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Topic: Ben Jonson


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In the News (Fri 19 Apr 19)

  
  Ben Jonson
Ben Jonson - A biography of the Elizabethan dramatist.
Ben Jonson: Monologues - An index of monologues by Jonson.
Ben Jonson: Poems - An index of poems.
www.theatredatabase.com /17th_century/ben_jonson_001.html   (625 words)

  
  Ben Jonson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ben Jonson married some time before 1594, to a woman he described to Drummond as "a shrew, yet honest." His wife has not been decisively identified, but she is sometimes identified as the Ann Lewis who married a Benjamin Jonson at St Magnus-the-Martyr, near London Bridge.
Jonson quickly adapted himself to the additional demand for masques and entertainments introduced with the new reign and fostered by both the king and his consort, Anne of Denmark.
The principal factor in Jonson's partial eclipse was, however, the death of James and the accession of King Charles I in 1625.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ben_Jonson   (4108 words)

  
 The Life of Ben Jonson (1572-1637)
Jonson joined the theatrical company of Philip Henslowe in London as an actor and playwright on or before 1597, when he is identified in the papers of Henslowe.
Jonson became a celebrity, and there was a brief fashion for 'humours' comedy, a kind of topical comedy involving eccentric characters, each of whom represented a temperament, or humor, of humanity.
Jonson died on August 6, 1637 and was buried in Westminster Abbey under a plain slab on which was later carved the words, "O Rare Ben Jonson!" His admirers and friends contributed to the collection of memorial elegies, Jonsonus virbius, published in 1638.
www.luminarium.org /sevenlit/jonson/benbio.htm   (1191 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Ben Jonson
Ben Jonson's studied classicism fell out of favour in the nineteenth century with the advent of Romanticism, which saw in Shakespeare "the great poet of nature".
Ben Jonson further related that he was born a month after the death of his father, who, after suffering in estate and person under Queen Mary, had in the end turned minister.
But Jonson was no stranger to the tenderest of affections: two at least of the several children whom his wife bore to him he commemorated in touching little tributes of verse; nor in speaking of his lost eldest daughter did he forget her mothers tears.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Ben-Jonson   (619 words)

  
 Ben Jonson - LoveToKnow 1911   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Jonson's gratitude for an education to which in truth he owed an almost inestimable debt concentrated itself upon the " most reverend head " of his benefactor, then second and afterwards head master of the famous school, and the firm friend of his pupil in later life.
Jonson was afterwards a diligent student of divinity; but, though his mind was religious, it is not probable that its natural bias much inclined it to dwell upon creeds and their controversies.
Jonson was buried on the north side of the nave in Westminster Abbey, and the inscription, " 0 Rare Ben Jonson," was cut in the slab over his grave.
www.1911ency.org /J/JO/JONSON_BEN.htm   (5174 words)

  
 Ben Jonson   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ben Jonson was born in London in 1573.
Jonson plunged himself into the bohemian life of the city, drank alot, acted (badly), doctored Thomas Kyd's Spanish Tragedy for Phillip Henslowe, and adapted two Roman comedies in The Case Is Altered.
Jonson fell into a quarrel with the actor Gabriel Spencer and, in a duel, killed the man, though his blade was ten inches shorter than Spencer's.
www.longroad.ac.uk /accreditation/subject_english/jonson/authors_jonson.htm   (504 words)

  
 Ben Jonson. Eliot, T. S. 1920. The Sacred Wood
It is generally conceded that Jonson failed as a tragic dramatist; and it is usually agreed that he failed because his genius was for satiric comedy and because of the weight of pedantic learning with which he burdened his two tragic failures.
Jonson behaved as the great creative mind that he was: he created his own world, a world from which his followers, as well as the dramatists who were trying to do something wholly different, are excluded.
If we approach Jonson with less frozen awe of his learning, with a clearer understanding of his "rhetoric" and its applications, if we grasp the fact that the knowledge required of the reader is not archæology but knowledge of Jonson, we can derive not only instruction in non-Euclidean humanity—but enjoyment.
www.bartleby.com /200/sw10.html   (4475 words)

  
 Ben Jonson
Ben Jonson is generally cited as the principal witness for William Shakespeare, has now been called on behalf of Francis Bacon.
Would that Ben Jonson if he could arise from his square foot of earth in Westminster Abbey and tell us why his two greatest contemporaries never mentioned each other; for to him the answer was assuredly known.
Ben Jonson, after Shakespeare the most eminent writer for the Elizabethan stage, was born in 1573, and died in 1635.
www.sirbacon.org /links/jonson.html   (1292 words)

  
 HOASM: Ben Jonson
The plot is of Jonson's own invention, but from Chapman's An Humorous Day's Mirth (1599) he drew hints for the gull, and from Plautine comedy he derived the suggestion of a pair of elderly persons deceived and outwitted by a pair of clever, young men, is well as the shrewd serving-man and the braggart soldier.
Jonson's most popular and, in the light of his theory, most perfect play, The Alchemist, entered in the Stationers' Register October 3, 1610, and published in 1612, was written during the plague season of 1610 for performance before Londoners who, like Lovewit, would return to their homes after all danger of infection had passed.
Jonson's one extant attempt at pastoral drama, The Sad Shepherd, was found as a fragment among his papers after his death, and was published by Sir Kenelm Digby in the second folio with the date 1641 on its title-page.
www.hoasm.org /IVM/Jonson.html   (2019 words)

  
 The Academy of American Poets - Ben Jonson
Jonson was raised in Westminster and attended St. Martin's parish school and Westminster School, where he came under the influence of the classical scholar William Camden.
Jonson and Lewis had at least two children, but little else is known of their marriage.
Jonson was also friends with many of the writers of his day, and many of his most well-known poems include tributes to friends such as Shakespeare, John Donne, and Francis Bacon.
www.poets.org /poet.php/prmPID/294   (403 words)

  
 Ben Jonson
Jonson's gratitude for an education to which in truth he owed an almost inestimable debt concentrated itself upon the "most reverend head" of his benefactor, then second and afterwards head master of the famous school, and the firm friend of his pupil in later life.
Though Ben Jonson never altogether recognized the truth of the maxim that the dramatic art has properly speaking no didactic purpose, his long and laborious life was not wasted upon a barren endeavor.
Jonson was buried on the north side of the nave in Westminster Abbey, and the inscription, "O Rare Ben Jonson", was cut in the slab over his grave.
www.nndb.com /people/168/000025093   (4362 words)

  
 Ben Jonson: Biography
In his address to the reader Jonson says "a second pen" had a good share in the original version of the play, but, since Jonson rewrote the parts of his collaborator, neither these passages nor their original author can be identified, though Chapman has been suggested with some probability.
Jonson's most popular and, in the light of his theory, most perfect play, The Alchemist, entered in the Stationers' Register October 3, 1610, and published in 1612, was written during the plague season of 1610 for performance before Londoners who, like Lovewit, would return to their homes after all danger of infection had passed.
Jonson's one extant attempt at pastoral drama, The Sad Shepherd, was found as a fragment among his papers after his death, and was published by Sir Kenelm Digby in the second folio with the date 1641 on its title-page.
www.theatrehistory.com /british/jonson001.html   (2087 words)

  
 Revaluating Ben Jonson
The 1616 Folio was Jonson's most audacious piece of literary self-presentation, one that claimed classic status for his plays, masques and poems and presented them as parts of a unified corpus inspired by his high conception of the poet's calling.
Jonson is thus appropriated by the modern director, working from the standpoint of the high cultural, university-educated élite, in an attempt to preserve timeless literary values in the face of an unruly and threatening mass culture.
This analysis of Ben Jonson's reputation in performance, during the 1960s and 1970s, has revealed a similar preoccupation with modernist ideas; the 'original text' should be carefully studied and performed, according to Leavisian precepts, so that Jonson's 'greatness' as a writer can be communicated to theatre audiences (and especially dramatic critics).
members.tripod.com /%7Ewarlight/Lraw2.html   (4368 words)

  
 Ben Jonson
Perhaps in remembrance of his father, Jonson enlisted with the English supporters of the Protestant Hollanders who were defending their religious and political liberties against Catholicism and Spanish rule.
Jonson plunged himself into the bohemian life of the city, drank alot, acted (badly), doctored Thomas Kyd's Spanish Tragedy for Phillip Henslowe, and adapted two Roman comedies in The Case Is Altered.
Jonson fell into a quarrel with the actor Gabriel Spencer and, in a duel, killed the man, though his blade was ten inches shorter than Spencer's.
www.imagi-nation.com /moonstruck/clsc11.htm   (628 words)

  
 Ben Jonson
Jonson, like Shakespeare, came from modest beginnings--his father was a bricklayer--but he was a man of great learning, widely read in both the Greek and Latin classical authors.
Sidney would have approved of the way that he carefully adhered to the "unities" in his plays, and of the way that he was more conscious of the classical distinction between comedy and tragedy* than others in the period.
One of Jonson's major innovations was the "comedy of humours." A humour (as in Renaissance psychology) was a quality of mind or mood which dominated a particular character.
ise.uvic.ca /Library/SLT/drama/jonson.html   (217 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Benjamin Jonson (June 11, 1572 - August 6, 1637) was an English dramatist, poet and actor.
Jonson, in 1601, was employed by Henslowe to revise Thomas Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy - hackwork which suggests his financial difficulties during this period.
Jonson has been criticised for being inferior in poetic power to William Shakespeare, and lacking Shakespeare's gift for creating realistic characters.
wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/b/be/ben_jonson.html   (1322 words)

  
 BEN JONSON : Discoveries and some poems, by Ben Jonson
Ben Jonson was of a north-country family from the Annan district that produced Thomas Carlyle.
Ben Jonson was taught at the parish school of St. Martin' s till he was discovered by William Camden, the historian.
Ben Jonson' s genius was producing its best work in the earlier years of the reign of James I. His Volpone, the Silent Woman, and the Alchemist first appeared side by side with some of the ripest works of Shakespeare in the years from 1605 to 1610.
www.everypoet.com /archive/poetry/Ben_Jonson   (13917 words)

  
 Ben Jonson biography
Jonson, a Catholic, was forced to appear before the Privy Council to answer charges of "popery and treason".
Despite the evident and understandable mistrust of Jonson by the authorities, he was appointed court poet in 1605, and produced a number of highly successful court masques.
Ben Jonson died on August 6, 1637 and was buried under a plain slab in Westminster Abbey.
www.britainexpress.com /History/bio/jonson.htm   (368 words)

  
 In Search of Shakespeare . Ben Jonson | PBS
Spencer was killed and Jonson only spared execution by drawing on his knowledge of Latin to invoke the benefit of the clergy, which enabled the convicted criminal to pass as a clergyman, and therefore obtain a discharge from the civil courts.
Jonson's method of working began to crystallize about this time, and he began to produce more hard-edged, biting satire dispensing with a lot of the farce and frippery that were Shakespeare's tools.
Jonson would find himself in trouble with the State time and time again – for ridiculing the Scots in "Eastward Ho!" and most seriously when he was questioned over the gunpowder plot, after which he renounced his "provocative" Roman Catholicism.
www.pbs.org /shakespeare/players/player30.html   (909 words)

  
 Ben Jonson and Cervantes*
Jonson would not have missed this trait either, for it was also his life-long principle "to diminish the authoritie and acceptance" that nonconformists to the classical canon had "in the world, and among the vulgar".
From his time till the mid-eighteenth century, Jonson was at the pinnacle of literary reputation, for raising the still "underdeveloped" English language and literature to vie with "insolent Greece or haughty Rome".
As shown later, Jonson left signs of the novel's strong influence on him, expressly after 1612; the romantic elements in his last plays are better understood as a variation on the burlesque of chivalric romances.
www.uv.es /~fores/YamadaYumiko.uk.html   (3765 words)

  
 Poetry: Ben Jonson   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Jonson was imprisoned in Elizabeth's reign for writing an offensive play, the Isle of Dogs (1597), and in the early years of King James's reign, which began on March 24, 1603, play writing continued to be dangerous.
Jonson and Chapman were imprisoned, but Jonson eventually contacted enough important people to secure his release, probably in October, claiming that the few offensive lines had been written by Marston, who had fled London to avoid prison.
Jonson won considerable acclaim as a writer in the court of James I and Queen Anne.
www.bedfordstmartins.com /litlinks/poetry/jonson.htm   (699 words)

  
 Ben Jonson Biography and Summary
By turns turbulent and weighty, scatalogical and refined, boisterous and delicate, Ben Jonson's works have always excited strong reactions among his readers and his playgoing audiences, just as his personality strongly impressed or offended his contempor...
Although Ben Jonson is still best known as a dramatist, his significance as a poet is hard to overestimate.
Benjamin Jonson (circa June 11, 1572 – August 6, 1637) was an English Renaissance dramatist, poet and actor.
www.bookrags.com /Ben_Jonson   (400 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Ben Jonson (English Literature, 1500 To 1799, Biography) - Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Jonson became a favorite of James I and wrote many excellent masques for the court.
Jonson's plays, written along classical lines, are marked by a pungent and uncompromising satire, by a liveliness of action, and by numerous humor characters, whose single passion or oddity overshadows all their other traits.
Although arrogant and contentious, he was a boon companion, and his followers, sometimes called the "sons of Ben," loved to gather with him in the London taverns.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/J/Jonson-B.html   (624 words)

  
 Ben Jonson
The Works of Ben Jonson: Includes links to extensive selections from the poetry and prose, as well as to most of the plays and masques.
Jonson and Alchemy: A brief sketch of the place of alchemists and alchemical knowledge in The Alchemist.
Ben Jonson, Masque of Blackness and Masque of Oberon: A slide show of costumes, set designs, etc. from two of Jonson's masques.
english.edgewood.edu /eng359/ben_jonson.htm   (401 words)

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