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Topic: Book of Kells


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  Book of Kells - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Book of Kells is the high point of a group of manuscripts produced from the late 6th century through the early 9th century in monasteries in Ireland, Scotland and northern England, and in continental monasteries associated with Irish or English foundations.
The name "Book of Kells" is derived from the Abbey of Kells in Kells, County Meath in Ireland, where it was kept for much of the medieval period.
From Durrow to Kells : the Insular Gospel-books, 650-800.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Book_of_Kells   (5916 words)

  
 Kells, Book of - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Kells, Book of
St Matthew, depicted in the Book of Kells.
The Book of Kells is an 8th or 9th century illuminated gospel book, and is kept in Trinity College Library, Dublin.
8th-century illuminated manuscript of the Gospels produced at the monastery of Kells in County Meath, Ireland.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Kells,+Book+of   (134 words)

  
 Book of Kells - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Book of Kells (less widely known as The Book of Columba) is an ornately illustrated manuscript, produced by Celtic monks around AD It is one of the most lavishly illuminated manuscripts to survive the mediƦval period.
The name "Book of Kells" is derived from the Abbey of Kells in Kells, County Meath in Ireland, where it was kept for much of the mediƦval period.
From Durrow to Kells : the Insular Gospel-books, 650-800.
www.rahway.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Book_of_Kells   (5991 words)

  
 Corvus '02 - Book of Kells
The Book of Kells came to Trinity College, the single constituent college of the University of Dublin, through the agency of Henry Jones, a former scoutmaster general to Cromwell's army in Ireland, and Vice Chancellor of the University, after he became Bishop of Meath in 1661 and, since 1953, has been bound in four volumes.
The Book of Kells is also known as the "Book of Columba", probably because it was written in the monastery of Iona to honour the saint.
If the Book of Kells is in itself a gallery of insular art, it is a gallery with whole wings which remain closed.
members.aol.com /corvusireland/kel.htm   (1309 words)

  
 The Book of Kells
The Book of Kells is one of the most mysterious of art treasures, a mystical testimony to early Irish Christendom.
The Book of Kells was probably created in a scriptorium where the most sophisticated methods of manuscript production were known, as only the most profound technical ability, combined with excellent knowledge on contemporary and historic art, could have created such a wealth of symbolic and mystical illustrations.
The Book of Kells is composed of two volumes, the facsimile itself and a scientific commentary, in a presentation case.
www.thelibraryshop.org /bookofkells.html   (661 words)

  
 The Classic Text: The Bible
The Kells illuminations are distinctive, intricate, and mathematically precise.
The craftsmanship shown in the Book of Kells is a distinctive treatment of sacred text, and the tandem work of scribes and artists in the scriptoria established a permanent place in the iconography of the Bible.
he book remained at Kells throughout the Middle Ages; venerated as a relic it survived Viking plunderings, arsons, and regicides, although it was lost and recovered, and stripped of its ornamented treasure binding by thieves in 1007.
www.uwm.edu /Library/special/exhibits/clastext/clspg002.htm   (408 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Book of Kells
According to tradition, the book is a relic from the time of Columba (d.
This must be the book which the Welshman, Geraldus Cambrensis, saw at Kildare in the last quarter of the twelfth century and which he describes in glowing terms (Topogr.
The most characteristic ornaments of the Book of Kells, as of other illuminated Irish manuscripts of the period, are the closely coiled spirals connected with each other by a number of curves and terminating in the so-called "trumpet pattern".
www.newadvent.org /cathen/08614b.htm   (970 words)

  
 MacCorkill's Scottish-Irish - Book of Kells
The Book of Kells is an ancient Irish.
The book is a large-sized book which shows that it was probably intended to be an altar-book.
The contents of the Book of Kells are: the text of the gospels, the canon-tables,the breves causae (summaries of the gospel), argumenta: (strange collections of lore and legend concerning the evangelists), and lists of Hebrew names with interpretations.
www.geocities.com /sconemac/kells.html   (791 words)

  
 The Book of Kells   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Experts are uncertain where the Book of Kells was first begun, but evidence points to the Isle of Iona, which was the center of St. Columba's influence and the home of his church.
The Book of Kells remained in the monastery at Kells until 1541, when the Roman Catholic Church took it for protection.
The book is resplendent with artwork, covering almost all the styles known at the time.
www.irishclans.com /articles/bookofkells.html   (572 words)

  
 EU.gif   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Psalter-hours and books of hours - the personal prayer books of the noble, wealthy and educated - are amongst the most richly illuminated books of the late Middle Ages.
The manuscripts for The Book of Kells and the Art of Illumination have been geographically categorised by either where they were made or where they were commissioned.
These books were made for use in the Mass, as was the Book of Kells.
www.nga.gov.au /kells/EuMap/Eu.htm   (1238 words)

  
 Book of Kells   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The book of Kells is one of the most beautiful illuminated manuscripts of the Western World.
The Book of Kells is a Latin text of the four Gospels of Jesus Christ, calligraphed in very ornate script and lavishly illustrated in as many as ten colors; only two of the 680 pages are with out color.
The Book of Kells is a sacred work of art designed to be placed on the alter, for very special occasions only, it was never intended for daily use or study.
www.sheilascelticwisdom.com /oneup/kells.html   (461 words)

  
 Book of Kells
The Book of Kells, of which our copy is a replica, was written more than 1,200 years ago by monks in medieval Ireland.
The Book of Kells derives its name from the Irish village of Kells, located northwest of Dublin, where the book was kept in the monastery for several hundred years.
In 1661 the Book of Kells was transferred from Kells to the Trinity College Library in Dublin, where it has been safeguarded ever since.
www.hackleylibrary.org /kells.htm   (506 words)

  
 The Book of Kells - About Trinity College College - Trinity Information - Trinity College Dublin | Coláiste na ...
The Book of Kells is the centrepiece of an exhibition which attracts over 500,000 visitors to Trinity College Dublin each year.
The gospels are preceded by prefaces, summaries of the gospel narratives and concordances of gospel passages compiled in the fourth century by Eusebius of Caesarea.
Françoise Henry, The Book of Kells: reproductions from the manuscript in Trinity College Dublin with a study of the manuscript (London: Thames and Hudson, 1974; New York: Alfred A Knopf, 1977)
www.tcd.ie /info/trinity/bookofkells   (466 words)

  
 Book of Kells   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Book of Kells is an early Irish 8th to 9th century illustrated manuscript originating at Iona and completed at the Irish monastery of Kells.
The book is a beautiful example of Irish illuminated manuscripts possessing colourful and complex decorations that would take a lifetime to properly study.
The contents of the book are: the text of the four gospels: Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, the Canon-Tables, the Breves Causae (summaries of the gospel), Argumenta (strange collection of lore and legend concerning the evangelists), and lists of Hebrew names with interpretations.
free.hostdepartment.com /I/Iolar/Book_of_Kells.html   (594 words)

  
 UBC Rare Books and Special Collections - Book of Kells
The Book of Kells is one of the masterpieces of Western art and a symbol of Irish nationalism.
On display for many years in the Fine Arts Library, it is currently in Rare Books and Special Collections in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, in its own case, which itself is a replica of a monk's desk from the middle ages.
The Book of Kells is a copy of the four Gospels in Latin.
www.library.ubc.ca /spcoll/kells.html   (266 words)

  
 Visipix: The Book of Kells   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Book of Kells was written and painted 1200 years ago by Irish monks.
Although it’s said that it was begun on the island of Iona, between Scotland and Ireland, its name is derived from the Abbey of Kells, in the Irish Midlands, where it was kept from at least the 9th century to 1541.
Since 1661 the Book of Kells is being kept in the Old Library (http://www.tcd.ie/Library/oldlib.htm) of the Trinity College in Dublin.
www.visipix.com /sites/specials/book_of_kells/bok_start.htm   (446 words)

  
 Lingua Franca - 11/3/2000: The Making Of The Book Of Kells...
In 1654, with Cromwell's cavalry quartered in the church of Kells, the Book of Kells was sent for safety to Dublin.
Bernard Muir: The Book of Kells is one of the great masterpieces that has come down to us from a period often referred to as the Dark Ages.
This program has been incorporated into the Book of Kells exhibition in order to show how multimedia can be of service to the study of ancient manuscripts, and how it can transform the way in which readers and viewers experience objects from the past.
www.abc.net.au /rn/arts/ling/stories/s111811.htm   (1646 words)

  
 Trinity College Library, Dublin - The Book of Kells
But the Book of Kells was not a work for day-to-day use; it is thought to have been altar furniture used for special occasions.
If the Book of Kells is a testament to the artistry and faith of its creators, the Long Room (immediately upstairs from the exhibit) is a testament to the secular worship of learning: it is a cathedral of the book.
Some 200,000 of the oldest books in the library's collections are held in oak bookcases and shelving, running the length of the room in a series of alcoves on either side, not unlike the side chapels of a baroque church.
www.culturevulture.net /ArtandArch/Trinity.htm   (726 words)

  
 : The Book of Kells, review at WorldSSP.net   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Book of Kells is an illuminated or decorated manuscript of the four Gospels.
Facsimile of the Book of KellsContents The Book of Kells is one of the masterpieces of Western art and a symbol of Irish nationalism.
The Book of KellsIona(?), an Irish monastery on the west coast of Scotland, circa 800 Text in Insular Majuscule Library of Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland) Ms.
www.worldssp.net /webinfo_m.asp?proid=12093   (488 words)

  
 book of kells   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Book of Kells was made around the year 800 a.d in the 8
The Book of Kells is a copy of the four Gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.
In the year 1006 the Book of Kells was stolen, on account of its wrought shrine.
www.d118.s-cook.k12.il.us /South/curriculum/team6c/midages/BookofKells   (215 words)

  
 The Book of Kells
The supreme achievement of Irish Celtic art and one of the world’s pre-eminent examples of illuminated codices, the BOOK OF KELLS is a manuscript deluxe, written and richly adorned for use in the conduct of public worship.
In 1661, the BOOK OF KELLS was presented to the Library of Trinity College, University of Dublin, by the Bishop of Meath, Henry Jones.
Although it was rebound in 1895, the book had, by the mid-twentieth century, become soiled, and the friction of opening and closing it had caused pigment damage, particularly on frequently exhibited pages.
www.liu.edu /cwis/cwp/library/sc/kells/kells.htm   (1230 words)

  
 Book of Kells
Fredericton, N.B. The facsimile edition of the Book of Kells is the culmination of a ten year project between the Fine Art Facsimile Publisher of Switzerland and Trinity College, Dublin.
Scholars date the book to approximately 800 A.D. Although Iona and Northumbria are still discussed as possible "birth" places for the manuscript, its final residence was Kells, located thirty miles north west of Dublin.
It is with this monastery that the book is associated.
www.lib.unb.ca /archives/kells/kellsweb.html   (510 words)

  
 The Book of Kells: An Illustrated Introduction to the Manuscript in Trinity College Dublin - zonExplorer
The first facsimile of the Book of Kells was published in 1974, and although this book only advertises itself as 'an illustrated introduction to the manuscript...' it contains good color plates of many of the most famous pages, e.g.
Author, Bernard Meehan, the current Keeper of Manuscripts at Trinity College states that "the sacred text itself was copied in the Book of Kells with a remarkable degree of inaccuracy." It consists of the Latin text of the Gospels, illuminated in the very ornate Hiberno-Saxon style ('Hiberno' refers to the Irish, or Hibernians).
This is 'The Book of Kells,' an ornately illuminated rendition of the four gospels, rendered sometime in the Ninth Century.
www.celtic-one-design.com /php/0500277907.htm   (887 words)

  
 The Book of Kells (1990 facsimile)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Book of Kells is a Gospel Book, which means that it contains the full text of the four Gospels, preceded by some traditional introductory materials.
Such books were usually elaborately illuminated in the early Middle Ages; this one is especially ornate.
First, a special device was invented for the sole purpose of photographing the Book of Kells, which because of its fragility could neither be unbound nor pressed under glass for the purpose of taking photographs.
www.nd.edu /~medvllib/facsintro/kells90.html   (397 words)

  
 The Book of Kells and the Art of Illumination   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
'The Book of Kells is a masterpiece of medieval art - a brilliantly decorated copy of the four Gospels with illustrations of Christ, the Virgin and Child and the Evangelists, and a wealth of smaller decorative painting that does not always relate to the sacred text.
The exhibition places The Book of Kells within the history of book illumination and examines its significance as an expression of the Christian faith.
The Symposium brings leading scholars to explore the iconography of The Book of Kells in the setting of cultural developments in Ireland and Europe.
www.nga.gov.au /kells   (858 words)

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