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Topic: Brahui language


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In the News (Sun 21 Jul 19)

  
  Brahui people - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Linguisticly, they speak the Brahui language, which is a North Dravidian language, but due to its isolation from the other Dravidian tongues it has considerable Balochi vocabulary and even counting begins with Balochi numbers.
Brahui is spoken in the following areas: Merv area of Turkmenistan, Sindh, Zahedan and Zabol in Iranian Balochistan, southern parts of Afghanistan, Pakistan Balochistan and with the bulk in the Jhalawan region.
The Brahui language is mainly spoken in the Kalat areas of Balochistan, Pakistan, although there is a considerable amount of speakers in Southern Afghanistan and Iranian Balochistan.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Brahui_people   (473 words)

  
 Kolangal: Tamil:
Language is many things - a system of communication, a medium of thought, a vehicle for literary expression, a social institution, a matter for political controversy and a catalyst for nation building.
But no language is as mysterious in its origins, as rich in history, as ancient in form and as copious in literature as Tamil is. Each of us, then, has a stake in understanding something about the nature and use of this language.
Brahui is the only member of the Dravidian family, which is spoken outside the Indian subcontinent and linguists have not been able to discover the link between the Brahui and the other speakers of Dravidian languages who live thousands of miles away in southern India.
www.ntyo.org /kolangal/tamilexotic.htm   (1349 words)

  
 Tamil Language - A brief review of its history and features
Languages such as Kolami, Parji, Naiki, Gondi, Ku, Kuvi, Konda, Malta, Oroan, Gadba, Khurukh, and Brahui are examples of Dravidian languages prevalent in the North.
Tamil was the language of bureaucracy, of literati and of culture for several centuries in Kerala.
In spoken language vaazaippazam (Å¡¨ÆôÀÆõ) is pronounced to the detestation of scholars as vaaLappaLam (Å¡ÇôÀÇõ) and Vaayappayam (Å¡ÂôÀÂõ).
www.geocities.com /Athens/5180/tamil7.html   (6269 words)

  
 Materials for A Bibliography of Dravidian Linguistics; Part 1, Amrita Row to Gundert
A Grammar of the Telugu Language, Madras, 1857.
Campbell, A.D. A Grammar of the Teloogoo Language, commonly termed the Gentoo, peculiar to the Hindoos inhabiting the North-Eastern provinces of the Indian Peninsula, Madras, 1816.
Driberg, J.G. A Grammar and Vocabulary of the Gond Language, Calcutta, 1849.
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /~haroldfs/dravling/projects/androb1.html   (2364 words)

  
 Brahui language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Brahui language is mainly spoken in Balochistan, Pakistan, although also in Afghanistan and Iran by the Brahui.
It is debated whether Brahui is a remnant of a formerly more widespread Dravidian language family that was reduced during the Aryan expansion, or if it is a more recent migrant from northern or central India.
It is also sometimes speculated that Brahui might be a legacy of the Indus Valley Civilisation.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Brahui_language   (158 words)

  
 Brahui   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
The Brahui language is spoken in Pakistan (mainly in the Kalat and Hairpur regions), Afghanistan, Iran and Turkmenistan.
The total number of Brahui speakers is estimated to be approximately 2,000,000 people.
All Brahuis are bilingual: in addition to the Brahui language, most of them speak Baluchi
www.flw.com /languages/brahui.htm   (46 words)

  
 Language Log: An Escape from Election News into Brahui
The book is Notes on the Study of the Brahui Language (Revised and Second Edition, Quetta, 1917), by Rai Bahadur Diwan Jamiat Rai, C.I.E., Extra Assistant Commissioner in Baluchistan.
To someone interested in language contact, like me, the most interesting sentences are in a section called `Miscellaneous Sentences'.
Brahui, the northernmost Dravidian language, has 1,710,000 speakers in three countries, but mostly in Pakistan.
itre.cis.upenn.edu /~myl/languagelog/archives/001619.html   (402 words)

  
 Pakistan - Linguistic and Ethnic Groups
Brahui is one such language; it is spoken by a group in Balochistan.
Although Urdu is the official national language, it is spoken as a native tongue by only 8 percent of the population.
Language riots in Dhaka occurred in the early 1950s, leading to the elevation of Bengali as a second national language with Urdu until the secession of East Pakistan in 1971; when Bangladesh became independent, Bangla was designated the official language.
countrystudies.us /pakistan/31.htm   (829 words)

  
 Brahui language --  Encyclopædia Britannica
The Brahui language is a far northwestern member of the Dravidian family of languages, all of whose other members are spoken in peninsular India; it has borrowed heavily from...
The languages of the region are generally classified as belonging to the following families: Indo-European (the Indo-Iranian branch in particular), Dravidian, Austro-Asiatic (Munda in particular), and Sino-Tibetan.
Brahui, a Dravidian language, is used in Pakistan and Iran.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9016169?tocId=9016169   (752 words)

  
 Language
The official language in the areas of Gwadar (occupied by Sultanate of Oman until 1958) was Arabic.
The western Balochi dialect is spoken between Karachi (Pakistan) and Kirman (Iran), among the Baloch of U.S.S.R and Turkmenistan, the Sultanate of Oman, the Khorasan province of Iran and Seistan (Iran-Afghanistan).
The Brahui language was said in the same memorandum, to be a Dravidian language having no affinity with any Indian language except the Gond dialects in central India.
members.fortunecity.com /balochistan/baloch/id15.html   (617 words)

  
 Brahui language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
In Pakistanit is mainly spoken in the Kalat region of Balochistan.
Although it is a Dravidian language, it has been heavilyinfluenced by other languages spoken in the area and shares few words with the Dravidian languages spoken in southern India and Sri Lanka.
It is sometimes speculated that the use of the Brahui language in Pakistan is a legacy of the Indus Valley Civilisation, and that its separation fromthe other Dravidian languages indicates they were formerly much more widely spread.
www.therfcc.org /brahui-language-141084.html   (147 words)

  
 LEARN ABOUT THEIR LIVES AND CULTURE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
The Brahui are a confederation of 29 tribes united by language, culture, and
Brahui have the reputation of being fierce tribes of strong desert men who submit to no law but their own.
One thing that marks the Brahui tribes as a separate people – distinct from their Baloch cousins and from all other peoples – is their language, called Brahui or Brahuidi.
www.peopleteams.org /brahui/lives_culture.htm   (1600 words)

  
 Afghanistan - Brahui   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
The Sunni Brahui is another distinctive group settled in the desert areas of southwestern Afghanistan.
The basic Brahui physical type is Veddoid of South India, and they speak Brahui which is allied to Dravidian, a major language of South India, with a heavy mixture of Balulchi and Pashto.
Brahui mostly work as tenant farmers or hired herders for Baluch or Pushtun khans.
countrystudies.us /afghanistan/49.htm   (90 words)

  
 IS INDUS VALLEY THE CRADLE OR CATACOMB OF THE DRAVIDIAN CIVILIZATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
The material for the literary compositions in this language were taken from the culture of the teachers, who obviously were Dravidians, and who found in this process a convenient and secretive way of preserving their culture with a key only known to themselves.
But by this time the Dravidian origin of the language and culture was forgotten, not merely due to the lapse of time, but also apparently as an outcome of cultural elimination.
But I feel that to understand the etymology of every word spoken in every language living or dear a globalized attempt should be made by UNESO or the Universities of the nations in partnership to harness their common knowledge to track down the etymology of every word spoken.
www.geocities.com /greenpolitics2001   (5126 words)

  
 The U of MT -- Mansfield Library LangFing Dravidian
You have reached the page on Dravidian languages, which is just one part of the "Language Finger" homepage, which is an index by language to the holdings of the Mansfield Library of The University of Montana.
Brahui is spoken in the Baluchistan province of India, and also in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, and Iran.
Brahui has no writing system of its own, but the Nastaliq script of the Arabic alphabet is now used.
www.lib.umt.edu /guide/lang/dravidh.htm   (1070 words)

  
 Sarbaaz.Com :': Places in Balochistan - Kalaat or Kalat :': ((Where Baloch Click?))   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
The population of the district was estimated at 316,787 in 1995.
The origins of the Brahui speaking tribes are uncertain.
The Brahui Khans of Kalat were dominant from the 18th century until the arrival of the British in the 19th century.
www.balochistan.sarbaaz.com /kalaat.htm   (345 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Search Results - Brahui Language
Brahui Language, Dravidian language spoken by about 2 million people in the Pakistani provinces of Baluchistan and Sind.
A bibliography is a list of the sources you used in your research.
It is usually included as a separate page or pages at the end of your assignment...
encarta.msn-ppe.com /Brahui_Language.html   (190 words)

  
 World Atlas of Language Structures: List of Sources   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
This bibliography first lists the sources for languages in the 100-language sample, followed by a list of sources for languages in the 200-language sample that are not in the 100-language sample.
Beaton, A. A Grammar of the Fur Language.
Appendix to the Dictionary and Grammar of the Kongo Language.
linguistics.buffalo.edu /people/faculty/dryer/dryer/atlas.bib   (2246 words)

  
 The Hindu : Vedic-Indus debate: save Indian civilisation today
But neither Rajaram nor Witzel discusses language much, except that Rajaram ridicules the claim that the Indus Civilisation had a Dravidian-type language saying that it is strange that the people would have lost their script.
The evidence that the Indus language was Dravidian-like is overwhelming, both circumstantial and linguistic.
A firm decision then should have been taken that the people's languages are the vehicles of modernisation, and to be used as the medium of modern education at all levels.
www.hinduonnet.com /thehindu/op/2002/02/05/stories/2002020500210100.htm   (1354 words)

  
 Ethnologue 14 report for language code:BRH
The following is the entry for this language as it appeared in the 14th edition (2000).
It has been superseded by the corresponding entry in the 15th edition (2005).
Brahui in Iran are reported to speak Western Baluchi now.
www.ethnologue.com /show_language.asp?code=BRH   (84 words)

  
 Economic Review: Aazadi Na Kesar. (book reviews)@ HighBeam Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Latest Novel in Brahui language by Dr. Naseer Aaqil; published by Yaasir Publishers, Quetta (Hard-back) PP 171 Price Rs.
Brahui is one of the significant languages of Balochistan.
This novel of Dr. Naseer Aaqii is the second novel published so far in Brahui.
www.highbeam.com /library/doc0.asp?DOCID=1G1:19446429&refid=ip_encyclopedia_hf   (161 words)

  
 On reading Vedic Texts by R. Nagaswamy
Their main contention is there exists now a language Brahui in Baluchistan that is supposed to be a Dravidian language, considered as the surviving relic from ancient Harappans.
It is imperative to know how much of Sanskrit or Prakrit words and structure that entered from India for nearly 700 years from 200 BCE to 600 CE, have survived in Afghanistan and Central Asia and how much of it is recognized in the Indo-European linguistics from the chronological point of view.
That Fairservis is quickly dismissed by Mahadevan as lacking in the knowledge of Dravidian languages only confirms my contention that there is no basis for the Dravidian hypothesis.
www.ifih.org /articles/rn002.html   (1854 words)

  
 Search Results for bilingual - Encyclopædia Britannica
All other Dravidian languages are spoken in peninsular India; Brahui's isolation from the other languages of the family has...
Until 1992 Spanish was the official language, although Guaraní was spoken by nearly 90 percent of the population.
ancient language spoken in northeastern Anatolia and used as the official language of Urartu in the 9th–6th century BC.
www.britannica.com /search?query=bilingual&submit=Find&source=MWTAB   (418 words)

  
 yourDictionary.com • Language Dictionaries   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
There are 6,800 known languages spoken in the 200 countries of the world.
New languages and dictionaries are constantly being added to yourDictionary.com; as a result, we have the widest and deepest set of dictionaries, grammars, and other language resources on the web.
If you cannot find the language resources you want on line, yourDictionary now offers 25,000 language resources on tape, video, CD ROM, and in traditional book form for children and adults in cooperation with WorldLanguage.
www.yourdictionary.com /languages.html   (194 words)

  
 Brahui language: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Brahui language
Brahui language: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Brahui language
Most speakers can not read or write the language.
It's sometimes speculated that the use of the Brahui language in Pakistan is a legacy of the Indus Valley Civilisation, and that its separation from the other Dravidian languages indicates they were formerly much more widely spread.
www.encyclopedian.com /br/Brahui-language.html   (165 words)

  
 WHAT   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
The Brahui language belongs to the Dravidian family of languages and is close to Tamil.
Quite clearly the Brahui’s are the only Dravidian survivors in northern India, after the Aryan invasion.
Brahui language still survives in small pockets but only just.
www.indiadefence.com /Baluch.htm   (1553 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Brahui language
The city of Kalat is located roughly in the center of Balochistan, Pakistan, south and slightly west of the provincial capital Quetta.
The Dravidian family of languages includes approximately 26 languages that are mainly spoken in southern India and Sri Lanka, as well as certain areas in Pakistan, Nepal, and eastern and central India.
The controversial Aryan invasion theory is a historical theory first put forth by the German Indologist Friedrich Max Müller and others in the mid nineteenth century in India.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Brahui-language   (304 words)

  
 Language Resources - B
The language shows considerable Baluchi influence and many of its speakers are bilingual in Brahui and Baluchi.
Brahui is unwritten, but the Arabic script is used to notate its rich folk literature.
The language has an elaborate nominal and verbal morphology.
www.langcen.cam.ac.uk /resources/lang-b/lang_b.php?c=13   (87 words)

  
 Brahui language -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
It reputedly has about 2,000,000 speakers in (A Muslim republic that occupies the heartland of ancient south Asian civilization in the Indus River valley; formerly part of India; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1947) Pakistan (1998), or 2,210,000 in the world.
In Pakistan it is mainly spoken in the (Click link for more info and facts about Kalat) Kalat region of Balochistan.
It is sometimes speculated that the use of the Brahui language in Pakistan is a legacy of the (Click link for more info and facts about Indus Valley Civilisation) Indus Valley Civilisation, and that its separation from the other Dravidian languages indicates they were formerly much more widely spread.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/B/Br/Brahui_language.htm   (155 words)

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