as it was received, an elaborate machine called a “telegraph register” was designed that used the electromagnet to emboss a strip of paper that was pulled past it with a clockwork mechanism.
Baudot also left a portion of his name to posterity in the form of the “Baud rate,” which refers to the number of data signaling events that occur in a second.
www.compkarori.com /dbase/bu07sh.htm   (0 words)

  
 More on 'Baudot Code'.
To carry out your research for the term baudot code, checking out the Connected Earth website should be rewarding.
It's a complete multi-media experience, where you'll be able to choose from straightforward descriptions, more detailed exploration, pictures of artefacts in 3D, written or spoken stories from those who used to work in the telecommunications industry, short movies, and interactive explanations or simple animations of how technology works.
Connected Earth is a good website to further your study of the subject baudot code.
www.connected-earth.com /content/baudot_code.html   (267 words)

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