Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Brahmic scripts


Related Topics

  
  Brahmic family
The Brahmic family is a family of abugidas used in India and Indochina.
Burmese[?], Cambodian and Thai are also written in Brahmic scripts, though with considerable modification to suit their phonology.
The term "Nagari" is sometimes used for those Brahmic scripts that are used to write Indic languages, or as short for "Devanagari".
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/br/Brahmic_family.html   (133 words)

  
  Brahmic family   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The Brahmic family is a family of abugidas used in South Asia and Southeast Asia.
Brahmic scripts are descended from the Brahmi script of ancient India, which in turn is believed to be descended from a Semitic script, thus they probably have a common ancestor with the European scripts.
The Siddham script was especially important in Buddhism because many sutras were written in it, and the art of Siddham calligraphy survives today in Japan.
brahmic-family.iqnaut.net   (548 words)

  
 Casino online portal | information about Casino online | Brahmic_family
The Brahmic family is a family of abugidas used in South Asia, Southeast Asia, Tibet, Mongolia, and to an extent, Korea.
Brahmic scripts are descended from the Brāhmī script of ancient India, which in turn is believed to be descended from a Semitic script, thus they probably have a common ancestor with the European scripts.
Many languages using Brahmic scripts are sometimes written in Latin script, primarily for the benefit of non-native speakers or for use in computer software without support for said scripts, but these practices have made little headway in South Asia itself.
www.pokerhomeportal.com /?u=/Brahmic_family   (575 words)

  
 Brahmic family - Wikinfo
The Brahmic family is a family of abugidas used in South Asia and Southeast Asia.
Brahmic scripts are ultimately descended from the script for ancient Sanskrit.
The Siddham script was especially important in Buddhism because many sutras were written in it, and the art of Siddham calligraphy survives today in Japan.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Indic_script   (964 words)

  
 Detailed analysis of scripts
The Indic scripts under consideration do not have any other elements than those mentioned, and a particular script may be said to consist of the set of all its script characters (which in practice is a finite set).
For scripts with case it is useful to distinguish case in script characters, and introduce a category between script characters and script generators, the 'sub-generators'.
is a one-to-one mapping from the script generators of the source script to a subset of either the script generators or the sub-generators of the target script, singly or in ordered combinations, together with the use of the necessary meta-signs.
homepage.ntlworld.com /stone-catend/tr-a1.htm   (949 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Sinhala script   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
It is a modified Brahmic abugida which is composed almost entirely of curlicues.
It is different enough from the other Brahmic scripts that its Unicode page does not match theirs.
The Sinhala script evolved from the ancient Brahmi script, which was introduced to the island in the 6th century BC.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Sinhala-script   (297 words)

  
 Roadmap to the SMP
NOTE: When scripts are actually proposed to the UTC or to WG2, the practice is to "front" them in the zones to which they are tentatively allocated, and to adjust the block size with regard to the allocation proposed.
The size and location of the unallocated script blocks are merely proposals based on the current state of planning.
The size and location of a script may change during final allocation of the script.
www.unicode.org /roadmaps/smp   (336 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Brahmic scripts are descended from the Brāhmī script of ancient India, which according to evangelists, descended from a Semitic script, thus they may have a common ancestor with the European scripts.
The Dravidian languages of southern India have Brahmic scripts with a rounded appearance (like in Telugu), as they were traditionally written on palm leaves, on which straight lines could not easily be formed.
Professor Gari Ledyard has hypothesized that the hangul script used to write Korean is based on the Mongol Phagspa script, a descendant of the Brahmic family via Tibetan.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Indic_script   (659 words)

  
 abugida Information Center - abugida
In many of the Brahmic scripts, a syllable beginning with a cluster abugida is treated as a single character for purposes of vowel marking, so a vowel marker like ि-i, falling before the character it modifies, may appear several postions before the place where it is pronounced.
The Ethiopic script is an abugida, although its vowel modifications are not entirely systematic.
The largest family of abugidas, however, is the Brahmic family of scripts, which includes nearly all the scripts used in India and Southeast Asia.
www.scipeeps.com /Sci-Linguistic_Topics_A_-_Co/abugida.html   (656 words)

  
 BabelStone : 'Phags-pa Script
The 'Phags-pa script is a Brahmic script based on Tibetan that was used for writing Mongolian, Chinese and other languages during the Mongolian Yuan dynasty (1271-1368).
Unlike other Brahmic scripts, 'Phags-pa was written vertically from left to right after the manner of the Uighur-derived Mongolian script.
Overview : Overview of the 'Phags script, comprising a brief history of its rise and fall, and a summary of the extant corpus of texts and inscriptions written in the 'Phags-pa script
www.babelstone.co.uk /Phags-pa/index.html   (455 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Brahmic family
Tamil has far fewer letters than some of the other Indic scripts as it has no separate aspirated or voiced consonants.
Depending on the script, the dependent forms can be either placed to the left of, the right of, above, below, or on both the left and the sides of the base consonant.
Many languages using Brahmic scripts are sometimes written in Latin script, primarily for the benefit of non-native speakers or for use in computer software without support for said scripts, but these practices have made little headway in India itself.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Brahmic_script   (651 words)

  
 Romanisation Encyclopedia Article @ EveryLast.Net (Every Last Net)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
If the romanization attempts to transliterate the original script, the guiding principle is a one-to-one mapping of characters in the source language into the target script, with less emphasis on how the result sounds when pronounced according to the reader's language.
The Brahmic family of abugidas is used for languages of the Indian subcontinent and south-east Asia.
Thai, spoken in Thailand, is written with its own script, probably descended from Old Khmer, in the Brahmic family.
everylast.net /encyclopedia/Romanisation   (2379 words)

  
 Proposal for encoding Sinhala in ISO/IEC 10646
Brahmic encoding should have wide-ranging benefits to the Theravada Buddhist community in Sri Lanka, as regards interchange of texts in the Pali language to other scripts, such as Burmese.
Brahmic encoding would also facilitate the transfer of data from Sinhala script into Tamil script, an acknowledged requirement in Sri Lanka.
Brahmic encoding of the repertoire here is appropriate in the unified context of Brahmic scripts in ISO/IEC 10646 -- and will facilitate software development for the Sinhala script.
www.egt.ie /standards/si/si.html   (552 words)

  
 Abugida - Gurupedia
Some abugidas, notably the Brahmic scripts, are thought to have evolved from alphabetic scripts.
Some abugidas, especially those in the Brahmic family of scripts, feature a mark called a halant or (in Sanskrit) virama, which suppresses a character's inherent vowel, reducing it to a lone consonant.
Many North American Indian scripts, such as Cree syllabary, can be considered abugidas as well, although they are more often referred to as syllabaries.
www.gurupedia.com /a/ab/abugida.htm   (304 words)

  
 Brahmic Unification (was Re: New contribution )
What I would really like to see is individual proposals for some of the major Brahmic scripts.
For example, the excellent description of the Tocharian script (surely the worst made-up name for a dead script ever) at http://titus.fkidg1.uni-frankfurt.de/didact/idg/toch/tochbr.htm could be the basis of a proposal for this important Brahmic script.
It would probably take years to get any sort of consensus on a unified Bramic script proposal, but the issues involved with a single (and in the case of Tocharian fairly uniform) script could be dealt with in a relatively short period of time.
www.mail-archive.com /unicode@unicode.org/msg24022.html   (238 words)

  
 Abugida - Article from FactBug.org - the fast Wikipedia mirror site
Some abugidas, notably the Brahmic scripts, are thought to have evolved from alphabetic abjad scripts.
Many North American Indian scripts, such as Cree syllabics, can be considered abugidas as well, although they are more often referred to as syllabaries.
The largest single group of abugidas is the Brahmic family of scripts, however, which includes nearly all the scripts used in India and Southeast Asia.
www.factbug.org /cgi-bin/a.cgi?a=878   (413 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Handbook of Scripts and Alphabets: Books: George L. Campbell,G. Campbell,Campbell George   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
This is a handy reference to the main scripts and alphabets of the world.
The inclusion of extinct scripts such as the Egyptian hieroglyphs was perhaps intended to give an impression of erudition, but the author based his Middle Egyptian "alphabet" on Budge's 70-year-out-of-date list and contained misread and missing signs.
While it is true that the many scripts derived from India are of interest to linguists, this booklet has such an overall bias on the various forms of Brahmic-derived Indic, Dravidian and Indo-chinese writing systems that one gets the impression this must be the author's area of specialty.
www.amazon.ca /Handbook-Scripts-Alphabets-George-Campbell/dp/0415183448   (612 words)

  
 Abugida   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
About half the writing systems in the world, including the extensive Brahmic system used for most Indo-Aryan languages languages are abugida.
An abugida is to be contrasted with a syllabary, where symbols with similar sounds look nothing like one another, but also to be contrasted with an alphabet proper, where separate symbols are used to denote the consonants and the vowels, although even here some written consonants may acquire vowel characterizations.
There is no basic sign representing the consonant k; rather the unmodified letter क represents the syllable ka; the a is not marked on the symbol, and thus is the so-called inherent vowel.
www.infoforyou.org /input.php?title=Abugida   (1273 words)

  
 BabelStone : 'Phags-pa Script : Description
The 'Phags-pa script was created by the Tibetan monk known as 'Phags-pa (1239-1280) at the behest of Kublai Khan between 1260 and 1269.
The letters of the 'Phags-pa script are derived directly from the Tibetan script, and many of the letters are very similar, or even identical, to their Tibetan counterparts.
As the script is written from top to bottom, vowel signs (such as the signs for i, e and o) that are placed above the preceding consonant in the Tibetan script, are placed below their preceding consonant in the 'Phags-pa script.
www.babelstone.co.uk /phags-pa/Description.html   (5524 words)

  
 | Writing Systems wiki | Typophile
Hangul, on the other hand, although it is written in a way that composes letters (jamo) into syllabic blocks, is an alphabet and not a syllabary, because it is the jamo that are the basic building blocks of the script, not the syllables.
But the Arabic script used to write Kurdish is an alphabet, as is Hebrew used to write Yiddish.
There are much more readers of Hangul than makers of Hangul fonts, a script should first serve its users, and [adult] readers read the “blocks” as whole syllables*; so if I had to choose, I’d list it as a syllabary (with a proper elaboration on its alphabetic aspect).
typophile.com /node/12265   (846 words)

  
 romanization Information Center - romanization
However, most romanizations are intended for the casual reader, who is unfamiliar with the intricacies of the original script and is more interested in pronouncing the source language.
Such romanizations follow the principle of phonological transcription and attempt to render the significant sounds (phonemes) of the original as faithfully as possible in the the romanization of ireland target language.
Today the Latin script (Łacinka, or Łacinica) is rarely used, although it has its advocates.
www.scipeeps.com /Sci-Linguistic_Topics_R_-_T/romanization.html   (1626 words)

  
 IAST - The real meaning from Timesharetalk wikipedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
It is based on a standard established by the Congress of Orientalists at Athens in 1912.
The IAST allows a lossless transliteration of Devanagari (and other Indic scripts, such as Sarada), and as such represents not only the phonemes of Sanskrit, but allows essentially phonetic transcription (e.g.
The National Library at Kolkata romanization, intended for the romanization of all Indic scripts, is an extension of IAST.
www.timesharetalk.co.uk /wiki.asp?k=IAST   (271 words)

  
 Babad Bali - Balinese Languange in Computer Processing
For the readers who are not familiar with the Balinese script, please consult the article The Balinese Alphabet.
All the texts in Balinese script in this article are typed using his fonts and his keyboard input template.
In the Balinese script, the syllable nya, na rambat, ga-gora are the widest one, and the ca, na, ra, da, wa and some other syllable are the thinnest one.
www.babadbali.com /aksarabali/art1-c.htm   (2332 words)

  
 [Esol-news] Fw: [NIFL-ESL:7032] Re: back to hangul
For anyone with knowlege of or access > to hangul script, the symbols for 'n' and 'k' demonstrate this > perfectly: the first depicting the rising of the front of the tongue > to the alveolar ridge and the latter the rising of the back of the > tongue to the velum.
Well, read this exchange: > > > > http://www.cs.colostate.edu/~malaiya/korean.txt > > > > >> As you probably know, both Korean and Katakana (Japanese) > > >> scripts were invented by Buddhist monks to represent > > >> Indian sounds better, hence both of them have some > > >> relationship with Hindi (Devanagari) script.
Secondly > > the credit for having Chinese script largely replaced by Hangul > > goes to the Christian missionaries who found Hangul to be more > > suitable.
cls.coe.utk.edu /pipermail/esol-news/2002-January/000068.html   (616 words)

  
 [No title]
It is designed to be compatible with, and to allow the development of, ISO transliterations for other scripts which share (with Devanagari) a common origin in the Brahmi script.
Devanagari is one of the most widely used scripts in written communications, both in publications (with India being one of the largest book publishers worldwide) and in manuscript collections (with manuscripts in Devanagari script outnumbering those in Greek and Roman script).
Despite changes in the ability of computers to handle most scripts of the world, there are still situations where computer equipment cannot yet handle the full range of characters (e.g.
www.elot.gr /tc46sc2/announce/n401.html   (1358 words)

  
 Asia Finest Discussion Forum > Native Written Language
For example, Javanese has a script decended from the ancient Brahmic scripts of Northern India, and is remotely related to the Devangari script used to write some Indian languages.
Maylay itself may be written in the Arabic script, and I have seen some packaging with it such, but it has largely been superceded by the Roman alphabet.
Oct 25 2004, 07:15 AM beside Javanese Script, as far as i know there are also some other scripts like Buginese/makassarese script, some old script i think was written in ancient javanese script, beside that before indonesian recognise roman script, they also use arab script with some addition to write.
www.asiafinest.com /forum/lofiversion/index.php/t3458.html   (1086 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.