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Topic: Boston accent phonology


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In the News (Tue 22 Jan 19)

  
  Boston accent - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Boston accent is the dialect of English not only of the city of Boston itself, but more generally of all of eastern Massachusetts; it shares much in common with the accents of New Hampshire and upper Maine.
The internationally best-known user of the Boston accent was probably John Fitzgerald Kennedy.
Boston shares this system with the accents of the southern part of the Midwest.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Boston_accent_phonology   (994 words)

  
 Boston accent - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
The Boston accent is characteristic not only of the city of Boston itself, but more generally of all of eastern Massachusetts.
It shares much in common with the accents of New Hampshire and Maine; the three regions are frequently grouped together by sociolinguists under the cover term Eastern New England accent, which, together with New York-New Jersey English, forms a part of Northeastern American English.
In the most traditional and old-fashioned Boston accents, what is in other dialects [ɔr] becomes a low back vowel [ɒ;]: corn is [kɒːn], pronounced the same or almost the same as con.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Boston_accent_phonology   (919 words)

  
 Search Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Boston terrier Boston terrier, breed of small, lively nonsporting dog developed in the United States in the second half of the 19th cent.
Boston Mountains Boston Mountains, most rugged part of the Ozarks, NW Ark. and E Okla., rising to 2,700 ft (823 m).
Boston Latin School Boston Latin School, at Boston; opened 1635 as a school for boys; one of the oldest free public schools in the United States.
www.encyclopedia.com /search.asp?target=Boston+accent+phonology&rc=10&fh=22&fr=11   (500 words)

  
 Phonology   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Phonology (Greek phone = voice/sound and logos = word/speech), or phonemics, is a subfield of grammar (see also linguistics).
This is one reason why most people have an accent when they attempt to speak a language that they did not grow up hearing; their brains sort the sounds they hear in terms of the phonemes of their own native language.
Government Phonology, which originated in the early 1980s as an attempt to unify theoretical notions of syntactic and phonological structures, is based on the notion that all languages necessarily follow a small set of principles and vary according to their selection of certain binary parameters.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/P/Phonology.htm   (1343 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Boston accent phonology
In the most traditional and old-fashioned Boston accents, what is in other dialects Or` becomes a low back vowel Q : corn is kQ:n, pronounced the same or almost the same as con.
Some older Boston speakers—the ones who have a low vowel in words like corn kQ:n —maintain a distinction between horse and for on the one hand and hoarse and four on the other hand.
A feature that some Boston English speakers share with Received Pronunciation is the so-called Broad A: in some words that in other accents have {, such as half and bath, that vowel is replaced with a: : ha:f, ba:T.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Boston-accent-phonology   (751 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Boston English
Eastern New England English (also called "Boston English", "New England English", or "Northeastern [American] Coastal English") is a [sub-]dialect of American English generally spoken by people living in coastal Maine and New Hampshire, Eastern Massachusetts, and parts of Rhode Island.
Alternative meanings: Boston (disambiguation) The 18th-century Old State House in Boston is surrounded by tall buildings of the 19th and 20th centuries.
Especially in the Boston area, the word "wicked" is used as an intensifying adverb.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Boston-English   (1513 words)

  
 Trap-bath split - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The presence or absence of this split is one of the most noticeable differences between different accents of English English.
In some West Country accents of English English where the vowel in trap is realized as [a] rather than [æ], the vowel in the bath words was lengthened to [aː] and did not merge with the /ɑː/ of father.
Most accents of American English and Canadian English are unaffected by the split.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Broad_A   (716 words)

  
 American English - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
The accents of eastern New England, including those of Boston (see Boston accent), New Hampshire, and Maine (also called Down East), are characterized by a number of phenomena that distinguish them from General American (GenAm).
It is one of the few coastal accents that is rhotic, and one of the first to merge the historical [oɹ] of hoarse, mourning with the [ɔɹ] of horse, morning.
One of the most detailed phonetic depictions of an extreme "yat" accent of the early 20th century is found in the speech of the character Krazy Kat in the comic strip of the same name by George Herriman.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/American_English   (5608 words)

  
 American English - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
It is sometimes claimed that certain rural areas in North America speak "Elizabethan English," and there may be some truth to this, but the standard American English of the upper Midwest has a sound profile much closer to seventeenth century English than contemporary speech in England.
The distinctive speech of important cultural centers like Boston, Massachusetts (see Boston accent phonology), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Charleston, South Carolina, and New Orleans, Louisiana imposed their marks on the surrounding areas.
President John F. Kennedy spoke in the accent associated with the Boston Irish, while President Jimmy Carter speaks with a Southern coastal dialect.
open-encyclopedia.com /American_English   (2185 words)

  
 Boston English
An earmark of Boston English is its r-lessness (or "r-dropping"), a pattern in which syllable-final /r/ is not pronounced.
A more accurate description of rhoticity in Boston English must acknowledge that even though syllable-final /r/ is dropped, it is still somehow "visible." That is, it leaves its mark in one of several ways.
An interesting property of Boston English (one that it shares with varieties like that of New York) is that the r of these words has less of an altering effect on surrounding vowels than it does in other dialects.
www.ic.arizona.edu /~lsp/Northeast/BostonEnglish/bosphon.html   (686 words)

  
 Gender and Name Phonology   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Such correlations between name phonology and referent gender violate the general assumption in linguistics that word sound is arbitrarily related to word function (Pinker, 1994).
To determine whether frequency varied significantly with the gender and phonology factors, name frequencies were recorded from Francis and Kucera (1984) and the natural log values submitted to a 2 X 2 analysis of variance.
Since most people are not explicitly aware of the correlations between person gender and name phonology, their implicit knowledge of these relations could provide an efficient and surreptitious way to probe the automatic activation of gender stereotypes and their effects on person perception.
www.sas.upenn.edu /~kellym/genderNames.html   (16458 words)

  
 Computing Papers on Accent   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Experiments are presented for the recognition of Lancashire and Yorkshire Accented speech using a recognizer trained on London and South East England speakers.
Accent, boundary, none) for each syllable in an utterance based on local and global context (e.g.
Greek is a stress Accent language in which stress is acoustically manifested as total amplitude (Arvaniti, 1991; Arvaniti, 1994; Arvaniti, subm.).
computing.breinestorm.net /Accent   (2954 words)

  
 Neowin.net > Learning American Accent?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
General American is the name given to the accent used by most TV network announcers and is typical of speech in the Midwest, especially Iowa and adjacent parts of Illinois and Nebraska.
General American makes a good reference accent, and a good goal for foreigners learning American English, because it is generally regarded as a "neutral" accent (when most Americans say someone "doesn't have an accent" they mean he or she has a General American accent).
The thing i've noticed about other accents as opposed to american accents is that the american accent tends to not stress all the vowels completely--like some of them are "droned" off.
www.neowin.net /forum/lofiversion/index.php/t326881.html   (2294 words)

  
 Your Accent! | Antimoon Forum   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Being interested in phonology, dialectology and linguistics in general I think all accents are interesting, and truly feel annoying accents aren't necessarily an accent-wide thing but can be chalked up to individuals (if I think of an accent I across the board don't like I'll make an addendum to this message).
For Americans a Southern accent is probably most stigmatized on a national level, and while people may truly believe they don't like it for esthetic reasons only, you'd think that if people judged on esthetic reasons only that there'd be much more variation in terms of the accents Americans dislike the most.
They may perceive a rural Southern US accent and, say, a Pacific Northwest accent as having a few differences, but may not be aware of the associated social statuses associated with each one.
www.antimoon.com /forum/t523-0.htm   (966 words)

  
 Phonology   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Phonology (Greek phone = voice/sound and logos = word/speech), or phonemics, is a subfield of linguistics closely associated with phonetics.
Whereas phonetics is about the physical production and perception of sounds in any language, phonology describes the way sounds function within a given language.
Kaisse, Ellen M.; and Shaw, Patricia A. On the theory of lexical phonology.
www.pillscatalog.net /Phonology.html   (1568 words)

  
 ilani ilani: Boston Accent
On the Fox 25 news right now, Dr. Dennis Becker from The Speech Improvement Co. is discussing a contest for "the worst Boston accent" that Brigham's put on.
I am a native speaker of the boston dialect and I have been caught with the /r/ at the end of utterances, as in "I like pizzar".
It sounds to me as though Shawn and speakers like him are trying to correct their speech in the direction of the U.S. standard, with its /r/s, but because their own dialect doesn't tell them which words should have an /r/ and which shouldn't, they get it wrong.
bridgetsamuels.com /blog/2005/02/boston-accent.htm   (381 words)

  
 Phonology (from Romance languages) --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Some important phonological developments, such as the loss of the system of contrasting vowel lengths and the strengthening of the stress accent, must have occurred during the Vulgar Latin period, while some degree of unity still existed among the various Romance dialects.
It had antecedents in many prose works from classical antiquity (the so-called Greek romances), but as a distinctive genre it was developed in the context of the aristocratic courts of such patrons as Eleanor of Aquitaine.
a six-line verse stanza common in metrical romances in which the first, second, fourth, and fifth lines have four accents each and the third and sixth lines have three accents each and in which the rhyme scheme is aabaab.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-74722   (758 words)

  
 Diphthong - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Diphthongs in the General American accent of English:
The latter three diphthongs also occur in the Boston accent.
As there are no IPA symbols for semivocalic [e] and [o], in the following list the reversed circumflex accent was used to mark all semivowels.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Diphthong   (470 words)

  
 American accent
Her accent is so dreadful that Higgins sees a challenge and accepts a wager with Pickering that he can teach her sufficiently to pass her off as royalty.
In the working-class ("common") accents throughout England, ‘h’ dropping at the beginning of certain words is heard often, but it’s certainly heard more in Cockney, and in accents closer to Cockney on the continuum between that and RP.
In Boston, the ordinal number after "second" is pronounced, roughly, "thihd." Try saying it as if you meant to pronounce the R but then thought better of it.
aaaarmstrong.blogspot.com   (3180 words)

  
 What is phonology
Phonology is that branch of linguistics which studies the sound system of languages.
GA is a ‘negative’ accent, defined as much by a lack of striking features that characterise some of the regional accents as by the presence of specific identifying features
Other well-known American accents include: the Southern accent (with pin and pen pronounced alike, buy pronounced bah, no ‘r’ sound in car, etc.); the Black English accent (them pronounced dim, something pronounced somefin, buy pronounced bah, no ‘r’ sound in car, etc.); the New York accent and the Boston accent.
courses.nus.edu.sg /course/elltankw/history/Phon/A.htm   (1169 words)

  
 Armstrong world
The term, accent, is often incorrectly used in its place, but an accent refers only to the way words are pronounced, while a dialect has its own grammar, vocabulary, syntax, and common expressions as well as pronunciation rules that make it unique from other dialects of the same language.
In some accents of English underlying /h/ is often realised as zero, or sometimes as a glottal stop.
If considering the enormous size of the territory over which it spoken, their accents are practically indistinguishable and tend to be a matter of urban versus rural.
armstrongmetalmania.blogspot.com   (9255 words)

  
 American English   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Traditionally, these accents (with the exception of Martha's Vineyard) are non-rhotic, but this feature is slowly losing ground, especially with the vowel.
The distinction between the vowels of horse and hoarse is maintained in traditional non-rhotic New England accents as (with the same vowel as cot and caught) vs..
It is one of the few coastal accents that is rhotic, and one of the first to merge the historical of hoarse, mourning with the of horse, morning.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/A/American-English.htm   (5510 words)

  
 Irish phonology from LiveJournal   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
All three seem to be good, but I'm afraid of Los Angeles, and I'm also afraid that MIT might be too overrun with the mighty power of Chomsky for my...
phonology, grammar, exegesis, and logic, are of a linguistico-logical nature, and can thus be compared with the Trivium; while two, viz.
didn't really mind getting handed a B+ in phonology, but i was hoping for something better than an A- in Irish, god, i sound whiny, but, i dunno.
www.ljseek.com /search/Irish%20phonology   (773 words)

  
 Boston english - APU Academic Office - News
Learn English, French, German or Spanish in England, Ireland, Europe, Madrid, Sydney, Boston and San Diego OISE is recognised by the British Council and
The Received Pronunciation of England, like Boston English, A feature that some Boston English speakers share with Received Pronunciation is the
Though the Boston movement began under the auspices of the Gainsville, Succinctly stated, "The Boston Church of Christ teaches that when one initially
www.hunt-home.com /hh/boston-english.html   (257 words)

  
 physics - Cot-caught merger   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
According to the Telsur Project of William Labov and others, the merger does not generally occur in the southern United States, along the American side of the Great Lakes region, or in the "Northeast Corridor" extended metropolitan region from New York City to Baltimore.
It occurs in most forms of Canadian English west of Quebec, in the Boston, Massachusetts area and northern New England (see Boston accent), and in the eastern Ohio River valley.
Another dialect survey, in which subjects did not necessarily live in the same city where they were born and where their parents grew up, indicates that there are speakers of both merging and contrast-preserving accents throughout the country.
www.physicsdaily.com /physics/Cot-caught_merger   (726 words)

  
 American English explained   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
This change is nearly universal in North American English, occurring almost everywhere except for parts of north-east New England, like Boston (see Boston accent phonology.
This is the so-called cot-caught merger, where cot and caught are homophones.
President John F. Kennedy spoke in the accent associated with the Boston Irish, while President Jimmy Carter speaks with a Southern coastal accent.
www.wordspider.net /am/american-english.html   (2121 words)

  
 Ling 001 Lecture 2: Phonetics/Phonology
While our discussion will range back and forth somewhat between the two subdisciplines, we will essentially be progressing from the nuts and bolts mechanics of speech sounds through their classification and representation and on to their systematic organization within a given language.
The study of phonology is largely the investigation of alternations like this -- what changes occur, what sounds undergo them, and in what contexts.
An interesting question to ask is why it should be as it is. In this last section we will consider this issue and see that the phonology of human language is an ingenious solution to a serious problem.
www.ling.upenn.edu /courses/Summer_2004/ling001/lecture2.html   (5773 words)

  
 American English Article, AmericanEnglish Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
It is sometimes claimed that certain rural areasin North America speak " Elizabethan English," and theremay be some truth to this, but the standard American English of the upper Midwest has a sound profile much closer to seventeenth century English than contemporary speech in England.
The distinctive speech of important cultural centers like Boston, Massachusetts (see Boston accent phonology), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Charleston, South Carolina, and New Orleans, Louisiana imposed their marks on the surroundingareas.
A distinctive speech pattern was also generated by the separationof Canada from the United States, centered on the Great Lakes region.
www.anoca.org /british/north/american_english.html   (2097 words)

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