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Topic: Bunyoro


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In the News (Sat 25 May 19)

  
  Uganda Connect - Bunyoro-Kitara
Bunyoro Kitara Kingdom in mid-western Uganda lies 1°N to 2°N and 30°45' East to 32°25' East of the Equator.
The economy of Bunyoro Kitara Kingdom thrives on a number of economic activities, prominent among which is large scale commercial farming in tobacco, sugarcane, tea, cereals like maize, rice and ranching.
Bunyoro Kingdom is also blessed with mineral wealth, including oil at the Lake Albert rift valley, gem stones: tourmaline, ruby, red and green garnet, etc, and other minerals, titanium, tin and gold, as well as iron.
www.uconnect.org /bunyoro/index.html   (578 words)

  
  Bunyoro - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Bunyoro rose to power by controlling a number of the holiest shrines in the region, the lucrative Kibiro saltworks of Lake Albert, and having the highest quality of metallurgy in the region.
Bunyoro began to fade in the late eighteenth century due to internal divisions.
However, in 1899 Kaberega was captured and exiled to the Seychelles and Bunyoro was annexed to the British Empire.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Bunyoro   (528 words)

  
 The Head Heeb: The third rail
Imshin reports that the Bunyoro kingdom in Uganda intends to sue Britain in the ICJ for colonial-era atrocities and land confiscations:
"Bunyoro was one of the richest kingdoms in Africa that was plundered and destroyed.
The Bunyoro may be pursuing a legal strategy in order to bring attention to their cause and ratchet up the pressure for a political solution, because neither lawsuit seems likely to succeed.
headheeb.blogmosis.com /archives/022971.html   (531 words)

  
 2. Interlacustrine East Africa. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
Bunyoro armies defeated Buganda and Nkore but fled from latter during an eclipse of the sun.
By end of the period Bunyoro was still the strongest state but was one among many strong states in the region, including Buganda, a former tributary.
Crisis in Bunyoro, leading to decline, based on the opening of kingship candidacy to all sons of the king, which resulted in a series of succession disputes and disintegration.
www.bartleby.com /67/883.html   (320 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Printer-friendly - Uganda
As opposed to the omukama (king) of Bunyoro, who was chosen exclusively from the royal clan and whose chiefs had some independent authority, the kabaka of Buganda could be chosen from any clan.
Several Bunyoro counties were awarded to the Buganda government for its military assistance.
Bunyoro, Ankole, and Toro received only ceremonial privileges, but that was still more than the districts that lay outside the four major kingdoms received.
encarta.msn.com /text_761566572___45/Uganda.html   (3567 words)

  
 mostly AFRICA: Uganda: Bunyoro King suing the Queen of England   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Bunyoro King, Solomon Gafabusa Iguru, is planning to sue the British government for the plunder of his kingdom in the late 1890s.
According to this, the Bunyoro Kingdom is hiring American, Israeli and British lawyers to pursue its suit against the Queen.
Omukama [King] Kabalega of Bunyoro resisted the colonialists until he was defeated in 1901 and exiled to the Seychelles islands in the Indian Ocean.
mostlyafrica.blogspot.com /2004/03/uganda-bunyoro-king-suing-queen-of.html   (371 words)

  
 Uganda - Long-Distance Trade and Foreign Contact
Bunyoro also found itself threatened from the north by Egyptian-sponsored agents who sought ivory and slaves but who, unlike the Arab traders from Zanzibar, were also promoting foreign conquest.
Bunyoro had been spared the religious civil wars of Buganda and was firmly united by its king, Kabarega, who had several regiments of troops armed with guns.
One-half of Bunyoro's conquered territory was awarded to Buganda as well, including the historic heartland of the kingdom containing several Nyoro (Bunyoro) royal tombs.
www.country-data.com /cgi-bin/query/r-14030.html   (1090 words)

  
 myUganda - Uganda's Leading Internet Resource | Uganda's Information Portal
Omukama of Bunyoro - Kitara, Solomon Gafabusa Iguru
The kingdom of Bunyoro continues to be held together by Omukama.
The great potential of Bunyoro is yet to be translated into sound economic gain that will transform the lives of its citizens.
www.myuganda.co.ug /about/peoples/monarchies/bunyoro.php   (880 words)

  
 Uganda - HISTORY
Thus, in Bunyoro, periods of political stability and expansion were interrupted by civil wars and secessions.
The people of Bunyoro were particularly aggrieved, having fought the Baganda and the British; having a substantial section of their heartland annexed to Buganda as the "lost counties;" and finally having "arrogant" Baganda administrators issuing orders, collecting taxes, and forcing unpaid labor.
The vote demonstrated an overwhelming desire by residents in the counties annexed to Buganda in 1900 to be restored to their historic Bunyoro allegiance, which was duly enacted by the new UPC majority despite KY opposition.
www.mongabay.com /reference/country_studies/uganda/HISTORY.html   (13080 words)

  
 New Vision Online : Court to rule on Bunyoro case   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Bunyoro Kingdom jointly sued the governments of Uganda and Britain, the Kabaka and 3,635 absentee landlords who own the disputed land.
Bunyoro is seeking to recover the land comprising of Bugangaizi and Buyaga counties from Buganda and compensation of sh500b for 100 years of economic deprivation and exploitation.
Bunyoro’s press secretary Henry Ford Mirima is behind the case.
www.newvision.co.ug /D/120/13/423590   (178 words)

  
 Explore   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The paper reported that the Omukama [King] of Bunyoro Kingdom in Uganda was considering suing Britain for having colonised and depopulated the Kingdom and taken away its wealth.
Supposing Bunyoro asked them, was it in their -British-interest not to have such a law then, who would be on the wrong.
I forsee that Bunyoro may be intimidated by the so called nation-state (since Britain is part of its serving dish).
www.edirisa.org /inhales/00000009.php   (1927 words)

  
 odiousdebts.org
The coalition of lawyers is expected to bring the UK government to account for the plunder of Bunyoro during Britain's colonial rule of Uganda.
The then King of Bunyoro, King Chwa II Kabalega called the colonial representatives, agents of doom and mobilised his people to reject their invasion.
Bunyoro's claims for compensation come at a time when internationally Africa and her descendants in other parts of the world are demanding for among other things; apologies and reparations from the advanced west.
www.odiousdebts.org /odiousdebts/print.cfm?ContentID=9774   (1325 words)

  
 UPC ..::|::.. Uganda Peoples Congress
Bunyoro however demanded that this transfer must be effected before the start of the Constitutional Conference scheduled for June 12, 1961.
This demand by Bunyoro, coupled with that from Buganda that she would not participate in the conference unless her financial relationship was regularized before then, sparked off speculations about the success of the conference.
Majugo, a member of the Bunyoro delegation, declared on his return to Uganda, that independence day, 9 October, would be "a funeral in Bunyoro" and that Bunyoro would not be part of the independence celebrations.
www.upcparty.net /upcparty/roots_adhola.htm   (18989 words)

  
 Amasaza Ga Buganda   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Most of the surrounding territory was the dominion of the kings of Bunyoro.
Gradually, Buganda was able to expand its territory at the expense of Bunyoro until it grew to the twenty counties that constituted Buganda at its pinnacle.
This was a reward to the rulers of Buganda who had collaborated with the British in their fight against king Kabarega of Bunyoro.
www.buganda.com /masaza.htm   (251 words)

  
 Telegraph | News | African king aims to bankrupt Britain
Solomon I, omukama or king of the Bunyoro kingdom in western Uganda, has never forgiven the British for deposing his grandfather, Kabalega II, and stealing his cattle during a five-year war in the 1890s.
Were the Bunyoro kingdom to win the amount it is claiming it would be the equivalent of every Briton paying out more than £60,000.
But neither Bunyoro's history books nor the case documents show Kabalega, a hero in Uganda for standing up to the British Empire, in a flattering light either.
www.telegraph.co.uk /news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2004/03/13/wsolo13.xml&sSheet=/portal/2004/03/13/ixportal.html   (1139 words)

  
 EnterUganda
It was replaced by Kingdoms of Buganda, Bunyoro, Ankole, Toro and Busoga, and the chieftains of Beni-Butembo and Husi (in Congo); and Karagwe and Buhaya (in Tanzania).
Examples are the Nyangire-Abaganda rebellion of Bunyoro and Ankole, which was against the Baganda chiefs whom the colonial administration deployed in Bunyoro after the fall the fall of the Omukama (king) Kabalega; the Nyabingi cult of Kigezi; the Lamogi of the Lamogi clan of Acholi.
The Mubende-Banyoro Association was formed in 1921 and revived in 1931 by E. Kaliisa to pressurize for the return of Bunyoro's lost counties from Buganda.
www.enteruganda.com /about/history.php   (8018 words)

  
 Bunyoro Federal Revelations
In a strongly worded memorandum appealing to the government and people of Uganda to listen to ‘the unique case of Bunyoro’, the kingdom is asking for affirmative action and redefinition of her boundaries to include the districts of Hoima, Masindi and Kibaale left out of Bunyoro in the 1995 constitution.
The kingdom also wants control and management of the 54% of the land in Bunyoro, which they claim was maliciously gazetted as game and forest reserves by the colonial government.
While defining and giving advantages of federalism in the memorandum, the Bunyoro monarch says their demand for federalism is within a framework of a united and strong country, which is united in diversity for the enjoyment, conservation, and promotion of “our divergent cultural heritages, traditions and values.”
www.federo.com /pages/Bunyoro_Federal_Revelations.htm   (742 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It is important to note that both Toro and Bunyoro had a lot of unoccupied land which was a source of vermin, especially apes, pigs, elephants and buffalos that destroyed crops of the sparsely populated indigenous communities.
In Bunyoro, a number of resettlement schemes were established by the central government both on public land and the land deserted by Baganda landlords.
The situation in Toro and Bunyoro is not due to the land question or crisis but is all about political power and distribution of resources and lack of respect for the law.
www.banyakigezi.org /gen_area/con_2004/leader.htm   (1868 words)

  
 Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute: Kibiro: The Salt of Bunyoro, Past and Present. (book reviews)@ HighBeam ...   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Yet, as the major centre for the extraction of salt for the kingdom of Bunyoro, it was marked on a map even before Gordon (of Khartoum fame) became its first recorded European visitor in 1876.
Europeans were not good news for the inhabitants of Kibiro; Emin Pasha burnt the place down in 1888 and it was torched again in 1894 when the British constructed a fort.
Kibiro was often a target of military activity because Kabarega, the ruler of Bunyoro, fought a determined guerilla war against British...
www.highbeam.com /library/doc0.asp?DOCID=1G1:19735388&refid=ip_encyclopedia_hf   (244 words)

  
 The Ultimate Uganda before 1900 Dog Breeds Information Guide and Reference
The Bito type of state, in contrast with that of the Hima, was established in Bunyoro, which for several centuries was the dominant political power in the region.
Although some of these ambitions might be fulfilled by the Bunyoro Omukama (ruler) granting his kin offices as governors of districts, there was always the danger of coup d'état or secession by overambitious relatives.
The third type of state to emerge in Uganda was that of Buganda, on the northern shores of Lake Victoria.
www.dogluvers.com /dog_breeds/Uganda_before_1900   (2700 words)

  
 The Head Heeb: The lost counties strike again
As every Ugandan knows, the "lost counties" were part of the precolonial Bunyoro kingdom, but were awarded to Buganda by the British in 1886 in return for their help in subduing Bunyoro.
The referendum was held in 1964 and, after the counties voted to return to Bunyoro, soldiers loyal to the Buganda king went on a rampage and brought the country to the verge of civil war.
The traditional ruler of Bunyoro, which was also restored to corporate existence in the 1990s, may also file suit with respect to the Buganda Land Board's ownership of land in the lost counties.
headheeb.blogmosis.com /archives/020935.html   (612 words)

  
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KAMPALA, 10 Mar 2004 (IRIN) - Western Uganda’s Bunyoro Kingdom is preparing to file a case "by the end of March", in which it is seeking compensation from Britain for war crimes allegedly committed by British officers during the colonial era, a spokesman for the kingdom said.
The present king of Bunyoro, Solomon Iguru, wants compensation of nearly £3 billion (US $5.55 billion) from the British government for war crimes allegedly committed against the kingdom of his great grandfather, Kabarega, in 1894 by soldiers under the command of Col Henry Colvile, then commissioner in Uganda.
According to historical records obtained by the committee, the population of Bunyoro dropped from 2 million to less than 100,000 during the period of British occupation, largely due to starvation and sickness arising from neglect.
www.irinnews.org /report.asp?ReportID=39953&SelectRegion=East_Africa&SelectCountry=UGANDA   (1023 words)

  
 empire   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This is the result of many years of orchestrated, intentional and malicious marginalization, dating back to the early colonial days.
The people of Bunyoro, under the reign of the mighty king Cwa II Kabalega, resisted colonial domination.
Colonial efforts to reduce Bunyoro to a non entity were numerous, and continued over a long period of time.
www.bunyoro-kitara.com /empire.htm   (346 words)

  
 Memoirs of the Earl of Listowel: Chapter 13   (Site not responding. Last check: )
There recommendation about the so-called "lost counties of Bunyoro" was to propose a referendum in the disputed areas as:- "this problem is in a class by itself.
These counties were lost to Bunyoro in the wars which preceded the pacification of the Protectorate and were incorporated in Buganda territory under the 1900 Uganda Agreement, to which the British Government was a signatory.
We therefore recommended that the lost counties of Buyaga and Bugangazzi should be transferred to Bunyoro, but there should be no change in the status of the territory to the East of these counties, where the Bagandas were in a majority.
www.redrice.com /listowel/CHAP13.html   (1305 words)

  
 federo - Bunyoro-Kitara - Region of Bunyoro-Kitara
Lugard in 1891 re-established the kingdom of Toro which Kabalega had restored to Bunyoro in 1876 by military victory.
When Lugard installed Kasagama as Omukama of Toro and established Nubian fortifications to cut off Kabalega seven provinces constituting Toro Kingdom and two provinces in Ankole were lost to Bunyoro.
The three provinces in what became Belgian-Congo were lost as a result of Anglo-Belgian frontier adjustments while in 1894 six provinces were ceded to Buganda by the British, precipitating the 'Lost Counties' struggle.
www.federo.com /index.php?id=104   (3487 words)

  
 Bunyoro and Buganda (from Uganda) --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Bunyoro and Buganda (from Uganda) --  Encyclopædia Britannica
The organization of the peoples who came to inhabit the area north of the Nile River was mainly based on their clan structures.
More results on "Bunyoro and Buganda (from Uganda)" when you join.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-37623?tocId=37623   (755 words)

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