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Topic: Bolghar


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In the News (Thu 20 Jun 19)

  
  The Travels of Marco Polo — Volume 1 eBook
Bolghar was first captured by the Mongols in 1225.
Coins of the Kings of Bolghar, struck in the 10th century, have been described by Fraehn, as well as coins of the Mongol period struck at Bolghar.
Its latest known coin is of A.H. A history of Bolghar was written in the first half of the 12th century by Yakub Ibn Noman, Kadhi of the city, but this is not known to be extant.
www.bookrags.com /ebooks/10636/224.html   (531 words)

  
  Volga Bulgaria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Volga Bulgaria or Volga-Kama Bolghar, is a historic state that existed between the 7th and 13th centuries around the confluence of the Volga and Kama rivers in what is now the Russian Federation.
The capital, Bolghar, was a thriving city, rivalling in size and wealth the greatest centres of Islamic world.
Trade partners of Bolghar included from Viking, Bjarmland, Yugra and Nenets at the north to Baghdad and Constantinople in the south, from Western Europe to China at the East.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Volga_Bulgaria   (627 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Bolghar
Bolghar (or Bolğar) was the capital (8th-15th century) of Volga Bulgaria, a predecessor state of the Khanate of Kazan, which in turn has cultural links to today's Russian republic of Tatarstan.
Today, the capital of Tatarstan is Kazan, but many Tatars consider Bolghar to be their ancient and religious capital and to contain a glimpse of Tatar life before the Mongol invasion of the 13th century.
Bolghar was the center of a local Islamic movement known as The Little Hajj that was popular during the Soviet period.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Bolghar   (328 words)

  
 Qwika - Volga Bulgaria
Volga Bulgaria or Volga-Kama Bolghar, is a historic state that existed between the 7th and 13th centuries around the confluence of the Volga and Kama rivers in what is now the Russian Federation.
Trade partners of Bolghar included form Viking, Bjarmland, Yugra and Nenets at the north to Baghdad and Constantinople an the south, from Western Europe to China at the East.
Then, at the turn of the 12th and 13th centuries, the rulers of Vladimir (notably Andrew the Pious and Vsevolod III), anxious to defend their eastern border, systematically pillaged Bulgarian cities.
wikipedia.qwika.com /wiki/Volga_Bulgaria   (733 words)

  
 Ibn Batuta - LoveToKnow 1911
He next travelled into Kipchak (the Mongol khanate of Russia), and joined the camp of the reigning khan Mahommed Uzbeg, from whom the great and heterogeneous Uzbeg race is perhaps named.
Among other places in this empire he travelled to Bolghar (54° 54' N.) in order to witness the shortness of the summer night, and desired to continue his travels north into the "Land of Darkness" (in the extreme north of Russia), of which wonderful things were told, but was obliged to forego this.
Returning to the khan's camp he joined the cortege of one of the Khatuns, who was a Greek princess by birth (probably illegitimate) and in her train travelled to Constantinople, where he had an interview with the emperor Andronikos III.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Ibn_Batuta   (1453 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
Volga Bulgaria or Volga-Kama Bolghar, is a historic state that existed between the 7th and 13th centuries around the confluence of the Volga and Kama rivers in what is now Russia.
The capital, Bolghar, was a thriving city, rivalling in size and wealth with the greatest centres of the Islamic world.
Trade partners of Bolghar included from Vikings, Bjarmland, Yugra and Nenets in the north to Baghdad and Constantinople in the south, from Western Europe to China in the East.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Volga_Bulgaria   (742 words)

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