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Topic: British naval supremacy


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In the News (Fri 19 Jul 19)

  
  Borden-Speeches-House of Commons, December 5, 1912-First Among Equals
During my recent visit to the British islands, I ventured on many public occasions to propound the principle that the great dominions, sharing in the defence of the Empire upon the high seas, must necessarily be entitled to share also in the responsibility for and in the control of foreign policy.
In considering the power of the British Empire to maintain that predominance upon the sea which is essential to its safety and to its very existence, it is clear that reference to the other naval forces of the world cannot be excluded.
It is the general naval supremacy of Great Britain which is the primary safeguard of the security and interests of the great dominions of the Crown, and which for all these years has been the deterrent upon any possible designs prejudicial to or inconsiderate of their policy and safety.
www.collectionscanada.ca /primeministers/h4-4059-e.html   (0 words)

  
 HistoryBuff.com -- The Spanish Armada of 1588
Spain would then pass its banner of naval supremacy, not to the English, but to the Dutch, who under their brilliant admiral Michiel de Ruyter defeated English fleets in several Anglo-Dutch Wars of the late 17th century.
It was not until the mid-1700s that British naval supremacy, as it is commonly recognized in hindsight, began to emerge, as the Dutch had entered into decline and the British and French were free to challenge each other for dominance of the waves.
Naval encounters from that point onward became technological races in many respects, with each side rapidly seeking improvements in both shipbuilding and ordnance, and sea battles became characterized increasingly as water-borne duels in which adversaries sought to damage each other from distances optimal to the ranges of their cannon.
www.historybuff.com /library/refarmada4.html   (0 words)

  
 AGE OF SAIL - HISTORY
British ships were much smaller than their Spanish (and French) opposite numbers, and the quality of the British officer corps was at first only modestly better than the French officer corps, at least in the first years -- and hence smashing victories were at first non-existent.
What I mean by this is that the average competence of British captains had tremendously increased from 1740 to 1763, and a new standard of professionalism in the British naval officer corps had emerged.
By 1815 Britain had utilized her naval supremacy to seize numerous overseas possessions of France, Spain, and the Netherlands, thus establishing the empire "on which the Sun never set" and ending the wars as the true Queen of the Seas.
ageofsail.org /history.html   (1753 words)

  
  Main Royal Naval page
Nevertheless, generally the British were better trained, employing highly destructive tactics such as firing into hulls rather than into sails and rigging; employing multiple shotting causing extreme splinter damage; as well as being capable of firing at faster rates than their opponents.
Naval finance, including the payment of officers and men was the responsibility of the Treasurer of the Navy.
Naval structures of ranks and rates have always been complicated and prior to the Victorian era may appear totally alien to individuals otherwise familiar with the R.N. These in particular require explanation.
www.barnettresearch.freeserve.co.uk /mainaval.htm   (7322 words)

  
  Rodger
British wars for overseas trade or possessions, and strictly defensive wars against overseas enemies, could be conducted largely or entirely at sea and overseas — as they were in the English case up to 1688.
The British government was consistently spending about twice the proportion of national income which was available to French governments, yet because most British taxes (until income tax) were indirect and inconspicuous, the French believed themselves to be much more heavily burdened.
Thus the final achievement of naval supremacy, after so many false starts and disappointments, was truly a national achievement which drew on the economic and social resources of the three kingdoms to sustain professional sea power at war.
myweb.tiscali.co.uk /casamirror/rodger.htm   (3161 words)

  
 The Royal Navy in Nova Scotia Waters - Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management
Naval vessels continued to visit Annapolis Royal sporadically; it continued as the microscopic capital of Nova Scotia, with a military garrison and governing council.
Naval operations also included occasional stops at Canso on the far northeastern coast, established as a military outpost to protect the fishery and maintain a watch over French operations at Louisbourg in Ile Royale (Cape Breton).
The unending parade of British naval vessels in and out of the harbour over 150 years, and the economic impact made locally by the equally unending need for their repair and provisioning, instilled in Haligonians a solid belief in the mightiness of the British Empire.
www.gov.ns.ca /nsarm/virtual/royalnavy/default.asp?Language=English   (0 words)

  
 British naval supremacy - guideofcasinos.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Saxon naval forces having failed to prevent William the Conqueror from crossing the channel and winning the Battle of Hastings, the Norman kings started an equivalent force in 1155, with ships provided by the Cinque Ports alliance (possibly created by Norman, possibly pre-existing then developed by them for their own purposes).
Naval supremacy was vital to the amphibious operations carried out, such as the invasions of Northwest Africa, Sicily, Italy, and Normandy.
Nowadays the British sailor is usually "Jack" (or "Jenny") rather than the more historical "Jack Tar", which is an allusion to either the former requirement to tar long hair or that, in the age of sail, hemp ropes were preserved in tar, causing the sailor's hands to become stained with tar.
www.guideofcasinos.com /British_naval_supremacy.html   (4562 words)

  
 Roland G. Usher. Pan Germanism. 1913. Chapter 17. Appendix. Bibliography.
During my recent visit to the British Islands I ventured on many public occasions to propound the principle that the great Dominions, sharing in the defence of the Empire upon the high seas, must necessarily be entitled to share also in the responsibility for and in the control of foreign policy.
General naval supremacy consists in the power to defeat in battle and drive from the seas the strongest hostile navy or combination of hostile navies wherever they may be found.
It is the general naval supremacy of Great Britain which is the primary safeguard of the security and interests of the great Dominions of the Crown, and which for all these years has been the deterrent upon any possible designs prejudicial to or inconsiderate of their policy and safety.
www.lib.byu.edu /~rdh/wwi/comment/PanGer/PanGer6.htm   (7315 words)

  
 In Irons: Britain's Naval Supremacy and the American Revolutionary Economy | Book Reviews | EH.Net
This naval supremacy affected not only trade, but also production, especially in the dominant agricultural sector, and thus the ability of Americans to support and finance the war for independence.
These factors, together with the increased costs of trade due to the British blockade meant the French failed to replace the British in trade with the American states; and these reasons explain why much of the trade in textiles and other manufactured goods reverted back to Britain after the War.
The ability of the British to seize American ports was even more devastating than the higher costs of shipping and trade caused by the blockade.
www.eh.net /bookreviews/library/0337.shtml   (0 words)

  
 British Naval Supremacy: Some Factors Newly Considered.
In 1759 the decisive crippling of French naval strength, was triumphantly achieved by the Western Squadron, which simultaneously defended Britain from invasion and protected British attacks on the French Empire in Canada and the West Indies against interception from France.
Careening, naval stores, supply, victualling and hospital facilities were established at these bases, thus enabling the Navy to maintain an all round presence in permanent stations as opposed to the French practice of sending out squadrons from Europe for short periods each year.
A major factor extending the parameters of British naval power were the number of dockyards which facilitated the major overhaul of warships, with twenty-three home dry docks in 1793-6 as against eight in French and eight in Spanish yards, the Royal Navy could turn around more ships at a faster rate than its rivals.
home.europa.com /~bessel/Naval/MW2.html   (0 words)

  
 German Navy
German naval policy had a domestic-political agenda and was important to the prestige of the monarchy, but it appears that he may have been hoping for a significant, if unspecified, event which would present Germany with its "political independence" from Britain.
Over a period of six years, the "official" British response to German naval policy had been to progressively withdraw the blockade to ever greater distances where it was less and less likely that German plans could have any success, unless the British attempted to press the offensive.
In the absence of any naval ally for Germany, it is hard to avoid the conclusion that the Tirpitz Plan was an extended and expensive exercise in self-delusion.
members.tripod.com /~ianluker/navy/gernav3.htm   (0 words)

  
 Royal Navy information - Search.com
Saxon naval forces having failed to prevent William I from crossing the channel and winning the Battle of Hastings, the Norman kings started an equivalent force in 1155, with ships provided by the Cinque Ports alliance (possibly created by Norman, possibly pre-existing then developed by them for their own purposes).
The functions of the Defence Council that concern the administration of the Naval Service are formally delegated to an Admiralty Board and its sub-committee, the Navy Board, which is responsible for the day-to-day running of the Royal Navy.
The British Royal Navy is commonly referred to as "The Royal Navy" both inside and outside the United Kingdom.
www.search.com /reference/Royal_Navy   (4002 words)

  
 The National Archives | Exhibitions & Learning online | First World War | Spotlights on history
The British government moved immediately to strangle the supply of raw materials and foodstuffs to Germany and its allies.
Armed with contraband lists, British naval ships spent the war patrolling the North Sea, intercepting and detaining thousands of merchant ships thought to be harbouring cargo bound for enemy shores.
Germany attempted to counter the crippling effects of the blockade with a new weapon that seemed capable of subverting British naval superiority: the submarine.
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk /pathways/firstworldwar/spotlights/blockade.htm   (0 words)

  
 Old enemies come together: 200th anniversary of Battle of Trafalgar, Spanish News, Spain, Expatica
The Battle of Trafalgar ended the threat of invasion by France and established British naval supremacy for the next century.
HMS Victory was built in Chatham and Chatham is additionally twinned with Cadiz, British naval sources said, explaining the choice of British boat to attend.
The Spanish bitterly criticised the decision by French Admiral Pierre-Charles Villeneuve to sail from Cadiz to engage the British in poor conditions with Napoleon impatient for battle to commence -- against the advice of Spanish commander Admiral Federico de Gravina.
www.expatica.com /actual/article.asp?subchannel_id=82&story_id=24632   (868 words)

  
 Bambooweb: British naval supremacy
Naval supremacy was vital to the amphibious operations carried out, such as the invasions of Northwest Africa, Sicily, Italy and Normandy.
Prior to this, the main RN contribution to the UK's vital presence in the region was provided by the Armilla Patrol which continues, and is made up of a single escort vessel and a supporting RFA vessel.
Though a permanent RN presence in the Far East and Pacific regions has ended, the RN deploys a significant Naval Task Group (NTG) approximately every three years as part of the Five Powers Defence Arrangement which was signed by the governments of Australia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and the UK.
www.bambooweb.com /articles/b/r/British_naval_supremacy.html   (1501 words)

  
 The Churchill Era: An Educational Resource
The naval race was not the sort of "race" which had a clear-cut winner or loser.
But the threat that the Germans could give the British a good run for their money was real, the more so since the German fleet was concentrated in the Baltic and North Sea, whereas the British had to spread their resources over a much wider area of the globe.
If anything, Germany suffered from not building up her fleet enough: the British naval blockade, which a large German fleet might have been expected to challenge, was a major factor in bringing Germany to defeat.
www.chu.cam.ac.uk /archives/churchill_era/a_level/naval_race/interpretation.php   (811 words)

  
 article_connelly_battleships_augdec04.htm
A naval building race with Germany was powered on in part by the press’s careful management of public hysteria for Dreadnoughts, a hysteria the Liberal government could not dare to ignore.
According to the naval historians Alan Raven and John Roberts, the job of the battleship was to destroy the enemy's capital ships, and in pre-war planning most navies saw aviation as the aerial cavalry, keeping the enemy in play and slowing it down until the heavy units arrived with their superior gunnery.
British war films might have presented a glorious vision of the nation at its best under the trials of conflict, but by the 1950s the hard evidence proved that Britain’s heyday had passed and military technology was advancing apace.
www.ijnhonline.org /volume3_number2-3_AugDec04/article_connelly_battleships_augdec04.htm   (10187 words)

  
 In Irons: Britain's Naval Supremacy and the American Revolutionary Economy | Book Reviews | EH.Net   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This naval supremacy affected not only trade, but also production, especially in the dominant agricultural sector, and thus the ability of Americans to support and finance the war for independence.
These factors, together with the increased costs of trade due to the British blockade meant the French failed to replace the British in trade with the American states; and these reasons explain why much of the trade in textiles and other manufactured goods reverted back to Britain after the War.
The ability of the British to seize American ports was even more devastating than the higher costs of shipping and trade caused by the blockade.
eh.net /bookreviews/library/0337   (1455 words)

  
 Battle of Trafalgar : Battles : History : Royal Navy
The battle also immortalised the memory of  Viscount Horatio Nelson who was shot and died of his wounds at the moment of his greatest victory.
Many of the British ships were damaged, some seriously, including the HMS Victory which engaged the French flagship Bucentaure and the Redoutable.
The era of British naval supremacy brought about by the victory at Trafalgar lasted for a century until Germany's naval challenge in the first decade of the Twentieth Century.
www.royal-navy.mod.uk /server.php?show=conWebDoc.897&outputFormat=print   (0 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Sir John Fisher's Naval Revolution (Studies in Maritime History): Books: Nicholas A. Lambert
The British government during this period, and the opposition political parties, were intent on reducing British naval expenditures, and not at all interested in developing the ability to expand British ability to project naval force overseas.
The motivations for the growth and posturing of the British Navy prior to WWI had less to do with fear of Germany -although using that fear was an effective tool- than with a naval revolution by the Admiralty's First Lord, Sir John Fisher.
These were small submersible boats and surface craft armed with torpedoes that could close the narrow seas around the British Isles to enemy battle fleets thus freeing the British fleet to roam the high seas, bringing battle to the enemy and protecting her own huge ocean trade.
www.amazon.com /Fishers-Revolution-Studies-Maritime-History/dp/1570032777   (0 words)

  
 Avalanche Press
By the time of the First World War, American naval officers had clustered into two camps: those around William Shepherd Benson, the chief of naval operations, disliked the British and saw them as their navy’s next enemy.
British dominions also drew shades of Red: Canada was Crimson, New Zealand was Garnet, India was Ruby and Australia was Scarlet.
American naval leaders saw this pressure as an attempt to maintain British naval supremacy.
www.avalanchepress.com /gamePlanRed.php   (705 words)

  
 Queen leads British commemoration of 200th anniversary of Trafalgar naval battle - 10/22/05
Bells tolled aboard British vessels around the world and wreaths were laid at the site of the decisive battle just off Cape Trafalgar in southwestern Spain.
The victory by an outnumbered British fleet on Oct. 21, 1805, lifted the threat of invasion by the armies of Napoleon -- who ruled both France and Spain -- and helped ensure Britain's place as the world's dominant naval power.
Spanish Defense Minister Jose Bono led a religious service at a naval base, where descendants of the fleet commanders laid wreaths as choral music was played.
www.detnews.com /2005/nation/0510/22/natio-357366.htm   (0 words)

  
 supremacy - OneLook Dictionary Search
supremacy : The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language [home, info]
Phrases that include supremacy: act of supremacy, borne supremacy, list of machinae supremacy promo songs, machinae supremacy webography, naval supremacy, more...
Words similar to supremacy: domination, mastery, supremacies, more...
www.onelook.com /?loc=rescb&w=supremacy&ls=a   (199 words)

  
 This Day in History 1780: British demonstrate naval supremacy in The Moonlight Battle
The Spanish, who were at war with the British because they had chosen to back the American rebels in the War for Independence, saw the British fleet in pursuit and attempted to retreat home to the port of Cadiz.
As they fled, Rodney decided to ignore the accepted rules of naval engagement, which involved two lines of ships bombarding one another with cannon much like two lines of infantry confronting one another across a battlefield.
Credit for the British victory belongs not only to their greater number of ships and Admiral Rodney’s decision to give chase, but also to the British ships’ barnacle-free copper bottoms, which allowed them to outpace the less technologically advanced Spanish fleet.
www.history.com /tdih.do?action=tdihArticleCategory&id=155   (301 words)

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