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Topic: Bretwalda


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In the News (Wed 26 Nov 14)

  
  Bretwalda - LoveToKnow 1911
BRETWALDA, a word used in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the date 827, and also in a charter of ZEthelstan, king of the English.
In the Chronicle the title is given to Ecgbert, king of the English, "the eighth king that was Bretwalda," and retrospectively to seven kings who ruled over one or other of the English kingdoms.
Another theory is that Bretwalda refers to a war-leadership, or imperium, over the English south of the Humber, and has nothing to do with Britons or Britannia.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Bretwalda   (250 words)

  
 Bretwalda
The title of Bretwalda was one given to some of the kings of the kingdoms of England in the second half of the first millennium AD.
The original lists of Bretwalda did not contain the kings Ethelbald and Offa of Mercia, but in all probability they were considered Bretwalda in their time.
The title of Bretwalda gradually fell into disuse around or after the Danish invasion of the 860s and 870s, the king becoming known as 'King of England', the first such king being Alfred the Great, king of Wessex since 871, although he is considered primarily a Bretwalda.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/br/Bretwaldas.html   (243 words)

  
 Bretwalda - Definition, explanation
The title of Bretwalda was one perhaps used by some of the kings of the kingdoms of England (the so-called Anglo-Saxon heptarchy) in the second half of the first millennium AD.
The term Bretwalda is a problematic one and is best left in favour of the word 'overlord' which better describes the relationship the king held with the various other kings and peoples of Britain.
When a Bretwalda ruled over a larger kingdom, such as a Mercian ruler over East Anglia, the relationship would have been more equal than in the case of a larger kingdom ruling over a smaller one, as in the case of Mercia and Hwicce.
www.calsky.de /lexikon/en/txt/b/br/bretwalda.php   (496 words)

  
 BRETWALDA - Online Information article about BRETWALDA
Britain "; for although the derivation of the word is uncertain, its earlier syllable seems to be cognate with the words Briton and Britannia.
Ecgbert, king of the English, " the eighth king that was Bretwalda," and retrospectively to seven See also:
Palgrave that the Bretwaldas were the successors of the pseudo-emperors, See also:
encyclopedia.jrank.org /BOS_BRI/BRETWALDA.html   (505 words)

  
 The Eored - History
As the harvest of 1101 (23rd year of the reign of Hegel Bretwalda) was collected in the native lands of the Éothéod, situated in the plains south of the Sky Door Mountains far to the northwest in the territories claimed by the Jhereg, the country was visited by a great plague.
Returning to the bretwalda with the khan’s offer, and in the absence of any other promise of assistance, the bretwalda was forced to choose between watching his people starve in their homes or have them undertake a perilous journey to a distant and unknown land.
Almost a full cycle of the moon passed while the bretwalda consulted with his advisors before the decision was made: the Éothéod would be uprooted from their ancestral lands to move south to a new home far away in the lands of the Steppe Alliance.
www.eored.co.uk /history.asp   (511 words)

  
 Bretwalda - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Bretwalda is an Anglo-Saxon term, the first record of which comes from the late ninth-century Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
The word Bretwalda is perhaps derived from the Anglo-Saxon Bretanwealda, "Lord of Britain".
For some time the existence of the word Bretwalda in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, which was based in part on the list given by Bede in his Ecclesiastical History, led historians to think that there was perhaps a "title" held by overlords on Great Britain.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Bretwalda   (840 words)

  
 [No title]
BRETWALDA, a word used in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the date 827, and also in a charter of sEthelstan, king of the English.
It appears in several variant forms (brytenwalda, bretenanwealda, andc.), and means most probably " lord of the Britons " or " lord of Britain "; for although the derivation of the word is uncertain, its earlier syllable seems to be cognate with the words Briton and Britannia.
In the Chronicle the title is given to Ecgbert, king of the English, " the eighth king that was Bretwalda," and retrospectively to seven kings who ruled over one or other of the English kingdoms.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /correction/edit?locale=en&content_id=11032   (287 words)

  
 Bretwalda Information
Bretwalda is an Anglo-Saxon term, the first record of which comes from the late ninth-century Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
Bretwalda is, therefore, a highly problematic term, and one which, if anything, was merely the attempt by a West Saxon chronicler to make some claim of West Saxon kings to the whole of Great Britain.
For some time the existence of the word Bretwalda in the Anglo-Saxon Chroncile, which was based in part on the list given by Bede in his Ecclesiastical History, led historians to think that there was perhaps a "title" held by overlords on Great Britain.
www.bookrags.com /Bretwalda   (808 words)

  
 The Anglo-Saxon Bretwaldas
Usually this was at a time when that ruler's kingdom was at its strongest, and initial force of arms had demonstrated the ability of that ruler to claim the title of bretwalda or brytenwealda.
Some others are not named bretwalda as such, but pretty much fulfilled the functions of the title in all but name (and it is possible that records were made and later lost - or that for the most part it was obvious and taken for granted, and didn't need to be noted).
Until Edwin of the Northumbrians took the title, the bretwaldas only counted their territory as being south of the Humber.
www.kessler-web.co.uk /History/KingListsBritain/EnglandBretwaldas.htm   (230 words)

  
 Bretwalda
Bretwalda is an Anglo-Saxon term, the first record of which comes from the late ninth-century Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
Bretwalda is, therefore, a highly problematic term, and one which, if anything, was merely the attempt by a West Saxon chronicler to make some claim of West Saxon kings to the; whole of Great Britain.
For some time the existence of the word Bretwalda in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, which was based in part on the list given by Bede in his Historia ecclesiastica, led historians to think that there was perhaps a "title" held by overlords on Great Britain.
bretwalda.zdnet.co.za /zdnet/Bretwalda   (1129 words)

  
 The Heptarchy: Anglo-Saxon Ascendancy
Cynric's son Ceaulin was bretwalda and was the leader of Wessex at the time of the Synod of Whitby.
Edwin of Deira, the son of Aelle, ruled both kingdoms from 616 to 632 and was bretwalda during this time.
Oswiu succeeded him in 641, was named bretwalda, and was the leader of Northumbria at the time of the Synod of Whitby.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/ancient_british_history/61860   (429 words)

  
 Fantasy Flight Games Forum - Kings & Bretwalda   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
It was a deliberate change, as was the move of Bretwalda/King from the start of a turn to the end of the previous turn and the absence of binding deals for Bretwalda votes.
Eliminating the Bretwalda points in 11-16 is a "bigger deal," though it does reflect history better.
Lew has said that this was his original intention and that it was the publisher that added the vote-if-no-King rule (along with a number of other changes he didn't agree on), so he was very keen to see the original intent back.
www.fantasyflightgames.com /cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?num=1143382401/0   (422 words)

  
 Revised rules for Britannia
From turn 9 onwards a Bretwalda or King may be elected at the beginning of the turn, as described in section 6.
Such agreements are binding, but only until the end of the next Bretwalda election phase and only insofar as the nations are able to fulfil their obligations within the rules of the game.
As with Bretwalda elections, all nations are eligible for kingship even if this isn't mentioned on their VP table, except as noted below.
www.diku.dk /~torbenm/EBrit/newrules.html   (6345 words)

  
 J35 Class Association   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Bretwalda then came back with a 1st and with Falcon taking 6th the lead changed once again with Bretwalda back in 1st.
Bretwalda and Falcon taking a 6th and 5th respectively they were tied once again, but in second 3 points off the lead.
At the finish it was Bretwalda followed by Train, Falcon, Wild Ride, Major Detail, Scandal, Double Shot......it appeared to be a Bretwalda regatta victory.
www.j35.org /fullracingnews.cfm?NewsID=6   (708 words)

  
 Bretwalda   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The title BRETWALDA appears in the 'Anglo-Saxon Chronicle', against the year 827, and is usually translated along the lines of 'Ruler of Britain'.
Bede, who didn't use the word Bretwalda in Manuscript A (and G) of the \'Chronicle\'.
Obviously, those Bretwalda who were kings of Northumbria would, by default, also rule territory north of the Humber, but Bede notes that Edwin:
www.stephen.j.murray.btinternet.co.uk /bretwalda.htm   (329 words)

  
 dX Magazine :: View topic - [Wierd World War] The Bretwalda
During the heptarchy the spell was maintained by the bretwalda, the Sacred King of England—this office passed from kingdom to kingdom on a generational basis.
In 874 the then bretwalda, King Burgred of Mercia fled from his kingdom and carried the traditon of the Bretwalda, and the responsibility of maintaining the spell, into hiding.
So once every seven years they have a ritual foot-race: the head of the family, the Bretwalda, is given a furlong start, and any of his sons, brothers, and nephews who are over 17 but younger than he is chase him over a one-mile course.
www.setbb.com /phpbb/viewtopic.php?mforum=dx&p=518   (1582 words)

  
 Britain - circa 600 AD (DBA Campaign Scenario)
Bretwalda -- All of the Anglo-Saxon kings have recognized King Aethelberht of Kent as Bretwalda, and must therefore provide one or more elements to an allied contingent upon request.
A contingent may not exceed a total of four elements and deploys as part of the initial set-up under the control of the Bretwalda, who uses a 1D4 for pips.
The Bretwalda may also elect to send an allied contingent to support any other Anglo-Saxon king, whether requested or not.
fanaticus.org /DBA/campaigns/campaignBritain600ad.html   (992 words)

  
 Chronological Listing of the Kings of England
The genealogy of the kings of Sussex has not been preserved beyond the fact that Aelle, the founder of the kingdom, is considered the first Bretwalda and was succeeded by his son Cyssa.
His grandson Raedwald, was the fourth Bretwalda, and is considered the king who was buried in the long-boat excavated at Sutton Hoo in 1939.
The Old English word bretwalda (Britain ruler) had it's origins in the old Germanic word brytenwealda meaning "wide ruler" or perhaps "king who rules other kings." Offa of Mercia and Ecgberht of Wessex are also often listed with the Bretwaldas.
www.wnccoins.com /0018.htm   (539 words)

  
 DP S1997M: Heptarchy and Bretwalda - Twin Variants Based on Ancient Britain
Bretwalda is a very new variant which may not even be finalised at the time of going to press!
It is the result of lots of historical research, although I've still used some poetic licence in places where this has failed.
Bretwalda has never been played before, and I'd very much like to try it out, obviously!
devel.diplom.org /Zine/S1997M/Bache/dpart.html   (1279 words)

  
 Heptarchy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
There was an unbroken succession of wars in which the various rulers sought to eclipse and dominate their neighbours.
The 7th century saw Northumbrian Bretwaldas; Mercian leaders achieved dominence in the 8th century; and in A.D. 828, Ecgbert of Wessex was recognized as the most powerful Bretwalda to date as the “Overlord of the Seven Kingdoms of the Heptarchy”.
In the late 9th century, King Alfred of Wessex (Alfred the Great) achieved a special status whereby he was the first king to be recognized as a truly national leader.
www.robertsewell.ca /heptarchy.html   (385 words)

  
 Bretwalda repeats win in PH Mac - Sailing Anarchy Forums
Bretwalda wins Port Huron/MAC for the second consecutive time in the J35/T35 section.
But in their case it is not "fast ride" so much as "gift rating." Even still, they must be *farily good* to be close enough in the game for their rating to even work I suppose...
Bretwalda finishes first in the J35/T35 *even rated* section?
www.sailinganarchy.com /forums/index.php?showtopic=6621&view=findpost&p=108929   (335 words)

  
 Brewer, E. Cobham. Dictionary of Phrase & Fable. Bretwalda (ruler of Britain).
Shaw, G.B. Stein, G. Stevenson, R.L. Wells, H.G. Reference > Brewer’s Dictionary > Bretwalda (ruler of Britain).
The chief of the kings of the heptarchy who exercised a certain undefined power over the other rulers; something like that of Hugues Cap’et over his peers.
“The office of Bretwalda, a kind of elective chieftainship, of all Britain, was held by several Northumbrian kings, in succession.”—Earle; English Tongue, p.
www.bartleby.com /81/2461.html   (93 words)

  
 Anglo-Saxon Kings of Britain
fought battles at least from 477 to 491, was called Bretwalda (ruler of Britain) by the Saxons.
King of Kent, baptised in 597, succeeded Ceawlien as Bretwalda
King of Eastanglia, succeeded Æthelbert as Bretwalda, supported Eadwini of Deira to defeat Æthelfrid of Northumbria who had slain Eadwini's father Aelle, Raedwald is probably buried in Sutton Hoo
www.fortunecity.com /bally/leitrim/147/saxons.html   (1633 words)

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