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Topic: Behistun Inscription


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In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  Behistun Inscription - Cyrus Cylinder - Crystalinks
The Behistun Inscription is to cuneiform what the Rosetta Stone is to Egyptian hieroglyphs: the document most crucial in the decipherment of a previously lost script.
The inscription was noted by an Arab traveller, Ibn Hawqal, in the mid-900s, who interpreted the figures as a teacher punishing his pupils.
Italian explorer Pietro della Valle visited the inscription in the course of a pilgrimage in around 1621, and German surveyor Carsten Niebuhr visited in around 1764 while exploring Arabia and the middle east for Frederick V of Denmark, publishing a copy of the inscription in the account of his journeys in 1777.
www.crystalinks.com /cyrustablets.html   (1665 words)

  
  Behistun Inscription - Encyclopedia.com
Behistun Inscription or Bisutun Inscription, cuneiform text, the decipherment of which was the key to all cuneiform script and opened to scholars the study of the written works of ancient Mesopotamia.
The inscription in Old Persian, in Susian (the Iranian language of Elam), and in Assyrian is chiseled on the face of a mountainous rock c.300 ft (90 m) above the ground at Behistun, Persia (modern W Iran).
the Aveta and the Achaemenid Inscriptions (Minneapolis: Univ. of Minnesota...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Behistun.html   (711 words)

  
 Behistun Inscription
The Behistun Inscription (also Behistûn, Bisutun, and Bisistun) is to cuneiform what the Rosetta Stone is to Egyptian hieroglyphs: the document most crucial in the decipherment of a previously lost script.
The inscription is approximately 15 metres high by 25 metres wide, and 100 metres up a cliff from an ancient road connecting the capitals of Babylonia and Media (Babylon and Ecbatana).
In 1598 the inscription came to the attention of Western Europe when it was seen by Robert Sherley, an Englishman on a diplomatic mission to Persia in the service of Austria.
www.findword.org /be/behistun-inscription.html   (1005 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Darius I of Persia
The principal source for his history is his own inscriptions, especially the great inscription of Behistun, in which he relates how he gained the crown and put down the rebellions.
Darius in his inscriptions appears as a fervent believer in the true religion of Zoroaster.
The details given by Herodotus (according to him Darius had reached the Volga!) are quite fantastical; and the account which Darius himself had given on a tablet, which was added to his great inscription in Behistun[?], is destroyed with the exception of a few words.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/da/Darius_I_of_Persia   (1096 words)

  
 Inscription: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library
Long after, in Persia, the Achaemenids revived cuneiform writing in an altered form; their chief monument is the Behistun Inscriptions (c.500 b.c.) of Darius I. In Egypt the hieroglyphic epigraphy had a parallel development.
From the I dynasty (4th millennium b.c.), inscriptions of the Nile present a grand panorama of history, past the age of the pyramid to the XII dynasty, heyday of hieroglyphic writing, then to the New Empire, with the splendid rock inscriptions at Thebes.
The Aramaic inscription on the limestone ossuary was deemed...evidence for the biblical Jesus.
www.questia.com /library/encyclopedia/inscription.jsp   (2044 words)

  
 Behistun
The Behistun inscription is a carved relief, a royal proclamation carved by Darius I on the great cliff known as "Mountain of the Gods" which celebrates his initial victories when taking power and consolidating the empire.
His attention was turned to the cuneiform inscriptions at Elwend near Ecbatana, and, as a soldier whose scholarly side ill brooked long periods of boredom, he set himself to decipher the strange unknown tongue in which they were written.
Since all other inscriptions copied up to that time were too short and limited, it proved impossible to use his probable decipherment of the one language as a key to the understanding of the other two.
members.ozemail.com.au /~ancientpersia/behistun.html   (9718 words)

  
 Iran: Documentation of Behistun Inscription Nearly Complete
The Behistun inscription (also Behistun, Bisutun, and Bisistun) is to cuneiform what the Rosetta Stone is to Egyptian hieroglyphs: the document most crucial in the decipherment of a previously lost script.
The inscription is approximately 15 meters high by 25 meters wide, and 100 meters up a cliff from an ancient road connecting the capitals of Babylonia and Media (Babylon and Ecbatana).
In 1598 the inscription came to the attention of Western Europe when it was seen by Robert Sherley, an Englishman on a diplomatic mission to Persia in the service of Austria.
www.payvand.com /news/04/aug/1149.html   (991 words)

  
 Behistun Inscription - Definition, explanation
The Behistun Inscription (also Bisitun or Bisutun, بیستون in modern Persian) is to cuneiform what the Rosetta Stone is to Egyptian hieroglyphs: the document most crucial in the decipherment of a previously lost script.
The inscription is approximately 15 metres high by 25 metres wide, and 100 metres up a cliff from an ancient road connecting the capitals of Babylonia and Media (Babylon and Ecbatana).
The inscription was illustrated by a life-sized bas-relief of Darius, two servants, and ten one-metre figures representing conquered peoples; the god Ahura Mazda floats above, giving his blessing to the king.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/b/be/behistun_inscription.php   (1122 words)

  
 Documentation of Behistun Inscription Nearly Complete - CAIS Archaeological & Cultural Daily News of Iran©
The Behistun inscription (also Behistun, Bisutun, and Bisistun) is to cuneiform what the Rosetta Stone is to Egyptian hieroglyphs: the document most crucial in the decipherment of a previously lost script.
The inscription is approximately 15 meters high by 25 meters wide, and 100 meters up a cliff from an ancient road connecting the capitals of Babylon and Ecbatana.
Some time around 515 BC, he arranged for the inscription of a long ode of his accession in the face of the usurper Geomata (and Darius' subsequent successful wars and suppressions of rebellion) to be inscribed into a cliff in the Zagros Mountains of Iran, just as one reaches them from the Kermanshah Plain.
www.cais-soas.com /News/2004/august2004/16-08.htm   (1053 words)

  
 Behistun Inscription - Article from FactBug.org - the fast Wikipedia mirror site
The Behistun Inscription (also Bisitun or Bisutun, بیستون in modern Persian) is to cuneiform what the Rosetta Stone is to Egyptian hieroglyphs: the document most crucial in the decipherment of a previously lost script.
For centuries, instead of being attributed to Darius — one of the first Persian kings — it was believed to be from the reign of Chosroes II of Persia — one of the last.
It was not until 1598, when the Englishman Robert Sherley saw the inscription during a diplomatic mission to Persia on behalf of Austria, that the inscription first came to the attention of western European scholars.
www.factbug.org /cgi-bin/a.cgi?a=4789   (1095 words)

  
 Archaeology Wordsmith   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The inscriptions were carved in the cuneiform script, and repeated in the Old Persian, Elamite, and Babylonian languages.
In total, the area covered by the inscriptions and the relief panel were about 25-feet high and 50-feet wide.
As a result, his "Persian Cuneiform Inscription at Behistun" was published (1846-51) -- containing a complete translation, analysis of the grammar, and notes.
www.reference-wordsmith.com /cgi-bin/lookup.cgi?exact=1&terms=Behistun   (274 words)

  
 Behistun Inscription
The inscription was illustrated by a life-sized bas-relief of Darius, holding a bow as a sign of kingship, with his left foot on the chest of a figure lying on his back before him.
The inscription was noted by an Arab traveller, Ibn Hawqal, in the mid-900s, who interpreted the figures as a teacher punishing his pupils.
Italian explorer Pietro della Valle visited the inscription in the course of a pilgrimage in around 1621, and German surveyor Carsten Niebuhr visited in around 1764 while exploring Arabia and the middle east for Frederick V of Denmark, publishing a copy of the inscription in the account of his journeys in 1777.
behistun-inscription.zdnet.co.za /zdnet/Behistun_Inscription   (1719 words)

  
 Darius Inscription at Behistun
INSCRIPTION OF Connecting the House of Israel with European tribes.
This inscription, which was cut circa 516 B.C., records in three languages – Persian, Susian (Median), and Babylonian –; the names of twenty-three provinces subject to him.
In the Babylonian text this province is called “(matu) Gi-mi-ri”, translated “land of the Cimmerians.” Sir Henry Rawlinson, who first copied and translated the inscription – although not disposed definitely to identify these Gimiri with the Cimmerians (Kimmerii or Cumri) – was prepared to accept the probability of a connection between them.
www.israelite.info /Source_Documents/MainPageSourceDocuments_Folder/Persian.htm   (1983 words)

  
 iranian.com: Touraj Daryaee, Darius the Great inscription, touching god Ahura Mazda
The inscription is important for many reasons, not least for being the key to the decipherment of the cuneiform script which was used for the Old Persian, Babylonian and Elamite versions of the inscription.
Lastly, the inscription demonstrates the religious conviction of Darius and his devotion to his god, Ahuramazda, the “Wise Lord.” It is by the grace of Ahuramazda that Darius became king; it is Ahuramazda who bore him aid in defeating his enemies, and it is Ahuramazda who made him king.
This was not because the head of the Behistun project had told me that if the scaffolding breaks and I die, it is not her responsibility, but rather, I was one of the few fortunate souls who were able to get close to Darius and his inscription.
www.iranian.com /History/2005/August/Darius/index.html   (831 words)

  
 Behistun Inscription - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Behistun Inscription, cuneiform writing on the precipitous limestone rock of a mountain above the village of Behistun, in western Iran.
From early Paleolithic times people had lived in the land that came to be known as Assyria, a fact confirmed by two adult Neandertal skulls...
Inscription, writing cut, scratched, or impressed on a durable material as a record.
encarta.msn.com /Behistun_Inscription.html   (119 words)

  
 Inscription - Altman: Zoilos Votive Inscription
The Behistun inscription is a "rosetta stone" for Old Persian, Elamite, and Akkadian language.
Inscription on the pedestal of the Jaya Varma- sculpture, length 42 cm.
The Relative Velocity Inscription Device (RVID) is a live scientific experiment using the DNA of a multi-racial family of Jamaican descent.
fpinfo.info /byne/inscription.html   (481 words)

  
 Arachosia (Harauvatiya:Sarasvati!], Vedic, Avestan; Hrvat (Croat), Sarasvat   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The inscriptions are carved in both pictures and writing on a limestone cliff at Behistun, above the main highway between Ecbatana (the capital city of Media) and Babylon.
The Behistun Inscription is an engraving on a cliff about 350 feet off the ground.{1} It is near the modern town of Bisitun, on the road between Ecbatana and Babylon.{2} King Darius I of Persia had it cut in the rock at the time of one of his great military victories.
A few years after Rawlinson first published his translations of the Behistun inscription, he and another scholar, W. Fox talbot, were independently working on translating a cuneiform inscription of Tiglath Pileser I. When Talbot finished, he submitted his results sealed, suggesting that if the translations were similar, it would prove that the language was unlocked.
www.hindunet.org /saraswati/behistun/behistun.htm   (16582 words)

  
 Behistun inscription - WCD (Wiki Classical Dictionary)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Behistun inscription is a long text on Persian history, engraved on a cliff about 100 meters off the ground along the road between modern Hamadan (Iran) and Baghdad (Iraq), near the town of Bisotun.
One of his servants was a Frenchman, Abel Pinson, who wrote that the serail of Behistun was situated under a very high cliff on which he had seen a representation of 'the ascension of our Lord' with an inscription in Greek.
In the Behistun inscription Darius also told how he had suppressed several rebellions against the Persian hegemony and how he had defeated the nomads of the Central Asian steppe against whom the legendary Persian king Cyrus the Great had fought in vain.
www.ancientlibrary.com /wcd/Behistun_inscription   (1338 words)

  
 Darius the Great - WikIran
Darius was the son of Hystaspes, the satrap of Parthia, and ruled from 521 BCE to 486/485 BCE.
Assisted by six noble Persians, whose names he proclaims at the end of the Behistun inscription, he surprised and killed the usurper in a Median fortress (October 521; for the chronology of these times cf.
He called the high-priest of Sais, Uzahor, to Susa (as we learn from his inscription in the Vatican), and gave him full powers to reorganize the "house of life," the great medical school of the temple of Sais.
www.wikiran.org /w/index.php?title=Darius_the_Great   (1239 words)

  
 Behistun Inscription - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Behistun Inscription - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Behistun Inscription, cuneiform writing on the precipitous limestone rock situated in the Zagros mountains above the village of Behistun, in western...
No one guessed the meaning of the wedges when early travellers found cuneiform in some of the ruins that were discovered, especially the ruins of...
uk.encarta.msn.com /Behistun_Inscription.html   (103 words)

  
 Darius and the Bisutun Inscription
Darius’ Bisutun inscription has proven to be the ‘Rosetta Stone’; of the ancient near eastern languages, but with the distinction that, of the three languages inscribed therein, none had previously been deciphered by modern scholars.
These brief examples of the text of the Bisutun inscription (and the various copies that were distributed throughout the empire) demonstrate how the work assists in the reconstruction of the history of ancient Persia.
It is as a result of Darius, Rawlinson, and this inscription that we have come to understand cuneiform script and several of the historically significant languages that utilized it.
visopsys.org /andy/essays/darius-bisitun.html   (2212 words)

  
 Darius and the Bisutun Inscription
Darius’ Bisutun inscription has proven to be the ‘Rosetta Stone’; of the ancient near eastern languages, but with the distinction that, of the three languages inscribed therein, none had previously been deciphered by modern scholars.
These brief examples of the text of the Bisutun inscription (and the various copies that were distributed throughout the empire) demonstrate how the work assists in the reconstruction of the history of ancient Persia.
It is as a result of Darius, Rawlinson, and this inscription that we have come to understand cuneiform script and several of the historically significant languages that utilized it.
www.visopsys.org /andy/essays/darius-bisitun.html   (2212 words)

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