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Topic: Biosafety Protocol


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In the News (Wed 22 May 19)

  
  BIO | The Biosafety Protocol-An Overview
The Biosafety Protocol (BSP) is an outgrowth of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), a multilateral treaty for protecting biodiversity.
The Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity intended for the Biosafety Protocol to govern the transboundary movement of Living Modified Organisms (LMOs) that may have an adverse effect on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity.
As such, the Protocol's scope and AIA provisions must be limited to those LMOs and intended uses that may realistically have a significant adverse effect on biodiversity.
www.bio.org /foodag/action/biosafety.asp   (1460 words)

  
 Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety
It is called the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to honor Colombia, which hosted the extraordinary Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in Cartagena in 1999.
Although the United States is not a Party to the CBD and therefore cannot become a Party to the Biosafety Protocol, the U.S. participated in the negotiation of the text and the subsequent preparations for entry into force under the Intergovernmental Committee on the Cartagena Protocol.
The Protocol's AIA procedure, in effect, requires an exporter to seek consent from an importing country prior to the first shipment of a living modified organism (LMO) intended for introduction into the environment (e.g., seeds for planting, fish for release, and microorganisms for bioremediation).
www.state.gov /g/oes/rls/fs/2004/28621.htm   (980 words)

  
 Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety
The Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity adopted a supplementary agreement to the Convention known as the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety on 29 January 2000.
The Biosafety Clearing-House was established by the Protocol to facilitate the exchange of information on living modified organisms and to assist countries in the implementation of the Protocol.
The Protocol pages contain information on ratification of the Protocol, meeting details and documents, and highlights of the programme of work of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Protocol, including the history of development of the Biosafety Clearing-House.
bch.biodiv.org /about/protocol.shtml   (339 words)

  
 IELRC.ORG - The biosafety protocol: an introduction
The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to the Convention on Biological Diversity (Cartagena Protocol) was adopted in early 2000.
The Protocol, however, recognises that there may be cases where scientific information and knowledge regarding the extent of the potential adverse effects of a living modified organism on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity in the importing state may insufficient to provide certain conclusions.
As noted, the Protocol is in essence a trade agreement allowing import restrictions for certain categories of LMOs and allowing import states to bar importation even in cases where scientific information with regard to potential adverse effects on the environment or human health is insufficient at the time of decision.
www.ielrc.org /content/f0202.htm   (3015 words)

  
 CRS Report: RL30594 - Biosafety Protocol for Genetically Modified Organisms: Overview - NLE
The Biosafety Protocol to the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) was adopted in January 2000, by the 176 nations that are parties to the CBD.
The Protocol addresses a major area of concern that was not resolved by the parent CBD in 1992 — the safe handling, transfer and trade of biological organisms.
The Biosafety Protocol creates the procedure by requiring exporters to seek consent from importers before the first shipment of a GMO is introduced into the environment (applies to seeds for planting, fish for field release, and microorganisms for environmental bioremediation).
www.ncseonline.org /nle/crsreports/agriculture/ag-93.cfm   (4583 words)

  
 ASBP Biosafety
While the primary goal of the Biosafety Protocol is to prevent environmental damage due to the release of genetically engineered crops, the Protocol also has potentially serious general implications for trade and technology transfer.
A colloquium on biosafety, held in conjunction with a workshop on the implementation of Plant Variety Protection in Morocco, was organized on March 24-26, 1997 in Rabat, Morocco.
FAO and the Biosafety Protocol to the Convention on Biological Diversity: provides information on the work of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) related to aspects of the biosafety protocol.
www.iia.msu.edu /absp/biosafety.html   (1582 words)

  
 SD: Knowledge : FAO and the Biosafety Protocol to the Convention on Biological Diversity
The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety was adopted by the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity as a supplementary agreement to the Convention on 29 January 2000.
The Protocol seeks to protect biological diversity from the potential risks posed by living modified organisms resulting from modern biotechnology, and establishes an advanced informed agreement (AIA) procedure for ensuring that countries are provided with the information necessary to make informed decisions before agreeing to the import of such organisms into their territory.
The biosafety and other environmental components of the draft FAO Code were accordingly forwarded to the Executive Secretary of the CBD, at the request of the Commission, as an input to the CBD's proposed protocol.
www.fao.org /sd/rtdirect/rtre0034.htm   (1867 words)

  
 Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety is an international agreement on biosafety, as a supplement to the Convention on Biological Diversity.
The Protocol applies to the transboundary movement, transit, handling and use of all living modified organisms that may have adverse effects on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, taking also into account risks to human health (Article 4 of the Protocol, SCBD 2000).
Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (2000) Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to the Convention on Biological Diversity: text and annexes.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cartagena_Protocol_on_Biosafety   (1827 words)

  
 2003 September 12 - Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety Takes Effect
The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, the first legally binding international agreement governing the transboundary movement of living modified organisms resulting from modern biotechnology, entered into force on September 11.
The protocol establishes a harmonized set of international rules and procedures designed to ensure that countries are provided with the necessary information to enable them to make informed decisions before agreeing to the import of LMOs.  It also ensures that LMO shipments are accompanied by appropriate identification documentation.
In addition, the information specified in the protocol, including: national laws for implementing the protocol; any bilateral, regional and multilateral agreements entered regarding transboundary movement of LMOs and summaries of risk assessments of LMOs must be provided through the BCH.
www.uscib.org /index.asp?documentID=2739   (571 words)

  
 Biosafety Protocol - the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety
The need for a Biosafety Protcol is clear - so too is the evidence that it won’t harm trade but will help consumers to get food that is GM-free, as well as giving countries a framework for protecting their environments and biodiversity where GMO imports are concerned.
The Biosafety Protocol was finally adopted after a series of difficult negotiations complicated by the obstruction of a small minority of GMO-exporting countries, namely the USA, Canada, Argentina and their associates Australia, Chile and Uruguay.
The Biodiversity Protocol agreed that shipments of GM commodities should bear labels saying they "may contain" genetically-modified organisms and are not intended for intentional introduction into the environment.
www.ukabc.org /cartagena.htm   (4431 words)

  
 Welcome to Biosafety News Online
The countdown to the entry into force was triggered by the ratification of the Protocol by the Republic of Palau, which was the 50th State to ratify the Protocol on 13 June.
The Protocol establishes a harmonized set of international rules and procedures designed to ensure that countries are provided with the information necessary to enable them to make informed decisions before agreeing to the import of such organisms into their territory.
Since the adoption of the Protocol in January 2000, the Intergovernmental Committee for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, or ICCP, the ad-hoc body established by the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity, has met three times under the able Chairmanship of Ambassador Philemon Yang of Cameroon.
www.biosafetynews.com /septemberSpecial03/story8.htm   (1684 words)

  
 AFRICAN CENTRE FOR BIOSAFETY   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Critically important provisions of the Biosafety Protocol that form the cornerstones of biosafety regulation have been omitted from the Bill in its entirely.
It must be noted that the Biosafety Protocol establishes international rules that are considered to be a "floor" rather than a "ceiling" for the drafting of a regulatory framework.
In other words, the rules of the Protocol are the minimum standards for achieving the objectives of the Protocol.
www.biosafetyafrica.net /kenya.htm   (530 words)

  
 Food Trade and the Biosafety Protocol
The decision provided that the Parties develop a Protocol on biosafety, specifically focusing on transboundary movement of any living modified organism resulting from modern biotechnology that may have adverse effect on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, setting out for consideration, in particular, appropriate procedures for advance informed agreement.
The preambular text notes that, "this Protocol shall not be interpreted as implying a change in the rights and obligations of a Party under any existing international agreements." Thus, the Protocol does not presume to alter rights and obligations under any WTO agreements, such as TBT or SPS.
The provisions of this Protocol shall not affect intentional transboundary movements that take place pursuant to such agreements and arrangements as between the parties to those agreements or arrangements.
www.thunderlake.com /biosafety.html   (1096 words)

  
 Christian Aid policy report Biosafety Protocol
As the Biosafety Protocol talks resumed in Montreal, negotiators were aware that the issues that paralysed trade negotiations in Seattle remained and could not be ignored.
A biosafety agreement that focused on narrow trade interests would not take adequate account of safety in the marginalised South, nor of the risks that GMOs pose to the livelihood of local and indigenous communities in developing countries, whose social, agricultural and economic systems are inextricably linked to the maintenance of biodiversity.
The Protocol states that it and the WTO are to be mutually supportive, but it then says the Protocol is not to affect the rights and obligations of governments under any existing international agreement.
www.christian-aid.org.uk /indepth/0003bios/biosafet.htm   (2116 words)

  
 "Reflections on the Biosafety Protocol Negotiations in Montreal"
Although the Protocol suffers from a number of significant gaps and ambiguities, its conclusion represents a major achievement for countries and societies around the world concerned about the impacts of modern biotechnology on their well-being.
The exception was the Miami Group, which stated, with Canada acting as spokesman, that it wanted a WTO override clause in the Protocol, and that a reference to the precautionary principle in the operational clauses of the Protocol was not acceptable.
In the case of the Biosafety Protocol, Environment Canada and Health Canada lost control of the file to Foreign Affairs and International Trade and Agriculture and Agri-Food early on, and were never really able to regain control.
www.biotech-info.net /BSP_reflections.html   (3449 words)

  
 :: Cambodia Biosafety Clearing-House   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The Biosafety Clearing-House (BCH) is an information exchange mechanism established by the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to assist Parties, i.e.
The Biosafety Clearing-House was implemented in a phased manner, beginning with a pilot phase, following the recommendation of the first meeting of the Intergovernmental Committee for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety (ICCP).
In decision BS-I/3 on Information-sharing and the Biosafety Clearing-House, the first meeting of the Parties to the Protocol approved the transition of the pilot phase of the Biosafety Clearing-House to the fully operational phase.
www.cambodiabiosafety.org   (263 words)

  
 Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety: Treaty on Trade in Biotech Organisms to Become Law ENS 13jun03
The protocol is a supplementary agreement to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), a wider international treaty that protects the variety of life on Earth, including the genetic differences between species and within each species.
Governments that are Parties to the CBD adopted the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety on January 29, 2000 in Cartegena, Colombia.
The Biosafety Protocol deals primarily with GMOs that are to be intentionally introduced into the environment, such as seeds, trees or fish, and with genetically modified farm commodities, such as corn and grain used for food, animal feed or processing.
www.mindfully.org /GE/2003/Cartagena-Protocol-Biosafety13jun03.htm   (952 words)

  
 Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety - Historical Background
The UNEP Guidelines are intended to provide a technical framework for risk management commensurate with risk assessment, without prejudice to the development of a biosafety protocol by the COP of the CBD.
While it is far too early to assume an emerging consensus on a protocol or a successful outcome, the behavior of some delegations exhibites an acknowledgement of the importance of being "at the table" as the negotiations unfold and consensus on its necessity emerges.
In Decision IV/3, "Issues related to biosafety", COP-4 extends the deadline for the negotiation of a Protocol from the end of 1998 to early 1999 and establishes an extra meeting to be followed by an Extraordinary Conference of the Parties to the CBD to adopt the Protocol in 1999.
www.biosafetyprotocol.be /history.html   (1686 words)

  
 CARTAGENA PROTOCOL ON BIOSAFETY ENTERS INTO FORCE IN SEPTEMBER
The Protocol deals primarily with GMOs that are to be intentionally introduced into the environment (such as seeds, trees or fish) and with genetically modified farm commodities (such as corn and grain used for food, animal feed or processing).
Governments will exchange information through a Biosafety Clearing-House and are to base their decisions on scientifically sound risk assessments.  In cases where scientific certainty is lacking due to insufficient scientific information about a GMO's potential adverse effects, a government may take a decision based on a desire to avoid or minimize such potential adverse effects.
Recognizing the potential trade implications of the agreement, the drafters of the Cartagena Protocol made every effort to ensure that its provisions and those of the World Trade Organization are mutually supportive.  The Protocol states that its provisions are intended neither to override nor to be subordinate to existing international agreements.
www.un.org /News/Press/docs/2003/unep157.doc.htm   (754 words)

  
 Belgian Biosafety Clearing-House - Belgian Contact Points
The Division of Biosafety and Biotechnology (SBB), in collaboration with the Belgian focal point for the Convention on biological diversity (CBD), is proposing a training programme for national Biosafety Clearing-House (BCH) Focal Points of developing countries.
The Biosafety Clearing-House (see Article 20 of the Cartagena Protocol) is a critical component for the implementation of the Biosafety Protocol.
To apply, a written request from/through the National Focal Point for the Cartagena Protocol of the developing country must be directed, as a first step, to the BCH Belgian Focal Point.
www.biosafetyprotocol.be /partnership.html   (453 words)

  
 Biosafety Protocol 1999 - Global Issues
The February 1999 Biodiversity Protocol meeting in Colombia broke down because USA, not even a signatory to the Convention on Biological Diversity, to which the protocol is meant to be part of, and five other countries of the "Miami Group" felt that their business interests were threatened.
This section on the Biosafety Protocol covers what happened at the conference in Colombia that aimed to tackle the saftey issues of living modified organisms, which not only affects food, which the GE Food section is about, but other areas where LMOs could be used, such as medicine.).
Other issues are also pushed to the side line, as seen in the GE Food section, such as labeling, patenting (or biopiracy, from the view points of indigenous peoples who lose the right to use their own knowledge), food security and costs of using these technologies.
www.globalissues.org /EnvIssues/Biodiversity/BioSafety1999.asp   (684 words)

  
 Biotechnology and Development Monitor, No. 43, p. 2-7.
On 30 January 2000, the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety (CPB) was adopted in Montreal by delegates of 128 Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).
The majority of emerging biosafety laws of in developing countries also adhere to the European concept of mandatory labelling and the international markets are about to accept and implement such labelling and segregation conditions in response to consumer demands.
It would be fatal for the biosafety process if the implementation of the CPB were to be led by countries that are opposed to the Precautionary Principle and the spirit of the CPB.
www.biotech-monitor.nl /4302.htm   (2885 words)

  
 Biosafety - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Biosafety: prevention of large-scale loss of biological integrity, focusing both on ecology and human health.
The international Biosafety Protocol deals primarily with the agricultural definition but many advocacy groups seek to expand it to include post-genetic threats: new molecules, artificial life forms, and even robots which may compete directly in the natural food chain.
Biosafety in agriculture, chemistry, medicine, exobiology and beyond will likely require application of the precautionary principle, and a new definition focused on the biological nature of the threatened organism rather than the nature of the threat.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Biosafety   (320 words)

  
 "The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety," Economic Perspectives, September 2003
The objective of this first Protocol to the CBD is to contribute to the safe transfer, handling and use of living modified organisms (LMOs) — such as genetically engineered plants, animals and microbes — that cross international borders.
The Protocol includes a "savings clause," which states that the agreement shall not be interpreted as implying a change in the rights and obligations of a Party under any existing international agreement, including, for example, World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements.
The Protocol's requirement for documentation identifying commodity shipments as "may contain living modified organisms" and "not intended for intentional introduction into the environment" can be accomplished through shipping documentation.
usinfo.state.gov /journals/ites/0903/ijee/cartagena.htm   (934 words)

  
 ENB : EXCOP Biosafety Protocol
She noted that this Protocol is a first major step in a long journey; that the NGOs look forward to going home to work with national governments at the regional level; and that they look forward to working with the COP again on the liability regime.
Global Industry Coalition's representative commented that the Protocol was represented a significant step forward, by providing a framework to protect biodiversity, by recognizing the importance of the biotech industy, and by building a framework for continued investment in production, innovation, and development, from which we can all share the resulting social and economic benefits.
At this point, reports from the CBD Secretariat confirmed receipt of the draft protocol text in all 6 official UN languages, however, conflicting Miami Group interests were played out in the corridors while other participants and interest groups speculated or slept in the Plenary hall.
www.iisd.ca /biodiv/excop   (639 words)

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