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Topic: Boiling


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  Boiling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Boiling is the rapid vaporization of a liquid, which typically occurs when a liquid is heated to a temperature such that its vapor pressure is above that of the surroundings, such as air pressure.
Thus, a liquid may also boil when the pressure of the surrounding atmosphere is sufficiently reduced, such as the use of a vacuum pump or at high altitudes.
Transition boiling may be defined as the unstable boiling, which occurs at surface temperatures between the maximum attainable in nucleate and the minimum attainable in film boiling.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Boiling   (511 words)

  
 Boiling point - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The boiling point of a substance is the temperature at which it can change its state from a liquid to a gas throughout the bulk of the liquid at a given pressure.
Boiling on the other hand is a bulk process, so at the boiling point molecules anywhere in the liquid may be vaporized, resulting in the formation of vapor bubbles.
The boiling point corresponds to the temperature at which the vapor pressure of the substance equals the ambient pressure.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Boiling_point   (920 words)

  
 Cookbook:Boiling - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks
As the water heats in the process of boiling, tiny bubbles appear on the bottom of the vessel in which it is contained and rise to the surface.
As water boils, some of it constantly passes off in the form of steam, and for this reason sirups or sauces become thicker the longer they are cooked.
Another point to observe in the boiling process is that foods boiled rapidly in water have a tendency to lose their shape and are reduced to small pieces if allowed to boil long enough.
en.wikibooks.org /wiki/Cookbook:Boiling   (536 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - boiling point (Physics) - Encyclopedia
When heat is applied to a liquid, the temperature of the liquid rises until the vapor pressure of the liquid equals the pressure of the surrounding gases.
For example, water will boil at a lower temperature at the top of a mountain, where the atmospheric pressure on the water is less, than it will at sea level, where the pressure is greater.
The boiling point of a solution is always higher than that of the pure solvent; this boiling-point elevation is one of the colligative properties common to all solutions.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/B/boilingp.html   (388 words)

  
 NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Boiling point   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
A somewhat clearer (and perhaps more useful) definition of boiling point is "the temperature at which the vapor pressure of the liquid equals the pressure of the surroundings." Vapor pressure is the pressure of a vapor in equilibrium with its non-vapor phases.
Saturation Pressure, or vapor point, is the pressure for a corresponding saturation temperature at which a liquid boils into its vapor phase.
Thermodynamics The Leidenfrost effect is the phenomenon in which a liquid in near contact with a mass hotter than the liquids Leidenfrost point, which is higher than its boiling point, produces an insulating vapor layer which keeps it from boiling rapidly.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Boiling-point   (1992 words)

  
 Welcome to Boiling Springs Pa, 17007
The Memorial Clock Tower, erected in 1956 and the Boiling Springs (Grist) Mill, on record as early as 1785, are two landmarks in the village.
Boiling Springs was also a site for the underground railroad before the civil war, a tourist destination in the early 1900's, a stop along the Appalachian Trail.
Boiling Springs is a fantastic community of individuals that are inspired to create that small town feel and share it with anyone who visits.
www.boilingsprings.org   (308 words)

  
 The MSDS HyperGlossary: Boiling Point
Boiling point is the temperature at which a liquid changes to a gas (vapor) at normal atmospheric pressure.
A more specific definition of boiling point is the temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the external pressure.
The normal boiling point is the temperature at which the liquid boils when the external pressure is one atmosphere (760 torr = 760 mm Hg = 1 atm = 101.3 kPa = 14.7 psi).
www.ilpi.com /msds/ref/boilingpoint.html   (437 words)

  
 How To Boil Water, Boiling Points of Water, Water Temperatures   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The difference in the boiling point between typical supplies of hard and soft water is about a degree or two.
The boiling point of water is a degree or two lower on stormy, as opposed to fair, weather days.
Water boils at 212°F (sea level), and simmers at 190°F. Tepid Water - 85 to 105°F. The water is comparable to the temperature of the human body.
www.whatscookingamerica.net /boilpoint.htm   (731 words)

  
 Boiling Point Elevation
It is the temperature at which the vapor pressure of the liquid or solvent in a solution is equal to the external pressure.
In other words, the boiling point difference of the boiling point of the solvent in the solution and the boiling point of the pure solvent is linear with the concentration.
What is the boiling point of a solution of a non-electrolyte ethylene glycol which is.05 m in water.
members.aol.com /profchm/bpelevat.html   (821 words)

  
 Hormel Foods - Knowledge - Boiling Pasta
Boiling is the method most often used for cooking pasta.
When boiling pasta it is important to use a sufficient amount of water, generally a quart of water per 4 ounces of pasta is satisfactory.
If pasta is added to water that is not at a full boil, or is cooked at a temperature that does not keep the water at a continuous boil, the pasta will absorb too much of the water and become soft and mushy.
www.hormel.com /templates/knowledge/knowledge.asp?catitemid=43&id=531   (2003 words)

  
 Vapor Pressure   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
But at the boiling point, the saturated vapor pressure is equal to atmospheric pressure, bubbles form, and the vaporization becomes a volume phenomena.
The boiling point is defined as the temperature at which the saturated vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the surrounding atmospheric pressure.
Raising or lowering the pressure by about 28 mmHg will change the boiling point by 1°C. Although the vapor pressure variation with temperature is a non-linear one, the boiling point variation can be approximated near 100°C by an empirical fit of the available data.
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu /hbase/kinetic/vappre.html   (610 words)

  
 Boiling Points
The phenomenological definition of boiling is the existance of sustained bubbles that break free of the surface.
We define a "normal" boiling point as the boiling point of the liquid at 1 atm, or another way of saying this is that the "normal" boiling point is the temperature at which the liquid's vapor pressure is equal to 1 atm.
Because the boiling point of water is about 90 degrees C at this altitude., not only will our camper find that his food will cook a little slower than normal, any attempt to boil water to kill germs and pathogens may be unsuccessful since the water isn't getting hot enough.
www.heartmagic.com /zzBoilingPoints.html   (1660 words)

  
 hops and boiling
Boiling, as part of the brewing process, however, is different: it is more important than anything else.
Well, boiling stabilizes the composition of the wort, which is necessary to achieve “a stable, clear, great tasting beer of balanced character”.
This is the kind of boiling, when the wort is quickly turning around in the Kettle, large by number and huge by size bubbles are created in the bottom of the vessel.
bavarianbrewerytech.com /news/boilhops.htm   (1251 words)

  
 Pool Boiling Experiment in Microgravity
Steady state pool boiling is achieved in microgravity under conditions in which a large vapor bubble somewhat removed from the heater surface is formed, which acts as a reservoir for the nucleating bubbles.
The steady nucleate boiling heat transfer is enhanced materially in microgravity relative to that in earth gravity, while the heat flux at which dryout occurs is considerably less.
It appears that long term steady state nucleate boiling can take place on a flat heater surface in microgravity with a wetting liquid under conditions in which a large vapor bubble somewhat removed from the heater surface is formed, which acts as a reservoir to remove the bubbles from immediate vicinity of the heater surface.
www-personal.engin.umich.edu /%7Emerte/vgrl/pbe.html   (688 words)

  
 Hydrogen Bonds and Boiling Point
Eventually the molecular motion becomes so intense that the forces of attraction between the molecules is disrupted to to the extent the molecules break free of the liquid and become a gas.
In the case of water, hydrogen bonding, which is a special case of polar dipole forces exerts a very strong effect to keep the molecules in a liquid state until a fairly high temperature is reached.
This is shown in the graphic on the left for a similar set of molecules in Group VI of the periodic table.
www.elmhurst.edu /~chm/vchembook/163boilingpt.html   (407 words)

  
 Boiling and Bacillus Spores | CDC EID
At the conclusion of the various boiling times, the samples were removed from the heat source and allowed to cool at room temperature before analysis.
Boiling for 5 min in an uncovered vessel was not as effective as boiling in a covered vessel and allowed all Bacillus spp.
Boiling time refers to the total time the water is held at a rolling boil and should not be confused with the first sign of bubbles from dissolved gases in the water.
www.cdc.gov /ncidod/EID/vol10no10/04-0158.htm   (849 words)

  
 Hydrocarbon Boiling Points
Boiling is a physical change whereby a liquid is converted in to a gas.
Boiling occurs when the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the atmospheric pressure pushing on the liquid.
You have already observed the boiling points of straight chain alkanes are related to the number of carbon atoms in their molecules.
dwb.unl.edu /calculators/activities/BP.html   (790 words)

  
 Boiling Point   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Boiling point can be defined as the temperature at which the vapor pressure of a substance is equal to the external pressure.
At the boiling point the temperature remains constant until all of the liquid has been converted to the vapor state.
It is important that when you are comparing the boiling points of two substances whose molecular polarities are different that the substances be approximately the same size or the results will be biased.
members.aol.com /profchm/bp.html   (503 words)

  
 Boiling Water Bath Canning
The temperature of the boiling water bath canner is 212 degrees F (100 degrees C) and will kill bacteria in high-acid foods.
The canner should be large enough to allow the water to boil 1 to 2 inches over the jars when they are placed on the rack in the canner.
Place an extra kettle of water on the stove burner in case extra boiling water is needed to cover the jars in the canner.
www.ext.vt.edu /pubs/foods/348-594/348-594.html   (1000 words)

  
 Boiling Spring Lakes Real Estate - Homes-Homesites-Lots-Commercial-Lakefront
Boiling Spring Lakes is a quiet town eight miles northwest of Southport.
Boiling Spring Lakes is 10 minutes from Southport, 15 minutes from Oak Island, 25 minutes from Holden Beach and 30 minutes from Ocean Isle Beach.
Airports are 30 minutes north and south, as Boiling Spring is equidistant from historic Wilmington, N.C. (25 minutes north), and the entertainment, dining and golf capital of the world, Myrtle Beach, S.C. (45 minutes south).
www.boilingspringlakesrealestate.com   (575 words)

  
 Boiling   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
A liquid boils at a temperature at which its vapor pressure is equal to the pressure of the gas above it.
As a liquid is heated, its vapor pressure increases until the vapor pressure equals the pressure of the gas above it.
The boiling point of a liquid is the temperature at which its vapor pressure is equal to the pressure of the gas above it.The normal boiling point of a liquid is the temperature at which its vapor pressure is equal to one atmosphere (760 torr).
www.chem.purdue.edu /gchelp/liquids/boil.html   (392 words)

  
 Bizarre Boiling
Using a freon coolant as their liquid, they conducted a series of boiling experiments on the space shuttle during 5 missions between 1992 to 1996.
Knowledge of boiling in space might also be used someday to design power plants for space stations that use sunlight to boil a liquid to create vapour, which would then turn a turbine to produce electricity.
Scientists can use this perspective to improve their understanding of the fundamentals of boiling, which might be used to improve the design of terrestrial power plants.
www.firstscience.com /site/articles/boiling.asp   (1248 words)

  
 Dominica's Hot Water: a guide to geo-thermal and volcanic sites on the Caribbean island of Dominica   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The natural basin of the Boiling Lake collects the rainfall from the surrounding hills and from two small streams which empty into the lake.
The Valley of Desolation is crossed en route to the Boiling Lake.
Hot boiling mud, mini-geysers and fumaroles are scattered in the Valley.
www.avirtualdominica.com /hotwater.htm   (1026 words)

  
 Boiling an Egg
The 'egg inside' curve is for an egg taken from a refrigerator at 4°C. The 'egg outside' curve is for an egg that is initially at the ambient temperature (plotted above), e.g.
The first is to put the eggs into a pan of boiling water, cook for twice the time required to soft-boil them then plunge into cold water.
These procedures are intended to prevent the yolk temperature getting too high (about 70°C) when hydrogen sulphide generated by the decomposition of sulphur-containing amino acids in the white will react with iron in the yolk causing a (harmless) grey-green film of ferrous sulphide to form on the surface of the yolk.
newton.ex.ac.uk /teaching/CDHW/egg   (2055 words)

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