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Topic: Brahmic family


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  Brahmic family - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Brahmic family is a family of abugidas (writing systems) used in South Asia, Southeast Asia, Tibet, Mongolia, Manchuria, and to an extent, Korea.
Brahmic scripts are descended from the Brāhmī script of ancient India, which according to one theory, descended from a Semitic script
Many languages using Brahmic scripts are sometimes written in Latin script, primarily for the benefit of non-native speakers or for use in computer software without support for said scripts, but these practices have made little headway in South Asia itself.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Brahmic_family   (640 words)

  
 Brahmic family   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Brahmic scripts are ultimately descended from the script for ancient Sanskrit.
The most prominent member of the family is Devanagari, which is used to write several languages in India, as well as Nepal, including both Indic languages and Dravidian languages.
Burmese, Cambodian and Thai are also written in Brahmic scripts, though with considerable modification to suit their phonology.
bopedia.com /en/wikipedia/b/br/brahmic_family.html   (215 words)

  
 Abugida
In many of the Brahmic scripts, a syllable beginning with a cluster is treated as a single character for purposes of vowel marking, so a vowel marker like ि ''-i,'' falling before the character it modifies, may appear several positions before the place where it is pronounced.
In the family of abugidas known as Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics, vowels are indicated by modification (rotation and reflection) of the akshara.
For example, the Meroitic script of ancient Sudan did not indicate an inherent ''a'' (one symbol stood for both ''m'' and ''ma,'' for example), and is thus similar to Brahmic family abugidas.
www.destination-luxury.com /encyclopedia/entry/abugida   (1155 words)

  
 Abugida - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Some abugidas, notably the Brahmic scripts, are thought to have evolved from alphabetic abjad scripts.
Some abugidas, especially those in the Brahmic family of scripts, feature a mark called a halant or (in Sanskrit) virama, which suppresses a character's inherent vowel, reducing it to a lone consonant.
The largest single group of abugidas is the Brahmic family of scripts, however, which includes nearly all the scripts used in India and Southeast Asia.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Abugida   (467 words)

  
 Brahmic family
The Brahmic family is a family of abugidas used in India and Indochina.
The most prominent member is Devanagari, which is used to write several languages in India.
The term "Nagari" is sometimes used for those Brahmic scripts that are used to write Indic languages, or as short for "Devanagari".
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/br/Brahmic_family.html   (133 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Burmese language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Burmese is part of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages, in the sub family of Tibeto-Burman languages.
Written Burmese is derived from the Mon script, and is part of the Brahmic family.
The characters are rounded, because of the fact that words were written on palm leaves, and round letters were easier to write.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Burmese_language   (626 words)

  
 Urdu Encyclopedia Article @ QuiltPlace.com (Quilt Place)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Urdū (اُردو) is an Indo-European language of the Indo-Aryan family that developed under Persian, Turkish, Arabic, Hindi, and Sanskrit influence in South Asia during the Delhi Sultanate and Mughal Empire (1200-1800).
Taken by itself, Urdū is approximately the twentieth most populous natively spoken language in the world, and is the national language of Pakistan as well as one of the 23 national languages of India.
Urdū is a member of the Indo-Aryan family of languages (i.e., those languages descending from Sanskrit), which is in turn a branch of the Indo-Iranian group (which comprises the Indo-Aryan and the Iranian branches), which itself is a member of the Indo-European linguistic family.
www.quiltplace.com /encyclopedia/Urdu   (6577 words)

  
 abugida Information Center - abugida
An abugida or alphasyllabary is a writing system composed of signs (graphemes) denoting consonants with an inherent following vowel, which are consistently modified to indicate other vowels (or, in some cases, the lack of a vowel).
In many of the Brahmic scripts, a syllable beginning with a cluster abugida is treated as a single character for purposes of vowel marking, so a vowel marker like ि-i, falling before the character it modifies, may appear several postions before the place where it is pronounced.
The largest family of abugidas, however, is the Brahmic family of scripts, which includes nearly all the scripts used in India and Southeast Asia.
www.scipeeps.com /Sci-Linguistic_Topics_A_-_Co/abugida.html   (656 words)

  
 Burmese Translation Services - Translators English/Burmese
Burmese is a closet relative of the Sino-Tibetan family of which Chinese (also know as Sinitic) is a member.
Related languages and dialects spoken in China, as well as many hundreds of languages from the Tibeto-Burman group, can be found as far east as Vietnam and as far west as Pakistan.
Burmese is written in the Burmese script, a member of the Brahmic family that exhibits an unusual circular-looking appearance.
www.greentranslations.com /burmese-translation.html   (226 words)

  
 Brāhmī - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the ancient Indian family of scripts.
Brāhmī refers to the pre-modern members of the Brahmic family of scripts.
The best known inscriptions in Brāhmī are the rock-cut edicts of Ashoka, dating to the 3rd century BC.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Brahmi   (763 words)

  
 Abugida
Examples of abugidas include the various scripts of the Brahmic family, Ethiopic Ge'ez, and Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics.
In the family of abugidas known as Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics, vowels are indicated by rotation and / or inversion of the akshara.
Although Ge'ez derived from a different abjad, one theory is that its evolution into an abugida may have been influenced by Christian missionaries from India.
www.danceage.com /biography/sdmc_Abugida   (1241 words)

  
 Brahmi Definition / Brahmi Research
Brahmi refers to the pre-modern members of the Brahmic familyThe Brahmic family is a family of abugidas used in South Asia and Southeast Asia.
The individuals abugidas may be named Brahmic scripts or Indic scripts.
The term Nagari is additionally used for those Brahmic scripts that are used to write Indic languages, though it is further commonly used as a synonym for Devanagari....
www.elresearch.com /Brahmi   (213 words)

  
 Writing system - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
All known abjads (except maybe Tifinagh) belong to the Semitic family of scripts, and derive from the original Northern Linear Abjad.
The reason for this is that Semitic languages and the related Berber languages have a morphemic structure which makes the denotation of vowels redundant in most cases.
Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics can be considered abugidas, although they are rarely thought of in those terms.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Writing_system   (3002 words)

  
 European Burmese
Burmese is a member of the Tibeto-Burman languages, which is a subfamily of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages.
It is spoken by 22 million as a first language, and is spoken as a second language by minorities in Burma, such as the Chinese, Indian, Karen, Mon, and Shan.
The other is street, which is used with family and friends.
www.artistbooking.com /trips/58/european-burmese.html   (1796 words)

  
 Buginese language - Gurupedia
Buginese (locally Basa Ugi, elsewhere also Bahasa Bugis, Bugis, Bugi, De') is the language spoken by about four million people, mainly in the southern part of Celebes (Sulawesi), in Indonesia.
It is an Ergative-absolutive language of the Austronesian language family.
It was traditionally written using the Lontara script, of the Brahmic family, which is also used for the
www.gurupedia.com /b/bu/buginese.htm   (88 words)

  
 BabelStone : 'Phags-pa Script : Description
The 'Phags-pa script belongs to the extensive Brahmic family of scripts, which includes Devanagari and most other Indian scripts, as well as many scripts across South-East Asia, and various historical scripts from Central Asia.
The letters of the 'Phags-pa script are derived directly from the Tibetan script, and many of the letters are very similar, or even identical, to their Tibetan counterparts.
The 'Phags-pa script is unique amongst Brahmic scripts, in that it is written in vertical columns, from top to bottom, laid out left to right across the writing surface.
www.babelstone.co.uk /Phags-pa/Description.html   (5524 words)

  
 Free information of U-96   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Er legte auf seiner Farm das 750 ha große Weingut Constantia (Kapstadt) an und gründete die Siedlung Stellenbosch.
Constantia wurde in der Folgezeit von der Familie Cloete erworben, die auf ihrem Gut ein Produkt von Weltruf erzeugten.
Das jährliche Durchschnittseinkommen eines Haushalts betrug 30.855 US-Dollar, das Durchschnittseinkommen einer Familie belief sich auf 35.585 USD.
www.qcat.org /en/Brahmicfamily   (5813 words)

  
 Edge Translation
The Bangla alphabet has 12 vowels and 52 consonants.
The bangla Script is an Abugida system of writing belonging to the Brahmic family of scripts.
Please click the above box to receive an instant online quotation.
www.edgetranslation.net /bangla1.htm   (299 words)

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