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Topic: Brachiopod


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In the News (Wed 20 Jun 18)

  
  Brachiopod showcase
Brachiopods are marine animals living on the sea bottom.
Brachiopods have two valves which are different when seen from the side of the animal.
Brachiopods are attached to the substrate by the muscular pedicle.
www.toyen.uio.no /palmus/galleri/montre/english/m_brachiopod_e.htm   (0 words)

  
  Liberty Formation, Wooster Paleontological Study (Fall 2000)
Brachiopods have survived from the Early Cambrian to the present and live in exclusively marine to brackish waters, but due to the Permian extinction, strophomenids slowly declined until their extinction in the Triassic.
This is an articulate brachiopod that is distinguished by the irregular concentric wrinkles and by the sharp flexture in the shell near the anterior margin.
The lophophore is the brachiopod's organ for feeding.
www.wooster.edu /geology/Geo250/PaleoFTL.html   (2155 words)

  
  Brachiopod   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Brachiopods (Brachiopoda) are one of the major animal phyla.
Brachiopods are always marine and are found either attached to hard substrates by a structure called a pedicle or resting on muddy bottoms.
Brachiopods are filter feeders with a distinctive feeding organ called a lophophore, found among the various different groups of lophophorate s.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Brachiopod.html   (0 words)

  
 [No title]
Each brachiopod valve is bilaterally symmetrical from the center of the hinge to the point of the shell opening opposite to the hinge.
The brachiopod is distinguished by an organ that is used to anchor it to the ocean floor.
Brachiopods have a simple nervous system and are able to open and close their shells to feed or to escape predators.
www.drydredgers.org /brach01.htm   (1396 words)

  
 Brachiopoda
The brachiopods are a large group of solitary and exclusively marine organisms with a very good geologic history throughout most of the Phanerozoic and are among the most successful benthic macroinvertebrates of the Paleozoic.
Brachiopods differ in many ways from bryozoans (in both soft and hard-part morphology), and are thus considered by most workers as a separate but closely related phylum.
However, one of the most distinguishing features of brachiopods is the presence of a pedicle, a fleshy stalk-like structure that aids the animal in burrowing and maintaining stability.
paleo.cortland.edu /tutorial/Brachiopods/brachiopoda.htm   (0 words)

  
 Kentucky’s State Fossil is a brachiopod
Brachiopods are fossil shells, from animals that lived in ancient seas.
Although they resemble clams, brachiopods were a different group of animals.
Because brachiopods can be found in rocks throughout Kentucky, we know that Kentucky was once covered by oceans.
www.uky.edu /KGS/education/didfossil.htm   (0 words)

  
 Falls of the Ohio - Education
Inarticulate brachiopods were the first to develop, and can be found in rocks dating back to the earliest Cambrian period, more than 570 million years ago.
Inarticulate brachiopods open and close their valves with muscles and do not rely on sockets and teeth that are a characteristic of articulate brachiopods.
Most brachiopods are found on the "upper fossil beds," rather than the coral-rich "lower fossil beds." As a result, this group of fossils is visible for much of the year.
www.fallsoftheohio.org /education/Brachiopods.html   (873 words)

  
 500 million years of errors: Brachiopod shells record shadow of arms race in ancient oceans
However, the rare predation traces left on brachiopod shells by unknown assailants coupled with a subtle increase in their frequency through time may be the shadows on the wall that show killers were in the room and their numbers increased with time.
From 550 million years ago until 250 million years ago, brachiopods, or "lampshells," were plentiful in the earth's oceans.
Brachiopods were a common shellfish up until the mass extinction at the end of the Paleozoic that may have killed as much as 95 percent of all marine life.
www.eurekalert.org /pub_releases/2005-06/vt-5my061305.php   (1071 words)

  
 Palaeos Invertebrates: Brachiopoda: Brachiopod origins and classification
The taxonomy of brachiopods is complicated by homeomorphy, or similarity due to convergent evolution.
Articulate brachiopods with variable profile in productids; commonly planar to weakly concavoconvex in strophonmenides.
Articulate brachiopods with biconvex, strophic or astrophic shells articulated by deltidiodont or cyrtomatodont teeth and sockets buttressed by brachiophores.
www.palaeos.com /Invertebrates/Lophotrochozoa/Brachiopoda/classification.html   (757 words)

  
 Fossil brachiopod - Spirifer striata - Virtual Wonders at The Natural History Museum
Brachiopods are often confused with the two-shelled 'sea shell' animals called bivalves found on beaches today; however, they are a completely different group of animals.
There are over 100 genera (groups of species) of brachiopod found in seas all around the world today and their fossil record goes back to the Cambrian, around 560 million years ago.
When the brachiopod was alive the coiled spirals would have been covered in soft tissues and fine tentacles to form an organ called the lophophore which is used for feeding.
www.nhm.ac.uk /nature-online/virtual-wonders/vrshell.html   (179 words)

  
 Big Brook Brachiopod Page
Commonality: Choristothyris is the only brachiopod that is commonly found in moderate numbers in the oyster beds of the Navesink formation at Big Brook.
Size: These brachiopods are usually small, never exceeding 1 to 1.5 cm (about.5 in) long and wide.
In New Jersey, this brachiopod is a fairly good indicator of the Navesink formation.
www.njfossils.net /brachiopod.html   (180 words)

  
 BRACHIOPOD - Definition
brachiopode.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the Brachiopoda, or its shell.
Brachiopod shells come in many different shapes and sizes.
Brachiopods were extremely abundant during the Paleozoic era (both in terms of numbers of individuals and numbers of species), but were practically wiped out around 300 million years ago during the Permian mass extinction.
www.hyperdictionary.com /dictionary/brachiopod   (147 words)

  
 Yale Peabody Museum: Invertebrate Paleontology: Schuchert Brachiopod Collection
The brachiopod collection is the second largest in the nation in volume and in terms of geographic, stratigraphic and taxonomic representation.
Schuchert was president of Geological Society of America and winner of the Penrose Medal (the highest achievement in the society), president of the Paleontological Society, recipient of the Hayden Gold Medal from the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Science, and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1910.
Concurrent with the move, a brachiopod specialist was hired to reorganize the Schuchert Collection according to the revised brachiopod volumes of the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology (Kaesler, ed., 1997, 2000, 2002).
www.peabody.yale.edu /collections/ip/ip_brachio.html   (1004 words)

  
 Chapter 8: Phylum Brachiopoda
While recent brachiopods are a rather rare and insignificant group, their long fossil history shows that they were at times the most prominent animals in the seas.
Brachiopods are solitary, entirely marine animals, each with a shell consisting of two opposing parts (valves) that enclose most of the soft body.
In most brachiopods, the shell is made of calcite, but a few groups have shells made of calcium phosphate with varying amounts of organic material.
www.geo.arizona.edu /geo3xx/geo308_fall2002/4brachiopds.htm   (0 words)

  
 [No title]
Each brachiopod valve is bilaterally symmetrical from the center of the hinge to the point of the shell opening opposite to the hinge.
The brachiopod is distinguished by an organ that is used to anchor it to the ocean floor.
Brachiopods have a simple nervous system and are able to open and close their shells to feed or to escape predators.
drydredgers.org /brach01.htm   (0 words)

  
 GeoKansas--Fossil Brachiopods
The exceptional preservation of the brachiopod fossil in the center of the photo (note the delicate spines still attached to the valve) indicates that the specimen was buried quickly in undisturbed sediments.
Brachiopods are one of most common fossils found in the Pennsylvanian rocks in eastern Kansas.
Because of their worldwide abundance, diversity, and rapid evolution in the Paleozoic, brachiopod fossils are useful indicators of the ages of different rock layers.
www.kgs.ku.edu /Extension/fossils/brachiopod.html   (0 words)

  
 Ancient Life--26--Vocabulary
One valve of a brachiopod is rounded outward outward as the surface of a ball, and the other valve is depressed inward as a bowl.
The dorsal valve of brachiopods is the brachial valve; dorsal in clams is toward the hinge.
Articulate brachiopods with concavo-convex shells, commonly having spines and inconspicuous interareas.
www.kgs.ku.edu /Publications/ancient/vocab.html   (0 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Brachiopods just are not as sexy as vertebrates, but bear with me for a moment.
For many years, I have been familiar with an usual brachiopod from the Permian that is particularly common at localities in the fossil reefs of the Glass Mountains of Texas.
They are as weird as an example of brachiopods as bats or whales are as examples of mammals.
www.geo.ucalgary.ca /~macrae/t_origins/to_trans_brachiopod02.net   (0 words)

  
 Kentucky State Fossil   (Site not responding. Last check: )
With the ubiquity of brachiopod species found in the Paleozoic sediments of the state, it would be difficult to decide which was the most common or important.
The upper and lower shells of a brachiopod are different from each other but both bilaterally symmetrical, whereas those of a clam are both the same (the plane of symmetry passes between the shells of a clam, through them in a brachiopod).
This is known because a few brachiopods survive in the deep oceans today, although their numbers and diversity were decimated in the great extinction at the end of the Paleozoic.
www.statefossils.com /ky/ky.html   (0 words)

  
 Brachiopod Fossils
Brachiopods are solitary animals that build hard shells.
Despite a resemblance to clams, brachiopods are not related to those animals.
It is easy to tell the difference between the two kinds of animals: the shells of clams are alike in size, shape and appearance, while the shells of brachiopods are different in size, shape and appearance.
www.ohiohistorycentral.org /entry.php?rec=1337   (0 words)

  
 500 Million Years of Errors: Brachiopod Shells Record Shadow of Arms Race in Ancient Oceans - Science - RedOrbit   (Site not responding. Last check: )
However, the rare predation traces left on brachiopod shells by unknown assailants coupled with a subtle increase in their frequency through time may be the shadows on the wall that show killers were in the room and their numbers increased with time.
Brachiopods were a common shellfish up until the mass extinction at the end of the Paleozoic that may have killed as much as 95 percent of all marine life.
While many previous researchers studied drilled brachiopods at numerous sites, and there have also been extensive studies on mollusks in the more recent fossil record, this is the first comprehensive study of predation on brachiopods across the entire Paleozoic Era.
www.redorbit.com /news/display/?id=156666&source=r_science   (0 words)

  
 Brachiopod Fossils From The Ordovician Period
The brachiopods are marine to brackish water bivalves which still exist today although in greatly reduced numbers.
The brachiopods were at their peak during the Ordovician.
The brachiopods found today are found only in very cold water or in very deep water and so don't appear to be common.
members.wri.com /jeffb/Fossils/Brachiopoda.shtml   (151 words)

  
 Brachiopod Classification
More recently there is argument over whether this is the best system with which to classify brachiopods.
Today this is the most abundant of the brachiopods.
This group was the largest of the brachiopods with over 400 genera.
www.fossils-facts-and-finds.com /brachiopod.html   (395 words)

  
 Fossil
The wavy area may be a part of a brachiopod too...Allen A. Probably all the fossils enclosed in the rock (sandstone?) are brachiopods, of various groups.
Probably all the fossils enclosed in the rock (sandstone?) are brachiopods, of various groups.
Brachiopods are the most common Paleozoic fossil as they are very numerous in species, occur together in large numbers, are most likely to be preserved and lived in a wide variety of environments...
www.manandmollusc.net /Mystery_shell_pages/art-mystery.html   (0 words)

  
 Brachiopod notes
Brachiopods were a diverse and ubiquitous group of benthic organisms during the Paleozoic.
They are often given the briefest of treatments by biologists because of their subsequent decline to the present (they never recovered from being decimated at the end of the Permian).
Later brachiopods were able to modify the geometry around the pedical foramen (thus the terms) and shifted the pedical opening to the pedical valve; modern terebratulids reabsorb shell around the foramen to enlarge the opening as needed.
www.uwm.edu /People/mtharris/Paleo/RN17.html   (0 words)

  
 Pleuroceras Ammonite and Brachiopod Association
It is found with an attached Brachiopod, a shelled animal which looks like the more familiar bivalves of today: the clams.
The plane of symmetry in a Brachiopod shell passes through the individual shell, while the Bivalvia have a plane of symmetry that passes between the individual shells themselves.
The ridge along the dorsal edge is the remnant of the siphuncule, the means by which the ammonite “shifted ballast” in order to rise and fall in the water column.
www.fossilmuseum.net /Fossil_Galleries/Ammonites/Pleuroceras/Ammo16.htm   (227 words)

  
 labtest2
Describe both specimens concisely, and say which one is the bivalve, which one the brachiopod, and which character(s) of the specimen you used to make that decision.
Describe each concisely, and say which one is the brachiopod, which one the bivalve, and why you made that decision.
The shells present were Brachiopods (of various different species), and in some the small remains of the support for the lophophore could be seen.
ethomas.web.wesleyan.edu /wescourses/2004s/ees227/01/labtest2.htm   (0 words)

  
 Yale Peabody Museum: Invertebrate Paleontology: Schuchert Brachiopod Collection
The brachiopod collection is the second largest in the nation in volume and in terms of geographic, stratigraphic and taxonomic representation.
Schuchert was president of Geological Society of America and winner of the Penrose Medal (the highest achievement in the society), president of the Paleontological Society, recipient of the Hayden Gold Medal from the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Science, and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1910.
Concurrent with the move, a brachiopod specialist was hired to reorganize the Schuchert Collection according to the revised brachiopod volumes of the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology (Kaesler, ed., 1997, 2000, 2002).
www.yale.edu /peabody/collections/ip/ip_brachio.html   (0 words)

  
 An Articulate Brachiopod   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This is a picture of an on-site brachiopod with a hammer head for scale.
Brachiopods are one of the most common fossil types found in the Glenerie formation.
This particular brachiopod is an articulate brachiopod, possibly of the genera Dolerorthis.
www.sas.upenn.edu /earth/geol205/pic2.html   (0 words)

  
 Cretaceous Fossils of Delaware - Phylum Brachiopoda
Brachiopods are shelled invertebrate that look somewhat like bivalved molluscs.
Like clams, the brachiopod lives in a shell consisting of two hinged valves, but the orientation of the shells is different.
Brachiopods have valves covering the top and bottoms of the animal that are of different sizes and shapes, but the left and right sides are are symmetrical (or mirror images to each other).
www.udel.edu /dgs/Paleontology/DE_K_pal/palpages/Brachiopoda.html   (0 words)

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