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Topic: Bidoon


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  In Kuwait, what are the Bidoon people? | Answerbag.com
Bidoon (meaning "without") is a term used in Kuwait to refer to residents of the country who do not hold citizenship.
Bidoon may be refugees who have illegally entered a Kuwait to avoid poverty or war, or those who have settled there since 1920 but who have not been recognised by the state.
Bidoon is not the same as Bedouin btw, a term generally applied to Arab nomadic groups, who are found throughout most of the desert belt extending from the Atlantic coast of the Sahara via the Western Desert, Sinai, and Negev to the eastern coast of the Arabian desert.
www.answerbag.com /q_view/14434   (431 words)

  
 Refugees International: Publications: Stateless Report
The Bidoon, a group of approximately 9,000-15,000 stateless persons, were granted citizenship during 2001, leaving some 1,300 still stateless.
Children born to mothers who are widows or divorcees of Bidoon men, are not accorded citizenship.
Bidoon children may be denied birth certificates needed to attend school.
www.refugeesinternational.org /section/publications/stateless_mideast   (1511 words)

  
  Kuwait
The bidoon, a term meaning "without," are Arabs who have residency ties to Kuwait--some going back for generations, some for briefer periods--but who have no documention of their nationality.
It maintains that many bidoon are concealing their true nationalities in order to remain in the country, become citizens, and enjoy the generous benefits provided to citizens.
However, the bidoon have problems obtaining visas to travel abroad on these passports, as they are easily detected as fraudulent, and they may have difficulty renewing these passports when they expire.
www.state.gov /g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2000/nea/796.htm   (11861 words)

  
  Kuwait Human Rights
Bidoon residents who were able to obtain travel documents surrendered these documents on their return to the country from abroad.
The bidoon are people who have residency ties to the country, some persisting for generations and others for briefer periods, but who either lack or conceal documentation of their true nationality.
According to this law, bidoon who were able to prove sufficient ties to the country (that is, their presence, or the presence of their forebears, in the country prior to 1965) were eligible to apply for citizenship directly.
www.multied.com /NationbyNation/Kuwait/Human.html   (14288 words)

  
  The Ultimate Bidoon - American History Information Guide and Reference   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Bidoon may be refugees who have illegally entered a Kuwait to avoid poverty or war, or those who have settled there since 1920 but who have not been recognised by the state.
The children of bidoon fathers are themselves considered bidoon.
In May 2000 up to 36,000 bidoon who had been resident in Kuwait since 1965 were granted citizenship, and 2001 the same rights were extended to bidoon husbands of Kuwaiti women.
www.historymania.com /american_history/Bidoon   (213 words)

  
 Refugee Voices: Stateless Bidoon
In the United Arab Emirates, the Bidoon (or persons without nationality) are represented by two major groups, Arabs (from neighboring countries) and non-Arabs (mainly from Iran and the Indian Sub-Continent) whose families settled in the Gulf generations ago as merchants or workers.
Exact numbers of the Bidoon are not generally known, but they have been unofficially estimated at about 100,000.
The Bidoon have limited access to medical care and education, and without passports and other basic identity documents, are restricted in their movement both within the country and internationally.
www.shuhood.org /news/149/ARTICLE/1201/2006-12-16.html   (376 words)

  
 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2001 - Kuwait   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The bidoon (a term meaning "without") are Arabs who have residency ties to Kuwait--some going back for generations, some for briefer periods--but who have no documentation of their nationality.
The law provides that bidoon who are able to prove sufficient ties to the country (that is, their presence, or the presence of their forebears, in the country prior to 1965) are eligible to apply for citizenship directly.
However, an additional 6,900 bidoon in 3 categories--wives of citizens, sons of Kuwaiti women married to bidoon, and those whose male relatives are citizens--have been permitted to apply for citizenship beyond the 2,000 per year limit.
www.usemb.se /human/2001/neareast/kuwait.html   (14529 words)

  
 Middle East Online
Like tens of thousands of stateless Arabs known as "bidoon", which means "without" in Arabic, the middle-aged widow and her teenage son remain deprived of many basic rights including health services, education and even obtaining a driver's licence.
In 2000, authorities turned up the heat by giving bidoons an ultimatum to either reveal their identity and obtain a normal residence permit like other foreigners or be deprived of many essential rights.
Now, most of the bidoon, whose number ranges between 70,000 according to a government count and 100,000 according to rights activists, have no right to work, obtain a birth certificate for their babies or even get their marriage certificate attested.
www.middle-east-online.com /english/features/Default.pl?id=18169   (721 words)

  
 Kuwait
The bidoon (a term meaning "without") are Arabs who have residency ties to the country--some going back for generations, some for briefer periods--but who have no documentation of their nationality.
The law provided that bidoon who were able to prove sufficient ties to the country (that is, their presence, or the presence of their forebears, in the country prior to 1965) were eligible to apply for citizenship directly.
However, an additional 5,500 bidoon in 3 categories--wives of citizens, sons of female citizens married to bidoon, and those whose male relatives are citizens--have been permitted to apply for citizenship beyond the 2,000 per year limit.
www.fas.org /asmp/profiles/kuwait/kuwait-hr-02.htm   (13086 words)

  
 Kuwait Human Rights
The bidoon (a term meaning "without") are Arabs who have residency ties to the country--some going back for generations, some for briefer periods--but who have no documentation of their nationality.
In 1993 the Government decreed that bidoon males no longer would be allowed to serve in the military; however, in July 2001, the Minister of Defense suspended action to force bidoon to resign from the Army.
However, an additional 5,500 bidoon in 3 categories--wives of citizens, sons of female citizens married to bidoon, and those whose male relatives are citizens--have been permitted to apply for citizenship beyond the 2,000 per year limit.
www.nationbynation.com /Kuwait/Human.html   (13126 words)

  
 Kuwait
The bidoon (an Arabic term meaning "without" as in "without citizenship") are Arabs who have residency ties to the country, some persisting for generations and some for briefer periods, but who either lack or have failed to produce documentation of their nationality.
According to this law, bidoon who were able to prove sufficient ties to the country (that is, their presence, or the presence of their forebears, in the country prior to 1965) were eligible to apply for citizenship directly.
However, an additional 5,500 bidoon in 3 categories, wives of citizens, sons of female citizens married to bidoon, and those whose male relatives are citizens, have been permitted to apply for citizenship beyond the 2,000 per year limit.
state.gov /g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2004/41725.htm   (15635 words)

  
 Operation Kuwaiti Freedom | The Fight For Freedom is On...
The discretionary citizenship process has not been open to challenge since three decade, many Bidoon were denied citizenship simply due to the fact that the government failed to act on their applications or provide them with an adequate opportunity to prove their claims.
By the end of 1997, however, the government had naturalized only about 500 Bidoon, many the children of Kuwaiti citizen mothers", this is another proof that the Kuwaiti government is not serious to solve the Bidoon crisis, and since the sixties the government had been promising to solve this crisis, but never done so.
The situation of the Bidoon in general are aggravating every day, they had been deprived from the majority of their basic human and civil rights starting from the 1980's.
www.freewebs.com /kuwaitfreedom   (677 words)

  
 Refugees International: Articles: Refugee Voices: Stateless Bidoon
In the United Arab Emirates, the Bidoon (or persons without nationality) are represented by two major groups, Arabs (from neighboring countries) and non-Arabs (mainly from Iran and the Indian Sub-Continent) whose families settled in the Gulf generations ago as merchants or workers.
The Bidoon have limited access to medical care and education, and without passports and other basic identity documents, are restricted in their movement both within the country and internationally.
The struggles of the Bidoon are not limited to employment and travel.
www.refugeesinternational.org /content/article/detail/5076   (401 words)

  
 Thousands of stateless in Kuwait cry for mercy -- Middle East Times
Like tens of thousands of stateless Arabs known as bidoon, which means "without" in Arabic, the middle-aged widow and her teenage son remain deprived of many basic rights including health services, education, and even obtaining a driver's license.
In 2000, authorities turned up the heat by giving bidoons an ultimatum to either reveal their identity and obtain a normal residence permit like other foreigners or be deprived of many essential rights.
Now most of the bidoon, whose number ranges between 70,000 according to a government count and 100,000 according to rights activists, have no right to work, obtain a birth certificate for their babies, or even get their marriage certificate attested.
www.metimes.com /print.php?StoryID=20061107-045500-1230r   (686 words)

  
 Al Jazeera English - Archive - Kuwait Mp: Rights For Stateless Arabs
The government launched a crackdown on bidoons in 2000, depriving them of their essential rights, and their legal status remains unresolved.
The bidoon, Arabic for without, are Arabs who have residency ties to the country, some going back generations, but who either lack or have failed to produce documentation of their nationality.
The number of bidoon dwindled from about 250,000 before the Iraqi invasion in August 1990 to about 120,000 after Kuwait's liberation seven months later as most of them fled to Iraq.
english.aljazeera.net /English/archive/archive?ArchiveId=4739   (349 words)

  
 Middle East Online
Kuwait launched a crackdown on stateless Arabs, known as bidoon, in 2000, depriving them of their essential rights in a bid to force them to reveal their true identity.
The government insists that a majority of bidoon, whose current number is estimated at more than 70,000, came from neighbouring countries after the discovery of oil in the 1930s.
Authorities said that during the past six years, some 20,000 bidoon produced their original citizenship and were given residence permits like other foreigners.
www.middle-east-online.com /English/kuwait/?id=16319   (362 words)

  
 Report on Human Rights Practices for 2001 Kuwait
However, an additional 6,900 bidoon in 3 categories--wives of citizens, sons of Kuwaiti women married to bidoon, and those whose male relatives are citizens--have been permitted to apply for citizenship beyond the 2,000 per year limit.
However, bidoon have difficulty obtaining visas to travel abroad on these passports, as they easily are detected as fraudulent, and they may have difficulty renewing these passports when they expire.
Under the law, bidoon who admit to another nationality (or who purchase a passport from a country to which they have no true connection) do not automatically forfeit their claim to citizenship based on Kuwaiti residency prior to 1965.
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org /jsource/anti-semitism/hrkuwait01.html   (14503 words)

  
 Kuwaiti Bidoun - منتدى الكويتيين البدون   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The discretionary citizenship process has not been open to challenge since three decade, many Bidoon were denied citizenship simply due to the fact that the government failed to act on their applications or provide them with an adequate opportunity to prove their claims.
Till this moment all Bidoon that are naturalized are only the children of widow Kuwait mothers with first degree citizenship not second, and many of them are not Bidoon some hold other nationality.
The situation of the Bidoon in general are aggravating every day, they had been deprived from the majority of their basic human and civil rights starting from the 1980's.
www.kuwaitibedoons.com /vb/showthread.php?p=2684   (1125 words)

  
 Kuwait
The bidoon (an Arabic term meaning "without" as in "without citizenship") are Arabs who have residency ties to the country, some persisting for generations and some for briefer periods, but who either lack or have failed to produce documentation of their nationality.
Although the Government eliminated the bidoon from the census rolls and discontinued their access to most government jobs, some bidoon work in the armed forces and are now being accepted in the institutions of the Public Authority for Applied Education and Training.
However, an additional 5,500 bidoon in 3 categories, wives of citizens, sons of female citizens married to bidoon, and those whose male relatives are citizens, have been permitted to apply for citizenship beyond the 2,000 per year limit.
www.law.yale.edu /rcw/rcw/jurisdictions/asw/kuwait/Kuwait_human_rights_rep.htm   (11745 words)

  
 [Islam-Online- Top News]
"Bidoons are humiliated by the officials in the Interior Ministry.
Some bidoon are from families based without official status in Kuwait for several generations, while others are mostly Arab economic migrants attracted by the oil boom of the 1950s.
The Kuwaiti government has long claimed that many bidoon, who can only work unofficially, are hiding their original nationality in a bid to obtain citizenship to enjoy the state's generous cradle-to-grave welfare system.
www.islamonline.net /IOL-English/dowalia/news-2000-May-17/topnews5.asp   (426 words)

  
 Gulfnews: Print Friendly Version   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Human rights activists have even claimed that the CCIA has forced some bidoon to claim that they are from other countries in order to "correct" their status.
Among the bidoon 2,088 women are married to Kuwaiti men, and 2,674 men are married to Kuwaiti women.
Kuwait's government has spent KD7.5 million ($21 million) on education for bidoon and 724 bidoon families are on the dole, while 4,866 housing units have been provided for bidoon families, in addition to another two million dinars spent on housing allowances for bidoon.
archive.gulfnews.com /articles/print_friendly_version.jsp?global_name=/channels/gulfnews_com/articles/04/04/30/119642.html   (902 words)

  
 United Nations Human Rights Website - Treaty Bodies Database - Document - Summary Record - Kuwait
The situation of the bidoon (stateless persons) residing in Kuwait was said to be a primary concern of the authorities (paras.
Because of of the bidoon's largely nomadic characteristics, they came within article 25 (d) of a previous version of the Nationality Law which exempted nomads from the need for entry visas and residence permits, allowing them to enter and leave the country at will.
After 1959, bidoon were issued with temporary special travel documents, and were eligible for employment and government services such as health, education and welfare.
www.unhchr.ch /TBS/doc.nsf/e121f32fbc58faafc1256a2a0027ba24/1fae9818c5381a0a8025673e00390939?OpenDocument   (5254 words)

  
 openDemocracy
The fate of the bidoon or stateless people, who have often lived in Kuwait for generations but are nonetheless denied political rights, is a prime example of such dilemmas.
Some bidoon come from ancient Bedouin tribes while others were drawn to Kuwait during the oil-boom of the 1950s.
bidoon into political life results from the same conservative forces which still deny women the right to vote.
www.mafhoum.com /press5/139S22.htm   (1240 words)

  
 1995 Human Rights Report: KUWAIT
Domestic servants are not protected by the labor law, and unskilled foreign workers suffer from a lack of a minimum wage in the private sector, and from failures to enforce the labor law.
The Government argues that many Bidoon (the term means "without") are concealing their true citizenship in order to remain in Kuwait, become citizens, and enjoy the generous benefits provided to citizens.
The Government has established a review process which would regularize the status of some of the Bidoon and their families, especially for any Bidoon who has served in the Kuwaiti military and security forces and for the children born to marriages between Bidoon males and Kuwaiti women.
dosfan.lib.uic.edu /ERC/democracy/1995_hrp_report/95hrp_report_nea/Kuwait.html   (6260 words)

  
 USCRI
Bidoon During 2003, Kuwait made limited progress in addressing the long-standing issue of the stateless Bidoon.
The government relaxed the 2,000-person annual cap to permit 5,500 Bidoon from three special categories (sons of female citizens married to Bidoon, those whose male relatives are citizens, and wives of citizens) to apply for citizenship.
The Ministry of Defense also approved citizenship for some 400 Bidoon who fought against Iraq during the 1991 invasion of Kuwait, shelving another proposal to naturalize posthumously those whose remains had been identified.
www.refugees.org /countryreports.aspx?area=investigate&subm=19&ssm=29&cid=127   (335 words)

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