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Topic: Butterfly Cluster


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In the News (Sun 21 Jul 19)

  
  Butterfly Cluster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Butterfly Cluster (also known as M6 or NGC 6405) is an open cluster in the constellation of Scorpius.
In color photographs of the Butterfly Cluster this orange star contrasts sharply with its blue neighbours in the cluster.
Estimates of the cluster's distance have varied over the years with a mean value of around 1,600 light years, giving it a spatial dimension of some 12 light years.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Butterfly_Cluster   (255 words)

  
 M6: Butterfly Cluster
M6 is visible to the naked eye, and about 330 stars have been identified in the cluster.
Charles Messier catalogued it in 1764 who described it as "a cluster of small stars between the bow of Sagittarius and the tail of Scorpius.
It was also described by Robert Burnham as a "...charming group whose arrangement suggests the outline of a butterfly with open wings" - hence its popular name.
www.r-clarke.org.uk /messier/m6.htm   (120 words)

  
 Sea and Sky's Astronomy Resources: Messier Objects M1 - M10
M4 is a globular cluster that lies in the constellation of Scorpius.
This cluster is composed mainly of blue and white stars with the brightest being a yellow or orange giant.
Another galactic cluster to be found in the rich hunting grounds of the constellation of Scorpius is M7, also known as Ptolemy's cluster.
www.seasky.org /astronomy/astronomy_messier_1to10.html   (829 words)

  
 Messier Object 6
Open cluster Messier 6 is described by Burnham as a "charming group whose arrangement suggests the outline of a butterfly with open wings."
Thus, Philippe Loys de Chéseaux independently rediscovered it in 1745-46, and was the first to recognize it as "a very fine star cluster." Abbe Lacaille included it in his catalog of 1751-52 as Lac III.12, and Charles Messier eventually cataloged it on May 23, 1764.
The brightest star in this cluster is the variable star BM Scorpii = HD 160371, a yellow or orange supergiant (spectral type K0-K3 Ib), a semiregular veriable of type SRd, with its apparent magnitude varying between mag 5.5 and 7.
www.seds.org /messier/m/m006.html   (515 words)

  
 Astronomy Online - Messier Objects
M9 - a globular cluster in the constellation Ophiuchus.
M12 - "Gumball Cluster" a globular cluster in the constellation Ophiuchus.
M53 - a globular cluster in the constellation Coma Berenices.
astronomyonline.org /Astrophotography/Messier_complete.asp   (1478 words)

  
 GCSE Astronomy - Messier Objects
One of the brightest galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, with a magnitude of 8.5.
Majority opinion seems to be that it is a (sparsely-populated) globular cluster, without the bright core typical of such objects.
Spiral Galaxy Type Sa Appears to be a part of the Virgo Cluster although not situted near the main concentration.
members.tripod.com /~BDaugherty/gcseAstronomy/messier.html   (1427 words)

  
 M 6
The diameter of this star cluster is some 20 light years, with an estimated average density of 0.6 star per cubic parsec.
The brightest star in this cluster is a yellow or orange giant (spectral type K0-K3) of apparent magnitude 6.17 (the most left of the 4 bright stars forming the remarkable quadrangle of approximate parallelogram shape in our photo), while the hottest stars are blue main sequence stars of spectral type B4-B5.
Of all Messier objects, M6 is situated at the closest angular distance from the Galactic Center, which is located in the constellation Sagittarius but very near to the 3-constellation edge of Sagittarius, Scorpius and Ophiuchus.
www.messiermarathon.com /new_page_12.htm   (248 words)

  
 Jeff Burton's Astronomy Blog
M6 was recognized as a cluster by Hodierna prior to 1654 but was recognized by Ptolemy along with M7 in the 2nd century B.C. as two "small clouds" near the sting of the scorpion.
M6 is also known as "The Butterfly Cluster" because of its distinctive "pinch" in the middle.
An arrangement of stars resembling the wings and antennae of a butterfly was very evident near the center of the cluster.
x.astrogeek.org /observations/log.php?object_id=18   (413 words)

  
 NCKAS -Open Clusters
The clusters are over 7,000 light years distant toward the constellation of Perseus, but are separated by only hundreds of light years.
The two close bright stars in the middle of the cluster is a type O double star SZ Cam.
These clusters are magnificent viewed with wide-field as a pair, or viewed separately under higher magnification and smaller field of view.
www.nckas.org /openclusters   (1812 words)

  
 IceInSpace - Australian Amateur Astronomy, News and Forums | Observing Challenge | Challenge Objects - July 2005
M6, also known as NGC6405 or the “Butterfly cluster”, and is visible to the naked eye in the constellation Scorpius.
It is described by Burnham as a "charming group whose arrangement suggests the outline of a butterfly with open wings".
The cluster is made up of approximately 80 stars spread over a region about 54 arcmin in diameter, and the visually most conspicuous star is a rather reddish slow, semiregular variable BM Scorpii (HD 160371), a yellow or orange supergiant (spectral type K0-K3 Ib).
www.iceinspace.com.au /index.php?id=69,217,0,0,1,0   (1314 words)

  
 M6
Messier object M6 is a open cluster which is located in the constellation Scorpius.
This Open Cluster has an apparent angular size of 15 and a visual brightness of 5.3.
It is commonly known as the Butterfly Cluster.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /messier_objects/m6.htm   (75 words)

  
 Getting Started: Butterfly Farms - Jul. 23, 2001
The butterfly is an insect like no other: its fragile beauty has turned it into a symbol of both joy and hope.
In fact, the market for butterflies has grown so rapidly in the past 20 years that there are now 157 professional butterfly farmers in the United States alone.
In addition to selling butterflies to party givers, many farmers also supply the zoos and museums with fluttering butterflies for their live exhibits.
money.cnn.com /2001/07/23/sbstarting/q_butterfly   (1106 words)

  
 Joe Fragola; Globulars Great and Small
M80 (globular cluster); Scorpius - this is a tiny globular cluster compared to one like M13; the globular is located near the “head” of Scorpius between Antares and the “claws”; it sits in a nice FOV which I made a rough sketch of in my handwritten notes; can resolve stars at 100x magnification.
M12 (globular cluster); Ophiuchus - this target sits in a nice FOV - it lies at the W edge of a diamond or parallogram (a mini-Lyra) of 10th magnitude stars with a larger diamond also in the 25mm FOV to the E; lots of stars resolved in the 12.5mm view at 100x.
M69 (globular cluster); Sagittarius - this one was harder to find than expected; it’s located within the “teapot” asterism of Sagittarius in the same finder FOV as 2nd magnitude Epsilon Sagittarii; there was not much detail at 50x; a bit more detail, but not much at 100x.
observers.org /reports/2003.07.05.3.html   (1395 words)

  
 BinoSky: A guide to astronomy with binoculars.
47 Tucanae (NGC 104, a globular cluster in Tucana)
Butterfly Cluster (M6, an open cluster in Scorpius)
NGC104 (47 Tucanae, a globular cluster in Tucana)
www.lightandmatter.com /binosky/binosky.html   (804 words)

  
 RedOrbit - Reference Library
Butterfly Cluster -- To some, the outline of the open cluster of stars M6 resembles a butterfly.
M6 can best be seen in a dark sky with binoculars towards the constellation of Scorpius, coving about as much of the sky as the full moon.
Like other open clusters, M6 is composed predominantly of young blue stars, although the brightest star is nearly orange.
www.redorbit.com /education/reference_library/?article_id=27   (159 words)

  
 O.R.S.A.'S Astronomy Pages: M6
Messier found it in 1764, and described it as "a cluster of small stars between the bow of Sagittarius and the tail of Scorpius.
Wallenquist in 1959 identified, in in a field of 54', almost 80 members of the cluster, with a central density of about 25 stars in a cubic parsec, and about 0.6 stars per cubic parsec for the over-all density of the whole cluster.
A study made at Harvard's Boyden Observatory in South Africa in 1958 shows that great majority of the members are B-type main sequence stars, with the exception of the brightest, wich is a yellow giant.
www.orsapa.it /english/catalog/m006.htm   (432 words)

  
 Butterfly Cluster (M6, NGC 6405) (via CobWeb/3.1 planetlab2.tamu.edu)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Butterfly Cluster (M6, NGC 6405) (via CobWeb/3.1 planetlab2.tamu.edu)
An open cluster in the constellation Scorpius, 4° northwest of M7 (Ptolemy's Cluter), that contains about 80 stars roughly in the shape of a butterfly.
Its most conspicuous star is an orange giant K star of magnitude 6.2.
www.daviddarling.info.cob-web.org:8888 /encyclopedia/B/Butterfly_Cluster.html   (130 words)

  
 Common Names for Messier Objects
M76 (also Little Dumbbell Nebula, Butterfly Nebula, or Cork Nebula).
Cluster of young stars in M42, the Orion Nebula
M87 in the center of the Virgo cluster.
www.seds.org /messier/m-names.html   (735 words)

  
 M6 The Butterfly Cluster NGC 6405   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Easily visible to the naked eye, M6 is a suberb object for a small telescope.
The main stars are quite bright and bluish, and form a distinct outline of a butterfly with wings outstretched.
In an 8" telescope at low magnification, the cluster is a facinating sight.
www.montgomerycollege.edu /faculty/~mclark/public_html/m6.htm   (56 words)

  
 Summer Sky Tour: Hercules   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Globular clusters are rare - only about 150 are known, and they are completely different from open clusters like the Butterfly Cluster that we saw in Scorpius.
The Butterfly is estimated to be about 100 million years old, M13 is estimated at about 10 BILLION years old, making it so old that it formed before the disk of the Milky Way galaxy formed!
The Butterfly cluster is about 1200 light-years away and about 20 light-years across, M13 is 20,000 light-years away and 160 light-years across.
my.execpc.com /60/B3/culp/astronomy/Summer/hercules.html   (288 words)

  
 Summer Sky Tour: Scorpius   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Open clusters, also called 'galactic' clusters, are small groups of stars, maybe a hundred or so, that formed from the same (huge) cloud of gas and dust.
These two clusters are good examples, most of the brightest stars are blue ones.
M6 is sometimes called the "Butterfly Cluster" because it looks like a butterfly with its wings open (flying toward the East).
my.execpc.com /60/B3/culp/astronomy/Summer/scorpius.html   (896 words)

  
 APOD: January 6, 1999 - M6: The Butterfly Cluster   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
open cluster of stars M6 resembles a butterfly.
open clusters, M6 is composed predominantly of young blue stars, although the brightest star is nearly orange.
antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov /apod/ap990106.html   (120 words)

  
 Monarch butterflies
Excellent photos of male and female butterflies and the monarch life cycle.
A national site "dedicated to education, conservation, and research" for the monarch butterfly.
Pages to print out and color, all with a generic butterfly theme.
www.acu.edu /academics/library/govdoc/monarch.html   (276 words)

  
 Star Reporter: A rare sight in southern sky this month - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
You may never see it in nature, but cast your eyes to the southern sky this month and you'll see a butterfly sitting on the tail of a scorpion.
Both star clusters aren't difficult to find with binoculars, but you may be able to see the somewhat-brighter Ptolemy's Cluster without optical aid.
But if constellations and star clusters aren't your thing, there are some planetary happenings of note at the end of the month.
www.pittsburghlive.com /x/pittsburghtrib/s_367741.html   (505 words)

  
 M1 - M30
The Butterfly Cluster: a naked eye object: and ideal for binocular observation
The Wild Duck Cluster: A splendid object in a small telescope, slightly V shaped like a flock of flying ducks: binoculars show it as a misty patch of light
The Great Cluster in Hercules: the brightest globular cluster in the northern skies: visible to the naked eye but in binoculars you could easily mistake it for a star.
www.skymapper.co.uk /html/cm1.html   (341 words)

  
 M6   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
M6 is an open star cluster located near the tail of Scorpius about 3-1/2 degrees northwest of M7.
Although M6 is visible to the naked eye, P.L. de Cheseaux is credited with discovery of M6 in 1746, and he was the first to identify it as a star cluster.
M6 is known as the Butterfly Cluster, because the arrangement of this group of stars suggests the outline of a butterfly with open wings.
members.cox.net /~k5xi/m6.htm   (108 words)

  
 Butterfly Life Cycle Mobile - KinderCrafts
A cluster of butterfly eggs are usually laid on the underside of a leaf; the eggs are white or yellow or greenish, and are circular to oval.
To make butterfly wings, fold a small piece of paper in half, and draw half a butterfly along the fold line.
Staple or tape the stages in the butterfly's life cycle to string and then to the paper plate.
www.zoomschool.com /crafts/butterfly/lifecyclemobile   (312 words)

  
 Tracy's Stained Glass Workshop - Glassmith Studios 3-Butterfly Bevel Cluster
Bevels / Bevel Clusters → Glassmith Studios → Glassmith Studios 3-Butterfly Bevel Cluster
From Glassmith Studios, these Butterflies are 3 sets of 4-piece clusters, or 12 total pieces.
Each butterfly is a different color: blue, clear, and green.
www.tracysworkshop.com /pc-1785-16835-3-butterfly-cluster.aspx   (474 words)

  
 Constellation Report
Let's start with the Globular Cluster M4 (mag 6.0).This awesome shot was taken by Al Kelly.
Also known as The Butterfly Cluster, M6 is an impressive sight.
The cluster to the upper right is M6, while the cluster towards the bottom is M7.
www.utahskies.org /deepsky/constellations/scorpius.html   (574 words)

  
 Become.com - Shop results for butterfly cluster
Each butterfly cluster is 4" wide and 2-3/4" tall.
Fluttering on brilliant wings monarch butterflies make the long migration from Canada to Mexico where they spend the winter in the oyamel or fir...
They cluster on rocks and stones depicted in a stunning tapestry...
www.become.com /shop?q=butterfly+cluster   (228 words)

  
 [No title]
pB, L, R. At 72x, slightly brighter core with a chain of stars running down the center of the cluster.
Does not appear as bright or large as M5.
Beautiful open cluster w/ perhaps 2 to 3 dozen bright including a bright yellow star to the southwest, w/ 16mm @ 59x.
home1.gte.net /~whd/Scorpius.htm   (257 words)

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