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Topic: Bukhori language


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  India, Indian States, India States, Indian hotels, Indian News and Indian Tourism, India Travel
Punjabi is the official language of the Indian state of Punjab and the shared state capital Chandigarh.
It is one of the second official languages of Delhi and Haryana.
Punjabi is the preferred language of the Sikhs, as some of their religious literature is written in it.
www.chandigarhin.com /wiki-Punjabi_language   (1452 words)

  
  Bukhori language Information
It is the primary traditional language of the Bukharan Jews.
Bukhori is based on a substrate of classical Persian, with a large number of Hebrew loanwords, as well as smaller numbers of loanwords from other surrounding languages, including Uzbek and Russian.
Today, the language is spoken by approximately 10,000 Jews remaining in Uzbekistan, although most of its speakers reside elsewhere, predominantly in Israel (approx.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Bukhori_language   (165 words)

  
  Hebrew language Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
In Israel, it is the de facto language of the state and the people, as well as being one of the two official languages (together with Arabic), and is spoken by a majority of the population.
The Canaanite languages are a group within Northwest Semitic, emerging in the 2nd millennium BCE in the Levant, gradually separating from Aramaic and Ugaritic.
The language of the Neo-Babylonian Empire was a dialect of Aramaic.
www.hallencyclopedia.com /Hebrew_language   (6743 words)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Bukhori language
The Yemenite Hebrew language or Temani Hebrew language is a descendant of Biblical Hebrew traditionally used by Yemenite Jews.
The Karaim language is a Turkic language with Hebrew influences, in a similar manner to Yiddish or Ladino.
The language is closely related to Persian; it belongs to the southwestern group of the Iranian division of the Indo-European languages.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Bukhori-language   (1941 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Catalanic
Judeo-Romance languages are those languages derived from Romance languages, spoken by the various Jewish communities, and altered to such an extent to gain recognition as languages in their own right, joining the great number of other Jewish languages.
Languages of Spain The Jewish languages are a set of languages that developed in various Jewish communities, in Europe, southern and south-western Asia, and northern Africa.
Krymchak is the Crimean Tatar language dialect spoken by the Krymchaks - Rabbanite Jews of the Crimea.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Catalanic   (2264 words)

  
 Bukhori language
Bukhori, also known as Bukharic or Bukharan, is an Indo-Iranian language.
It is the primary traditional language of the Bukharan Jews.
Bukhori is based on a substrate of classical Persian, with a large number of Hebrew loanwords, as well as smaller numbers of loanwords from other surrounding languages, including Uzbek and Russian.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/b/bu/bukhori_language.html   (250 words)

  
 Tajik language resources
Language Tajik (Indo-Iranian) Takestani Talossan Talysh (Indo-Iranian) Tamil (Dravidian) Tanacross Tangut (extinct) Tarifit (Berber) Tat Tatar, Kazan Tatar Tausug Tehuelche Telugu (Dravidian) Temiar, Northern Sakai (...
The language has diverged somewhat from Persian as spoken in Afghanistan and Iran, because of political borders and the influence of Russian, although a transcribed Tajik text is easily understood by a native Persian speaker of either Iran or Afghanistan.
The standard language is based on the north-western dialects of Tajik, which have been influenced by the neighbouring Uzbek language as a result of geographical proximity.
www.mongabay.com /indigenous_ethnicities/languages/languages/Tajik.html   (1259 words)

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