Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Bilabial consonant


Related Topics

In the News (Mon 17 Sep 18)

  
  Encyclopedia: Bilabial consonant
Alveolars are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue against the alveolar ridge, the internal side of the upper gums (known as the alveoles of the upper teeth).
Postalveolar (or palato-alveolar) consonants are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue between the alveolar ridge (the place of articulation for alveolar consonants) and the palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants).
Glottal consonants are consonants articulated with the glottis.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Bilabial-consonant   (1205 words)

  
 Dorsal consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Dorsal consonants are articulated with the back of the tongue against either the hard palate, or the flexible velum just behind it, or even against the uvula.
The English pronunciation of the letter C — either before the vowels a, o and u, or before the letters l and r — is a dorsal consonant.
This consonant is also the pronunciation of the English letters k and q.
www.peekskill.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Dorsal_consonant   (250 words)

  
 ipswebhome
For instance, the first consonant in the English word keen is an advanced velar and is produced with a closure towards the front of the velum.
Consonant: Sounds made with a relatively close constriction or complete closure in the vocal tract and which occur singly or in clusters at the edges of syllables.
Ejective consonants are produced with an egressive glottalic airstream and implosives with an ingressive one.
www.phon.ucl.ac.uk /home/johnm/ips/ipsweb_glossary.htm   (5447 words)

  
 Dental consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Dentals are consonants such as t, d, n, and l articulated with either the lower or the upper teeth, or both, rather than with the gum ridge as in English.
Thus a good phonetic description of a language will specify whether coronal consonants are laminal or apical as well as whether they are dental or alveolar.
The dental consonants as transcribed by the International Phonetic Alphabet are:
www.kernersville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Dental_consonant   (377 words)

  
 Labial consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
English [m] is a bilabial nasal sonorant, [b] and [p] are bilabial stops (plosives), [v] and [f] are labiodental fricatives.
Bilabial fricatives and the bilabial approximant do not exist in standard English, but do occur in many languages.
For example, the Spanish consonant spelt b or v is pronounced as a voiced bilabial approximant between vowels.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Labial_consonant   (136 words)

  
 Labial consonant
Labials are consonants articulated with both lips (bilabial articulation) or with the lower lip and the upper teeth (labiodental articulation).
English [m] is a bilabial nasal; [p] and [b] are bilabial stops; [f] and [v] are labiodental fricatives.
Bilabial fricatives are less common but do occur in many languages; for example, the Spanish consonant spelt b or v is pronounced as a voiced bilabial fricative [B] between vowels.
www.wordlookup.net /la/labial-consonant.html   (250 words)

  
 Ilya Writing
In the cases of vowel pairs the first vowel is a spread vowel, where the corners of the mouth are held far apart, and the second is a rounded vowel, where the lips are held in an "o" shape.
With consonant pairs, the first is unvoiced (no vocal cord vibration), the second is voiced, said exactly the same way, but with the vocal cords vibrating.
Bilabial Consonant, where the sound is produced by the motion of the lips.
homepage.mac.com /pfhreak/ilya/writing/letters.html   (548 words)

  
 Language School Explorer - Information about Palatal_consonant
Palatal consonants are consonants articulated with the body of the tongue raised against the hard palate (the middle part of the roof of the mouth).
Consonants with the tip of the tongue curled back against the palate are called retroflex.
Consonants with other primary articulations may be palatalised, that is, accompanied by the raising of the tongue surface towards the hard palate.
www.school-explorer.com /info/Palatal_consonant   (166 words)

  
 Postalveolar consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Postalveolar consonants are consonants articulated with the tongue between the alveolar ridge (the place of articulation for alveolar consonants) and the palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants).
The alveolo-palatal and retroflex consonants are also postalveolar in their point of articulation, but they are given separate columns in the IPA chart.
The difference between palato-alveolar, alveolo-palatal, and retroflex is in the shape of the tongue rather than the place of articulation: in palato-alveolars, like English sh, the tongue is bunched-up ("domed"); in alveolo-palatals, like Mandarin x, the tongue is flat ("laminal"), and in retroflex consonants like Mandarin sh, the tip of the tongue is raised ("apical").
www.sevenhills.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Postalveolar_consonant   (216 words)

  
 Epiglottal consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
An epiglottal consonant is a consonant that is articulated with the epiglottis against the back of the pharynx.
The epiglottal consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet are:
On several occasions, when supposedly pharyngeal consonants were actually measured, they turned out to be epiglottals.
www.sevenhills.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Epiglottal_consonant   (325 words)

  
 A Guide To The IPA   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
This indicates that the consonant is aspirated: tʰ, dʰ.
This indicates that the consonant is labialized; that is, pronounced with rounded lips: [tʷ].
This indicates that the consonant is pharyngealized; that is, pronounced with a constricted pharynx: [tˤ].
www.ultrasw.com /pawlowski/brendan/ipa.html   (4418 words)

  
 IPA Tables
Compare the consonant at the beginning of the sounds: pair and bare; tail and dale; kiddy and giddy; sue and zoo, few and view.
Formed by as plosive consonants, but with slower separation of the articulating organs, so thatthe corresponding fricative is audible as the separation takes place.
Consonants which can be held on continuously without change of quality are sometimes classed together as contunatives or continuantsl they include nasal, lateral, rolled, fricative consonants and frictionless sounds.
www.sungwh.freeserve.co.uk /sapienti/phon/ipasymb.htm   (1574 words)

  
 Describing consonants   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Which consonant you're pronouncing depends on where in the vocal tract the constriction is and how narrow it is. It also depends on a few other things, such as whether the vocal folds are vibrating and whether air is flowing through the nose.
In an alveolar consonant, the tongue tip (or less often the tongue blade) approaches or touches the alveolar ridge, the ridge immediately behind the upper teeth.
It is often useful to display the consonants of a language in the form of a chart.
www.umanitoba.ca /linguistics/russell/138/2001/artic/describing-consonants.html   (1375 words)

  
 B   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In English, the letter b by itself usual denotes the voiced bilabial plosive (IPA /b/), as in bib, and it sometimes is "silent", as in debt or comb.
In most other languages that use the Latin alphabet, the letter a denotes the voiced bilabial plosive (IPA /b/), although in Spanish, in medial position it denotes the voiced bilabial fricative (IPA /β/).
Variants of the letter b denote related bilabial consonant s, like voiced bilabial implosive and the bilabial trill.
www.purpleuniverse.com /true_associate-B.html   (629 words)

  
 M: m t bank, m m, m m.com
M is also the name of a now-defunct professional videocassette format developed by Matsushita and RCA.
The letter M represents the bilabial nasal consonant sound, IPA [m], in Classical languages as well as the modern languages.
In modern terminology this would be described as a syllabic consonant IPA [m̩].
wikipedia.openfun.org /wiki/M   (844 words)

  
 Speech Terms
Bilabial: A consonant that is articulated using both lips; /p/ or /b/ or /w/.
Consonants: A speech sound that is not a vowel.
The frequency of a sound wave is measured as the number of complete back-and-forth vibrations of a particle of the medium per unit of time.
researchweb.watson.ibm.com /people/l/lvsubram/teaching/speech/speechterms.htm   (2689 words)

  
 Greek language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Note: [z] was an allophone of [s], used before voiced consonants, and in particular in the combination [zd] written as zeta (ζ).
ν before bilabials and velars is pronounced /m/ and /ŋ/ respectively, and is written μ (συμπάθεια) and γ (συγχρονίζω) when this happens within a word.
The consonants b, d, g became v, dh, gh (dh is /ð/ and gh is // and the new pronunciation of kh is /x/).
www.infothis.com /find/Greek_language   (1736 words)

  
 Translator, Adapter, Screenwriter
For instance, the word “stop” may be pronounced with a momentary closing of the mouth on the voiceless bilabial stop “p,” then an opening of the mouth after, when the air is released.
The detector also underlines those bilabial consonants (b, m, p) wherever they occur, and puts a small circle underneath the semilabials (f, v, w, English retroflex “r”).
I’m expected to put bilabial consonants over the bilabial consonants in the original text, so that the viewer can be tricked into believing that the screen actor is really pronouncing what the studio actor is saying.
www.accurapid.com /journal/05dubb.htm   (3395 words)

  
 Zoque
A palatal glide + consonant sequence, due to morpheme concatenation, is pronounced with the glide following the consonant.
When /y/ precedes a consonant, the glide is realized after the consonant.
Rather, palatalization is involved: the vowel articulation of the glide is pronounced as a secondary palatal articulation on the following consonant.
www.ling.ohio-state.edu /~mcarmstr/mirror/Zoque.html   (246 words)

  
 Table of Contents
The second experiment studied patterns of upper and lower lip interactions, movement variability within and across speakers, and the effects on lip and jaw kinematics of stop consonant voicing and vowel context.
Again, the results showed that the lips were moving at a high velocity at the onset of the oral closure.
No consistent influences of stop consonant voicing were observed on lip and jaw kinematics in five subjects, nor on a derived measure of lip aperture.
www.asha.org /about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr/40/04?articleabstract=877   (330 words)

  
 [No title]
Variation in the treatment of 'ia' in foreign words: roshia/roshiya 'Russia' girishia/girisha 'Greece' Further comments on pronunciation: The following phonological phenomena were not incorporated into the pronunciation field, but are listed here in case they may be of use.
yom-u) n5 A five-step (godan) verb in which the final stem consonant is n (e.g.
tor-u) s5 A five-step (godan) verb in which the final stem consonant is s (e.g.
www.ldc.upenn.edu /Catalog/docs/LDC96L17/ch_japanese_lex   (1333 words)

  
 Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology
We need at least another rule to explain why the first consonant of the simple form is deleted when the suffix is added in 'send', 'write' and 'hit'.
[p] is bilabial so [n] assimilates to the same place of articulation and becomes a bilabial as well), but it doesn't happen in [tanim] which alternates with [tamn].
Fourthly, some of the consonants in some forms undergo metathesis in which they swap places after vowel deletion (this is in fact quite common in morphological alternations in many languages).
panania.ling.mq.edu.au /units/ling210-901/phonology/generative   (3416 words)

  
 Palatal consonant - TheBestLinks.com - Consonant, English language, German language, Italian language, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Palatal consonant - TheBestLinks.com - Consonant, English language, German language, Italian language,...
Palatal, Palatal consonant, Consonant, English language, German language...
For example, English [S] (spelled sh) has such a palatal component, although its primary articulation involves the tip of the tongue and the upper gum (this type of articulation is called palatoalveolar).
www.thebestlinks.com /Palatal.html   (160 words)

  
 Upto11.net - Artist Profile for M   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
M is the thirteenth letter of the Latin alphabet.
The letter M represents the bilabial nasal consonant sound, IPA in Classical languages as well as the modern languages.
In modern terminology this would be described as a syllabic consonant andmdash; IPA.
www.upto11.net /artistprofile.php?ar=194591   (704 words)

  
 Velar consonant - TheBestLinks.com - Consonant, English language, Hebrew language, International Phonetic Alphabet, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Velar, Velar consonant, Consonant, English language, Hebrew language...
The velar consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet are:
Intervocalic 'g' in Spanish often described instead as a very lightly articulated voiced velar fricative.
www.thebestlinks.com /Velar.html   (241 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.