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Topic: Betty Friedan


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In the News (Thu 18 Oct 18)

  
  First Measured Century: Interview: Betty Friedan
Betty Friedan is the Founder of the National Organization for Women, the National Women’s Caucus, and the National Abortion Rights Action League.
BETTY FRIEDAN: I was born and grew up in Peoria, Illinois, which you might say is the middle of the middle of America, what used to be a synonym almost: "hick," "hayseed" or "will it play in Peoria".
BETTY FRIEDAN: When the children were little, we lived in a wonderful garden apartment community that actually had been built for the U.N. But they didn't need all the apartments for the U.N. so you could be eligible for that.
www.pbs.org /fmc/interviews/friedan.htm   (3709 words)

  
 Blog of Death: Betty Friedan
Betty Naomi Goldstein Friedan commended women who chose to become wives and mothers, but she also believed that domesticity shouldn't be the only path available to the female sex.
After marrying and having children of her own, Friedan published her thoughts on the subject, and the result was a feminist manifesto that inspired generations of women to seek separate identities and equal rights in society.
Friedan's father, Harry Goldstein, also promoted the belief that "a woman's place was in the home." He once caught a young Betty walking with an armload of books she'd checked out from the library, and told her it was unladylike for a girl to read so much.
www.blogofdeath.com /archives/001540.html   (915 words)

  
 Obituary: Betty Friedan | Obituaries | Guardian Unlimited Books
Friedan was initially appalled, but her strategic caution was overborne in the extraordinary growth of the women's-liberation movement.
Friedan had had a series of disputes with members of Now, but she remained the visible symbol of liberal feminism while, across the political spectrum, Phyllis Schlafly focused the ire of women of the new right on Friedan's claim to speak for American women.
Friedan had lost that old news-media touch and got stuck in the publicity package she had created in the 1960s and 1970s of that girl from Peoria, Illinois, who had lived the feminine mystique as a suburban mum.
books.guardian.co.uk /obituaries/story/0,,1702965,00.html   (1878 words)

  
 Betty Friedan at Cornell
Betty Friedan, the outspoken advocate for women's rights who died Feb. 3 in her Washington, D.C., home, was a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Institute for Women and Work at Cornell University's School of Industrial and Labor Relations from 1998 until her death at the age of 85.
At the school's Institute for Women and Work, Friedan was director of "New Paradigm: Women, Men, Work, Family and Public Policy." In that role she developed a series of seminars and symposiums on critical workplace issues, in Washington, D.C., New York City and Bellagio, Italy, with support from a $1 million Ford Foundation grant.
Friedan also was a guest lecturer in the course "The New Paradigm: The Changing American Workplace and Family Life," which she co-taught with Moccio at the ILR School's Cornell in Washington program.
www.news.cornell.edu /stories/Feb06/Friedan.obit.lbm.html   (446 words)

  
 ABC News: Feminist Author Betty Friedan Dies at 85   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Betty Friedan, whose manifesto "The Feminine Mystique" became a best seller in the 1960s and laid the groundwork for the modern feminist movement, died Saturday, her birthday.
Friedan's assertion in her 1963 best seller that having a husband and babies was not everything and that women should aspire to separate identities as individuals, was highly unusual, if not revolutionary, just after the baby and suburban booms of the Eisenhower era.
But at the same time, Friedan insisted that the women's movement had to remain in the American mainstream, that men had to be accepted as allies and that the family should not be rejected.
abcnews.go.com /US/wireStory?id=1580437   (454 words)

  
 AWM Book Review: Betty Friedan
In The Feminine Mystique, Betty Friedan wrote from the point of view of the white, American, middle-class suburban housewife of the 1950s, brainwashed by the culture into the belief that a woman's greatest fulfillment can be found in caring for home, husband, and children.
Friedan's passionate book was a call to arms for the women's liberation movement of the sixties, and found a wide audience, not only in the United States but in many other Western countries as well.
Friedan was born in Peoria, Illinois in 1921.
www.awm-math.org /bookreviews/SepOct99.html   (1519 words)

  
 Betty Friedan, Who Ignited Cause in 'Feminine Mystique,' Dies at 85 - New York Times   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Betty Friedan, the feminist crusader and author whose searing first book, "The Feminine Mystique," ignited the contemporary women's movement in 1963 and as a result permanently transformed the social fabric of the United States and countries around the world, died yesterday, her 85th birthday, at her home in Washington.
Friedan's work as outmoded, a great many aspects of modern life that seem routine today — from unisex Help Wanted ads to women in politics, medicine, the clergy and the military — are the direct result of the hard-won advances she helped women attain.
Friedan identifies, dissects and damningly indicts one of the most pervasive folk beliefs of postwar American life: the myth of suburban women's domestic fulfillment she came to call the feminine mystique.
www.nytimes.com /2006/02/05/national/05friedan.html?ex=1296795600&en=30472e5004a66ea3&ei=5090   (904 words)

  
 Betty Friedan 
Bettye Naomi Goldstein was born on February 4, 1921, in Peoria, Illinois.
Betty received her bachelor’s degree in 1942—by that time she had dropped the final “e”—and accepted a fellowship to the University of California, Berkeley, for graduate work in psychology.
The new society Friedan proposed, founded on the notion that men and women were created equal, represented such a drastic upending of prevailing norms that over the years, she would be forced to explain her position again and again.
www.zmag.org /ZMagSite/Mar2006/friedan0306.html   (708 words)

  
 ABC News: Feminism Pioneer Betty Friedan Dies at 85   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Betty Friedan, Author of Manifesto That Laid the Groundwork for Modern Feminism, Dies at 85
Friedan, whose manifesto "The Feminine Mystique" became a best seller in the 1960s and laid the groundwork for the modern feminist movement, died Saturday, Feb. 4, 2006, her birthday.
Friedan, she said, "was a giant for women's rights and a leading catalyst of the 20th century whose work led to profound changes improving the status of women and women's lives" worldwide.
abcnews.go.com /US/wireStory?id=1581918   (518 words)

  
 Betty Friedan, feminist, dies at 85 / Writings in 'Feminine Mystique' had global impact still felt today
Betty Friedan, the feminist crusader and author whose searing first book, "The Feminine Mystique," ignited the contemporary women's movement in 1963 and in so doing permanently transformed the social fabric of the United States and countries around the world, died Saturday, her 85th birthday, at her home in Washington.
Betty Goldstein received her bachelor's degree in 1942 -- by that time she had dropped the final "e," which she considered an affectation of her mother's -- and accepted a fellowship to UC Berkeley for graduate work in psychology.
The new society Friedan proposed, founded on the notion that men and women were created equal, represented such a drastic upending of the prevailing social norms that over the years to come, she would be forced to explain her position again and again.
www.sfgate.com /cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/02/05/MNGQJH32DT1.DTL   (1241 words)

  
 "Betty Friedan, Feminism, and Jewish Identity", from Joyce Antler, The Journey Home: How Jewish Women Shaped Modern ...
Friedan confessed to having always had "very strong feelings" about her Jewish identity; it is not unlikely that this Orthodox prayer, emblematic of gender differences in Jewish religious roles, now emerged from the recesses of Friedan's memory.
Friedan used the language of the Holocaust not merely as a metaphor, or as a tactic to shock readers, but because of the link she had already made between the oppression of women and that of Jews.
Upon graduating, Friedan came home to speak at Peoria's Reform Synagogue on "Affirming One's Jewishness"—turning anti-Semitism "against oneself instead of affirming one's identity." The talk was "strong meat" for the community but one which helped her come to terms which the anti-Semitism which she believed had been the "dominant menace" of her childhood.
www.jwa.org /discover/inmemoriam/friedan/antler   (2746 words)

  
 Betty Friedan Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
Betty Friedan (born 1921) is a women's rights activist, author of The Feminine Mystique, and a founding member of the National Organization for Women, the National Abortion Rights Action League, and the National Women's Political Caucus.
Friedan was herself well situated to know the effects of the "feminine mystique." She was born Betty Naomi Goldstein February 4, 1921 in Peoria, Illinois, the daughter of Jewish parents.
Friedan wrote an article based on her findings, but the editors of the women's magazines with whom she had previously worked refused to publish the piece.
www.bookrags.com /biography/betty-friedan   (1354 words)

  
 Betty Friedan 
Bettye Naomi Goldstein was born on February 4, 1921, in Peoria, Illinois.
Betty received her bachelor’s degree in 1942—by that time she had dropped the final “e”—and accepted a fellowship to the University of California, Berkeley, for graduate work in psychology.
The new society Friedan proposed, founded on the notion that men and women were created equal, represented such a drastic upending of prevailing norms that over the years, she would be forced to explain her position again and again.
zmagsite.zmag.org /Mar2006/friedan0306.html   (708 words)

  
 In Memory of Betty Friedan
Betty Friedan died on February 4, 2006 of congestive heart failure on her 85th birthday at home in Washington, DC.
Betty Friedan was one of the founders of the National Organization for Women (NOW) and a leader in the women's movement.
Betty Friedan was born Bettye Naomi Goldstein in Peoria, Illinois in 1921.
nedv.net /village/in_memory/bettyfriedan.php   (628 words)

  
 [No title]
Friedan was a housewife and mother who also worked as a journalist for the Communist-controlled United Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers of America (IUE) union, which was, "the largest Communist-led institution of any kind in the United States," according to historian Ronald Schatz.
Friedan served as the group's president until she resigned in March 1970.
Betty Friedan died of congestive heart failure on February 4, 2006, her 85th birthday.
www.discoverthenetwork.org /individualProfile.asp?indid=1328   (523 words)

  
 Leading American Feminist Betty Friedan Dies at 85
Betty Friedan was the author of a pioneering and controversial 1963 book, called "The Feminine Mystique", which rejected the notion that a woman's worth should be measured only by her success as wife and mother.
Betty Friedan attributed many of these changes to the efforts of feminists like herself, who spent decades fighting gender stereotypes, and struggling for laws that would end sex discrimination.
Betty Friedan's survivors include three children and nine grandchildren, living proof of her contention that women can have a profound impact on society without foregoing motherhood.
www.voanews.com /english/2006-02-05-voa24.cfm   (702 words)

  
 Betty Friedan dies at 85
Betty Friedan, the writer, thinker and activist who almost single-handedly revived feminism with her 1963 book "The Feminine Mystique," died of congestive heart failure Saturday, her 85th birthday, at her home in Washington.
Friedan pushed for equal pay, sex-neutral help wanted ads, maternity leave, child care centers for working parents, legal abortion and many other topics considered radical in the 1960s and 1970s.
Friedan's was a voice that was loud, insistent and sometimes divisive.
www.statesman.com /news/content/news/stories/nation/02/5friedan.html   (638 words)

  
 NPR : Feminist Pioneer Betty Friedan Dies at 85
Friedan's assertion in her 1963 best seller that having a husband and babies was not everything and that women should aspire to separate identities as individuals, was highly unusual, if not revolutionary, just after the baby and suburban booms of the Eisenhower era.
But at the same time, Friedan insisted that the women's movement had to remain in the American mainstream, that men had to be accepted as allies and that the family should not be rejected.
Friedan got a maternity leave to have her first child in 1949, but was fired and replaced by a man when she asked for another leave to have the second child five years later.
www.npr.org /templates/story/story.php?storyId=5189956&ft=1&f=1001   (1050 words)

  
 Feminist pushed 'second women's movement into gear' - USATODAY.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
When Friedan died Feb. 4 on her 85th birthday of congestive heart failure, activists credited her with stirring women to find fulfillment beyond husband and children by pursuing careers not limited to traditional choices of nursing, teaching and secretarial work.
Friedan was born Bettye Goldstein in Peoria, Ill. She said her mother gave up a newspaper job and became a housewife when her daughter was born but felt frustrated and found gratification later when she took over the family jewelry store after her husband became ill.
Friedan said that the women's movement should stay in the American mainstream and that men should be accepted as allies.
www.usatoday.com /news/nation/2006-12-26-passages-friedan_x.htm   (623 words)

  
 Feminist author Betty Friedan dies at 85
Feb. 4, 2006 3:22 PM WASHINGTON - Betty Friedan, whose manifesto "The Feminine Mystique" became a best seller in the 1960s and laid the groundwork for the modern feminist movement, died Saturday, her birthday.
In "The Second Stage," Friedan also appeared to accept criticism from some women that "The Feminine Mystique" was too dismissive of domestic life.
She helped persuade the Democratic Party to give women half the delegate strength at its nominating convention and was herself a delegate when Geraldine Ferraro was nominated for vice president in 1984.
www.azcentral.com /ent/celeb/articles/0204betty.html   (1197 words)

  
 Betty Friedan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Friedan was born Bettye Naomi Goldstein on February 4, 1921 in Peoria, Illinois.
Betty Friedan "changed the course of human history almost single-handedly." Her ex-husband, Carl Friedan, believes this; Betty believed it too.
The problem Friedan identifies is as real now as it was years ago: "how to live the equality we fought for," and continue to fight for, with "the family as new feminist frontier." She writes not only for women's liberation but for human liberation.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Betty_Friedan   (1795 words)

  
 Feminist icon Betty Friedan dies on her birthday - World - theage.com.au
Friedan, who died on Saturday, connected with women's deep frustration at being confined to the roles of wife and mother, which she described as "the problem that has no name".
When people asked Friedan why she started the women's movement, she replied that she could not remember any early instance of sexual discrimination, but she was very aware of the waste of her mother's talents.
Friedan became aware of discrimination when she was refused entry to a high school sorority because she was a Jew.
www.theage.com.au /news/world/feminist-icon-betty-friedan-dies-on-her-birthday/2006/02/05/1139074106712.html   (747 words)

  
 Betty Friedan and the Radical Past of Liberal Feminism
Friedan's liberal or bourgeois theoretical perspective has also been seen to inform the liberal politics which she espoused as the first head of the National Organization for Women (NOW) with its focus on attaining economic and civic equality and its avoidance of the more contentious territory of sexual politics.
Indeed, Friedan is notorious for her initial vociferous opposition to the introduction of lesbianism in particular and sexuality in general as legitimate topics of political discussion in NOW (a position she later renounced).
Friedan's image as the paradigmatic liberal feminist was only reinforced with the publication of The Second Stage (1981) in which she systematically pointed out the dangers of what she deemed the excesses of the women's movement.
www.wpunj.edu /~newpol/issue35/boucher35.htm   (5812 words)

  
 Tributes to Betty Friedan
Betty Friedan's death (and recently Coretta Scott King's, and Rosa Parks') is a great loss to all women, yet we must be sure to keep her memory and the memory of the community-based movement that she launched alive.
I believe Betty Friedan was one of our greatest pioneers and I honor her life and am so grateful for her courageous spirit that I know will continue to touch the lives of many women.
Friedan's beliefs and I quote "It seemed to me that men weren't really the enemy — they were fellow victims, suffering from an outmoded masculine mystique that made them feel unnecessarily inadequate." I tell my students that feminism benefits everyone and allows people to be fully human.
www.now.org /history/friedan-tribute-compilation.html   (10127 words)

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