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Topic: Binomial nomenclature


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In the News (Wed 24 Apr 19)

  
  Binomial nomenclature - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
As the word "binomial" suggests, the scientific name of a species is formed by the combination of two terms: the genus name and the species descriptor.
The adoption of a system of binomial nomenclature is due to Swedish botanist and physician Carolus Linnaeus (1707–1778) who attempted to describe the entire known natural world and gave every species (mineral, vegetable or animal) a two-part name.
However, binomial nomenclature in various forms existed before Linnaeus, and was used by the Bauhins, who lived nearly two hundred years before Linnaeus.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Binomial_nomenclature   (849 words)

  
 Binomial nomenclature - Wikipedia
As the word 'binomial' suggests, the scientific name of each organism is actually the combination of two names: the genus and the species (as epithet).
Nomenclature intends to keep names stable, but quite often this is not true: an organism may have several names, reflecting different rank and position in taxonomy, depending on opinion (see synonymy[?]), conservation[?] according to nomenclature codes[?], and new findings based on molecular phylogeny.
Nomenclature must acknowledge the achievement of scientists who were first to name a taxon.
wikipedia.findthelinks.com /bi/Binomial_nomenclature.html   (316 words)

  
 Binomial nomenclature - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
As the word 'binomial' suggests, the scientific name of a species is formed by the combination of two terms: the genus name and the species epithet or descriptor.
It is a common misconception that Linnaeus also invented binomial nomenclature; in fact it dates back to the Bauhins, who lived nearly 200 years before Linnaeus.
He was, however, the first to systematize and popularize binomial nomenclature, and it is only one aspect of his systematical achievements or misachievements (such as oversimplifying fungal systematics).
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Binomial_nomenclature   (1358 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Binomial nomenclature   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Binomial name Canis lupus Linnaeus, 1758 The Wolf or Grey Wolf (Canis lupus) is a mammal of the Canidae family and the ancestor of the domestic dog.
Binomial name Escherichia coli T. Escherich, 1885 E. coli at 10,000x magnification Escherichia coli, usually abbreviated to E. coli, discovered by Theodor Escherich, a pediatrician and bacteriologist, is one of the main species of bacteria that live in the lower intestines of warm-blooded animals, including birds and mammals.
Binomial name Escherichia coli T. Escherich, 1885 Escherichia coli (usually abbreviated to E. coli) is one of the main species of bacteria that live in the lower intestines of warm-blooded animals (including birds and mammals) and are necessary for the proper digestion of food.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Binomial-nomenclature   (2054 words)

  
 Linnaean taxonomy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The greatest innovation of Linnaeus, and still the most important aspect of this system, is the general use of binomial nomenclature, the combination of a genus name and a single specific epithet ("sapiens" in the example above), to uniquely identify each species of organism.
This uniqueness and stability are, of course, a result of the acceptance by working systematists (biologists specializing in taxonomy); not merely of the binomial nomenclature in itself, but of much more complex codes of rules and procedures governing the use of these names.
These rules—or at least those governing the nomenclature and classification of plants and fungi—are contained in the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, maintained by the International Association for Plant Taxonomy.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Linnaean_taxonomy   (841 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - classification : Binomial Nomenclature (Biology, General) - Encyclopedia
The present system of binomial nomenclature identifies each species by a scientific name of two words, Latin in form and usually derived from Greek or Latin roots.
There are two international organizations for the determination of the rules of nomenclature and the recording of specific names, one for zoology and one for botany.
According to the rules they have established, the first name to be published (from the work of Linnaeus on) is the correct name of any organism unless it is reclassified in such a way as to affect that name (for example, if it is moved from one genus to another).
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/classifi-binomial-nomenclature.html   (450 words)

  
 Scientific Classification   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The binomial nomenclature is not only more precise and standardized; it also relates plants together, thus adding much interest and information in the name.
Binomial Classification Early on in naming species taxonomists realized that there would have to be a universal system of nomenclature.
Binomial classification in its simplest form is a way of naming a species by means of two names both in Latin.
freepapers.8m.com /sci/bio/Scientific_Classification.html   (933 words)

  
 BioEd Online Slides: binomial nomenclature, taxonomy, Linnaeus, species
The Swedish scientist, Carolus von Linnaeus, is credited with introducing binomial nomenclature and hierarchical classification as an organized way of naming and describing organisms and their relationships to one another.
Binomial nomenclature refers to the use of a two-part name for each species (one name designating genus and one designating species).
In the binomial system, genus is always a noun, underlined (or italicized), and capitalized; species is a descriptive term, underlined (or italicized), and not capitalized.
www.bioedonline.org /slides/slide01.cfm?q=binomial+nomenclature&dpg=2   (455 words)

  
 Binomial nomenclature - EvoWiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Binomial nomenclature is the most common naming convention used for organisms.
Binomials are far more useful than common or regional names, which as their name implies, vary substantially, and they are often descriptive.
For instance, the binomial for a type of tremalale, Pseudohydnum gelatinosa, is marvelously descriptive, meaning: "gelatinous false-tooth" which admirably describes this organism.
wiki.cotch.net /wiki.phtml?title=Binomial   (184 words)

  
 Evolutionary Biology/Carl Linnaeus - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks
One of his principle contributions was the taxonomic system of binomial nomenclature.
Binomial nomenclature consists of the two Latin names given to an organism.
Even though Linnaeus was not (?) the first to use the binomial naming system, he was the first to use it frequently enough for the system to be accepted and used more often by scientists everywhere.
en.wikibooks.org /wiki/Carl_Linnaeus   (455 words)

  
 Learn more about Binomial nomenclature in the online encyclopedia.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Learn more about Binomial nomenclature in the online encyclopedia.
A species can be further divided into any of subspecies, variety, subvariety or form.
In particular, when species are transferred between genera (as not uncommonly happens as a result of new knowledge), whereever possible species names are kept the same.
www.onlineencyclopedia.org /b/bi/binomial_nomenclature.html   (683 words)

  
 Stephen Nottingham: Beetroot - Chapter 3
The first is the taxonomic system called binomial nomenclature and the second is the more flexible horticultural classification system.
Binomial nomenclature can be extended below the species level (infraspecific classification), by including the ranks of subspecies (subsp.) and variety (var.).
Binomial nomenclature has been very successful in cataloguing the world's biodiversity, but its use below the species level may not always be appropriate for cultivated plants.
ourworld.compuserve.com /homepages/Stephen_Nottingham/beetroot3.htm   (6761 words)

  
 CANTINO, PHILIP D.* AND STEVEN J. WAGSTAFF.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Nomenclatural stability is a widely stated objective of taxonomy, but the Linnaean binomial system is not well suited to promote stability of species names.
Transition to a system of hyphenated uninomials would not be traumatic if the uninomials were based on currently accepted binomials and utilized the same types.
Hyphenated uninomials would be compatible with both the rank-based system of nomenclature represented by the ICBN and the rankless phylogenetic nomenclature proposed by de Queiroz and Gauthier.
www.ou.edu /cas/botany-micro/bsa-abst/section13/abstracts/10.shtml   (309 words)

  
 How animals are given scientific names
There are three main Codes of Nomenclature: the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, covering animals; the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, covering plants (including fungi); and the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria.
Hugh Strickland presented a Code of nomenclature to the British Association for the Advancement of Science (Charles Darwin was on its committee).
The Commission of Zoological Nomenclature decide that an available name is never to be used as a valid name despite the fact that it might be a senior synonym or homonym.
www.museums.org.za /bio/animal_nomenclature.htm   (3011 words)

  
 Binomial nomenclature : Scientific name   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The genus is typically capitalized, while the species isn't; both are typeset in italics.
Nomenclature intends to keep names stable, but quite often this isn't true: an organism may have several names, reflecting different rank and position in taxonomy, depending on opinion (see synonymy[?]), conservation[?] according to nomenclature codes[?], and new findings based on molecular phylogeny.
For example, the ICBN plant nomenclature doesn't allow tautonymy, whereas the ICZN animal code allows it.
www.explainthat.info /sc/scientific-name.html   (637 words)

  
 Why Plant Catalogs Use Confusing Latin
nomenclature - "binomial" because each organism has two names that identify it uniquely, and "nomenclature" because it sounds cool.
Rose is called, in binomial nomenclature, Rosa carolina.
There is naturally occurring double form of this rose, and its scientific name is Rosa carolina plena ("plena" from the Lain word meaning "full.") Rosa carolina plena is called a variety, and should probably be written Rosa carolina var.
www.emmitsburg.net /gardens/articles/frederick/2001/plant_nomaclature.htm   (582 words)

  
 Nomenclatural Glossary for Zoology - Thomson Scientific
In zoological works genus-group names cited in binomial names of species are often abbreviated to one or two letters, which should always be followed by a full stop, and not used on the first mention of a name; similarly for specific names cited in trinomial names of subspecies.
the nomenclatural act of an author or the Commission in fixing, by an express statement, the name-bearing type of a newly or previously established nominal genus, subgenus, species, or subspecies.
the level, for nomenclatural purposes, of a taxon in a taxonomic hierarchy (e.g.
scientific.thomson.com /support/products/zr/zoological-glossary   (7319 words)

  
 You Grow Girl | Binomial Nomeclature
Binomial nomenclature is also referred to as the latin or scientific name.
A species is also a group of plants that can be readily distinguished from other plants based on physical appearance but, because plants are so variable, species can be broken down into subspecies and varieties, because sometimes plants that look different can actually interbreed.
Binomial nomenclature refers to the two part name of each species.
www.yougrowgirl.com /explore/binomial.php   (391 words)

  
 Binomial nomenclature - TheBestLinks.com - Binomial name, Animal, Biology, Bacteria, ...
Binomial nomenclature - TheBestLinks.com - Binomial name, Animal, Biology, Bacteria,...
Binomial name, Binomial nomenclature, Animal, Biology, Bacteria, Bacterium...
es:nomenclatura binomial fr:Nom binomial it:Nomenclatura binomiale nl:Binominale nomenclatuur ja:学名 zh:双名法
www.thebestlinks.com /Binomial_name.html   (972 words)

  
 Talk:Binomial nomenclature - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The first edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria and Viruses was published in 1958
Names that were not included in the APPROVED LISTS of 1980 lost standing in bacterial nomenclature.
The official "Nomenclatural Starting Date" is 1 January 1980: "One work is deemed to have been published on that date." [1]
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:Binomial_nomenclature   (1479 words)

  
 [No title]
Binomial nomenclature gives every organism a twoword name, called a scientific name.
Binomial nomenclature gives every organism a two-word name called a scientific name.
binomial nomenclature classify families genus kingdoms orders phyla species classes taxonomy traits The branch of biology that classifies living things is called _____________.
www.palmbeach.k12.fl.us /Multicultural/ESOLCurriculumDocs/Secondary/GR9-12BiologyU5.DOC   (3828 words)

  
 Curiosities of Biological Nomenclature
In botanical nomenclature, the authors are given in taxonomic monographs, and if a name is changed, both the original author (in parentheses) and the revising author are named.
For an extensive and growing list and description of biodiversity, organized in the context of the evolutionary tree, see The Tree of Life.
Definitions and Abbreviations for an index of rules for bacterial nomenclature.
home.earthlink.net /~misaak/taxonomy.html   (1356 words)

  
 PhyloCode   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
As a result, the examples in the current version use binomials governed by the rank-based codes when species names are cited in the phylogenetic definitions of clade names.
The ISPN membership will elect the Committee on Phylogenetic Nomenclature, the responsibilities of which are explained in Art.
We are grateful to Richard Piccard, Academic Technology Manager in Computer Services at Ohio University, for technical support, and to Andy Anderson for preparing the downloadable MS-Word and PDF files for the April 2000 draft.
www.ohiou.edu /phylocode   (696 words)

  
 Plant Names
One area of horticulture which continually seems to intimidate many students of the discipline is the language of horticulture, binomial nomenclature.
Obviously more specific information is needed and this is where binomial nomenclature, also called the botanical or scientific name, comes in.
Adherence to the simple rules of binomial nomenclature will produce greater consistency and reliability in the nursery, floriculture, and landscape industries.
www.hcs.ohio-state.edu /hcs/TMI/HORT234/Nomenclature.html   (742 words)

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