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Topic: British coinage


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  British coinage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The total amount of coinage in circulation is roughly three and a quarter billion pounds, of which the £1 and £2 coins account for almost two billion pounds [1].
In the 12th century a new standard for English coinage was established by Henry II, the Sterling Silver standard of metal—92.5% silver and 7.5% copper used in coinage.
In 1920, the silver content of all British coins was reduced from 92.5% to 50%, with a portion of the remainder consisting of manganese, which caused the coins to tarnish to a very dark colour after they had been in circulation for a significant period.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/British_coinage   (2344 words)

  
 The Monarchy Today > Bank notes & coinage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Coinage played a part in spreading the fame of kings - the more often coins passed through men's hands, and the further afield they were taken by plunder or trade, the more famous their royal sponsors became.
A nominal coinage was issued under John Balliol c.1296 and then in reign of Robert the Bruce (1306-1329), but the first substantial issue of coinage did not come until the reign of David II (1329-1371).
Some British coinages have featured Scottish devices, the Royal Arms of Scotland or the thistle emblem during the 20th century, but these are a part of the coinage of the United Kingdom, not unique to Scotland.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/page321.asp   (1113 words)

  
 British Coins before the Florin, Compared to French Coins of the Ancient Regime
The first official coinage, of 1792, was based on gold coins of the traditional British fineness of 22 carat gold and a precise ratio of gold to silver of 15:1.
The copper coinage of Anastasius, which is the principal innovation, is all clearly marked with its value in the form of Greek letters: "M" for 40, "K" for 20, "I" for 10, and "E" for 5.
The modern British 5p coin, which is the decimal descendant of the shilling, thus may be said to be the last link to Roman coinage, although, as the solidus, it only existed on paper for the many centuries of the silver penny.
www.friesian.com /coins.htm   (7159 words)

  
 British Coinage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Until 1971, when the British coinage was converted to decimalisation, the coins in use were pounds, shillings and pence, based on the Latin names "Librae, Solidii, Denarii" or £.
The following year a gold coinage was issued based on the sovereign (one pound) rather than the guinea (one pound and one shilling), which had been the principal gold unit since 1663.
The coinage was finally decimalized in 1971 with a coinage in which 100 pence equals 1 pound.
www.swanseamass.org /wales/travel/coins.html   (411 words)

  
 British coinage
In the 12th century a new standard for English coinage was established by Henry II, the Sterling Silver standard of metal -- 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper used in coinage.
British government sources suggest that prices have risen over 61 fold since 1914, so a mediaeval sterling silver penny might be worth around £4.50 today, and a farthing (a quarter penny) would have the value of slightly more than today's pound.
The old British system of money, which evolved from mediaeval times, used a selection of coins known as guineas, pounds, Crownss, Half-Crowns, shillings, thruppence, pennys, half-pennys and farthings.
www.gamesinathens.com /olympics/b/br/british_coinage.shtml   (1239 words)

  
 British Academy Review 1998-1999 - M Blackburn, "Fifty volumes of the Sylloge of British coins"   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Lord Stewartby (left), Chairman of the British Academy’s Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles Committee, introduces Vsevolod Potin, Director of the Numismatic Department of the Hermitage Museum, at a reception held at the Academy on Tuesday 30 March 1999.
Publishing the Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles (SCBI) volumes has been the project's primary objective — and there are some 20 more in active preparation — but the Sylloge Committee is also eager to encourage scholars in allied disciplines to make use of numismatic evidence and interpretation in their work.
The Sylloge Committee is also planning a colloquium on Anglo-Saxon coinage as a source of primary evidence for historians and archaeologists to be held at the British Academy.
www.britac.ac.uk /news/review/01-9899/21-blackburn.html   (1019 words)

  
 Maundy money - One Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Until 1820 ordinary silver coinage was used for the Maundy money, but from 1822 special coins were minted in values of 1, 2, 3, and 4 pence.
In 1947 silver was removed from all circulating British coins in favour of cupronickel, but it was felt to be inappropriate to strike Maundy money in such debased metal, so unusually the fineness was restored to 0.925, where it remains to the present day.
In 1971 British currency was decimalised, with 100 new pence instead of 20 shillings of 12 pence (240 pence) in a pound.
www.onelang.com /encyclopedia/index.php/Maundy_money   (960 words)

  
 British Copper and Bronze Coins 1672-1970
The penny and its divisions had been important elements of the British coinage system for centuries when the adoption of a decimal system in 1971 replaced the old penny valued at 1/240 of a pound with one valued at 100 to the pound.
Copper as a coinage metal was generally shunned by Britain until the reign of Charles II (1660-85) and had appeared only in the form of undated farthings (equal to one-fourth of a penny), these competing with various tradesmen’s tokens.
The immediate post-war coinage of pennies created a redundancy, and this denomination was coined only in 1953 and 1954 (the latter being unique) before experiencing a six-year hiatus.
www.coinsite.com /content/articles/britaincopper.asp   (1451 words)

  
 Coinage -- British India Coinage
The rise of one dominant power after over a hundred years of turmoil, enabled the enactment of the Coinage Act of 1835 and for uniform coinage to be issued.
The first coinage under the crown was issued in 1862 and in 1877 Queen Victoria assumed the title the Empress of India.
The Indian Coinage Act, 1906 was passed which governed the establishment of Mints as well as the coins that would be issued and the standards that would be maintained (Rupee 180 grains, Silver 916.66 standard; Half Rupee 90 grains, Quarter Rupee 45 grains).
www.rbi.org.in /currency/museum/c-brit.html   (412 words)

  
 Ireland Information Guide , Irish, Counties, Facts, Statistics, Tourism, Culture, How
In the 12th century a new standard for English coinage was established by Henry II, the Sterling Silver standard of metal – 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper used in coinage.
In 1920, the silver content of all British coins was reduced from 92.5% to 50%, with a portion of the remainder consisting of manganese, which caused the coins to tarnish to a very dark color after they had been in circulation for a significant period.
The old British system of money, which evolved from mediaeval times, used a selection of coins known as guineas, pounds, Crowns, Half-Crowns, shillings, thruppence, pennies, halfpennies and farthings.
www.irelandinformationguide.com /British_coinage   (1384 words)

  
 Third farthing (British coin) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The coin was produced in 1827 exclusively for use in Malta, but it is considered to be part of the British coinage as at that time Malta was considered more as a part of Britain than in the twentieth century.
A proclamation issued in Malta on 3 November 1827 legalised the new coins, referring to them as British Grains.
The cost of living in Malta was lower than in Britain, and it was not considered appropriate to introduce them in Britain.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/British_coin_Third_Farthing   (474 words)

  
 English/British coin Threepence
Although it was an easy denomination to work with in the context of the old sterling coinage system, being a quarter of a shilling, initially it was not popular with the public who preferred the groat[?], hence the coin was not minted in the following two reigns.
There was also a fairly rare milled coinage threepence, produced between 1561 and 1564 with similar designs and inscriptions to the hammered coinage threepences.
The final hammered coinage threepences were produced at the start of the reign of king Charles II.
www.fastload.org /en/English___British_coin_Threepence.html   (2144 words)

  
 Numismatics, Australia: Colonial coinage
In addition to British coinage, there were guilders and ducats from Holland, rupees and pagodas from India and several other coins as well as a few English and Irish banknotes.
It is important to understand the coinage in circulation in 1800 and subsequent years was not limited to what was explicitly mentioned in King's proclamation.
This is not too surprising when one considers the shopkeeper's position; would he or she prefer a bill drawn on the British Treasury countersigned by the governor, or a hand-scribbled note issued by an ex-convict who may or may not have the means to redeem it.
www.triton.vg /colonial.html   (2570 words)

  
 British Silver Coinage: Introduction   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Although England restricted the export of its silver coinage, it is clear some British silver, as well as some British gold coins, found their way to the American colonies.
Coins were brought to the colonies by settlers, by British officials and soldiers, as well as by merchants and sailors.
General references to British coinage are from: Richard Lobel et al., Coincraft's Standard Catalogue of English & UK Coins 1066 to Date London: Coincraft, 1995 and Brian Reeds, Standard Catalogue of British Coins: Coins of England and the United Kingdom31st ed.
www.coins.nd.edu /ColCoin/ColCoinIntros/Br-Silver.intro.html   (394 words)

  
 British Indian coinage
The British presence in India started in 1612, twelve years after the granting by Queen Elizabeth the First of a Royal Charter to the 218 Knights and merchants of the City of London who formed a company which received different names but remained in history as "the" East India Company.
As their "European style" coinage was not accepted outside their juridiction, and after having briefly tried to struck rupees in Mughal style bearing the name of the British king (the previous coin), the British obtained in 1717 the right to strike their own rupees in the name of the Mughal Emperor.
As a consequence of the Napoleonic wars and the rupture between Great Britain and Holland in 1795, a British expedition annexed the Dutch settlements in Ceylon to the Presidency of Madras in 1796 and the whole island was under British sovereignty by 1815.
www.geocities.com /jmd_brussels/EURUKE.html   (1126 words)

  
 British Numismatics
Sylloge of coins of the British Isles, 17; ancient British, Anglo-Saxon and Norman coins in Midlands Museums, by A. Gunstone.
Sylloge of coins of the British Isles; The Hiberno-Norse coins in the British Museum.
A catalogue of the copper coins and tokens of the British Isles, compiled by Herbert Allen Seaby and Peter John Seaby.
www.calcoin.org /library/britush.html   (1242 words)

  
 The European Influence on United States Coinage and the Nationalistic Ideas Portrayed Therein - PCGS Library
By the mid-eighteenth century, among the coinage of numerous European powers, many coins featuring Britannia were circulating in the English colonies, including copper farthings and halfpence, where the reigning king was featured on the obverse of the coin (Colonial Coins).
While the eagle had previously appeared on some American coinage such as the Massachusetts copper, it had never been on a coin designed to be used throughout the United States until Boulton and Watt introduced it in 1791 on their Washington copper.
Then, four years later, in the Coinage Act of April 2, 1792, the Senate and House of Representatives stated, "That a Mint for the purpose of a national coinage be, and the same is established" (Ganz 1).
www.pcgs.com /articles/article_view.chtml?artid=4267&universeid=313   (2708 words)

  
 Varun Parekh's Coin Collection (Republic India Coins - Post Independance)
During the period of transition India retained the monetary system and the currency and coinage of the earlier period.
However, it was in September, 1955 that the Indian Coinage Act was amended for the country to adopt a metric system for coinage.
Over a period of time, cost benefit considerations led to the gradual discontinuance of 1, 2 and 3 paise coins in the seventies; Stainless steel coinage of 10, 25 and 50 paise, was introduced in 1988 and of one rupee in 1992.
www.angelfire.com /on2/coins/republic.html   (506 words)

  
 British milled coins
In India the British fought a series of wars from 1746 to 1817 which eventually brought mastery of the whole sub-continent.
The coinage throughout the period was milled, produced by a variety of machinery, though the old hammered coinage still remained as legal tender until 1696.
The introduction of a copper coinage in 1672 was a major departure from the practice in previous reigns.
www.predecimal.com /p8milled.htm   (2369 words)

  
 British Copper Coinage: Introduction
With the change from hammer coinage to the use of the screw press the king hoped to be able to profitably make a sufficient number of standardized small change coppers for the country.
In 1787 because of a lack of copper coinage Thomas Williams and the Anglesey Copper Minting Company in Wales produced private pennies and halfpence with a portrait of a hooded druid on the obverse.
Also, as the merchants were already accepting British coppers at a lower rate, in January the city of New York officially lowered the value of the halfpenny to fourteen to the New York shilling.
www.nd.edu /~rarebook/coins/ColCoin/ColCoinIntros/Br-Copper.intro.html   (5347 words)

  
 The DiCamillo Companion - British Money Home Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
An earlier version of the Florin existed in the 14th century; it was a gold coin introduced by Edward III in 1344 in an attempt to produce coinage suitable for use in Europe as well as in England.
The coin is considered to be part of British coinage because it has no indication of what country it was minted for, being made in the same style as the contemporary Third Farthing.
The coin is considered to be part of British coinage because it has no indication of what country it was minted for, being made in the same style as the contemporary Quarter Farthing.
www.dicamillocompanion.com /British_Money.html   (2725 words)

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