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Topic: Byzantine Empire


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  Byzantine Empire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Byzantine Empire (native Greek name: Βασιλεία τῶν Ρωμαίων - Basileia tōn Romaiōn) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire of the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople.
The Eastern Roman Empire was largely spared the difficulties of the west in the 3rd and 4th centuries (see Crisis of the Third Century) in part because urban culture was better established there and the initial invasions were attracted to the wealth of Rome.
The Hunnic Empire collapsed and Constantinople was free from the menace of Attila.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Byzantine_Empire   (11796 words)

  
 Byzantine Empire - Crystalinks
The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centred at its capital in Constantinople.
The Byzantine Empire was the empire that brought widespread adoption of Christianity to Europe - arguably one of the central aspects of a modern Europe¹s identity.
Byzantine art is generally taken to include the arts of the Byzantine Empire from the foundation of the new capital of Constantinople (now Istanbul) in AD 330 in ancient Byzantium to the capture of the city by the Ottoman Turks in 1453.
www.crystalinks.com /byzantine.html   (7085 words)

  
 Byzantine Empire - MSN Encarta
The terms Byzantine Empire (a historiographical term used since the 19th century) and Eastern Roman Empire are expressions used to describe the Roman Empire of the Middle Ages...
Byzantine Empire, eastern part of the Roman Empire, which survived after the breakup of the Western Empire in the 5th century ad.
Meanwhile, the Byzantines lost their last foothold in Italy and were alienated from the Christian West by a schism (1054) between the Orthodox church and the papacy.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761561530/Byzantine_Empire.html   (1167 words)

  
 HighBeam Encyclopedia - Byzantine Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The reconstructed empire was soon attacked from all sides, notably by Charles I of Naples, by Venice, by the Ottoman Turks, by the new kingdoms of Serbia and Bulgaria, and by Catalonian adventurers under Roger de Flor.
The collapse of the empire opened the way for the vast expansion of the Ottoman Empire to Vienna itself and also enabled Ivan III of Russia, son-in-law of Constantine XI, to claim a theoretical succession to the imperial title.
Decline Of The Byzantine Empire: Ravages Of Roger Of Sicily
www.encyclopedia.com /html/B/ByzantinE1mp.asp   (1440 words)

  
 Byzantine Empire - Phantis
The term Byzantine Empire was invented in 1557, about a century after the fall of Constantinople by German historian Hieronymus Wolf, who introduced a system of Byzantine historiography in his work Corpus Historiae Byzantinae in order to distinguish ancient Roman from medieval Greek history without drawing attention to their ancient predecessors.
Byzantines identified themselves as Romaioi (Ρωμαίοι - Romans) which had already become a synonym for a Hellene (Έλλην - Greek), and more than ever before were developing a national consciousness, as residents of Ρωμανία (Romania, as the Byzantine state and its world were called).
The empire was also by now noticeably different in religion from the former imperial lands in western Europe, although the southern Byzantine provinces differed significantly from the north in culture and practiced Monophysite Christianity rather than Chalcedonian Orthodox.
wiki.phantis.com /index.php/Byzantine_Empire   (3669 words)

  
 Byzantine Empire. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-07
The remainder of the empire broke into independent states, notably the empires of Nicaea and of Trebizond and the despotate of Epirus.
The reconstructed empire was soon attacked from all sides, notably by Charles I of Naples, by Venice, by the Ottoman Turks, by the new kingdoms of Serbia and Bulgaria, and by Catalonian adventurers under Roger de Flor.
The collapse of the empire opened the way for the vast expansion of the Ottoman Empire to Vienna itself and also enabled Ivan III of Russia, son-in-law of Constantine XI, to claim a theoretical succession to the imperial title.
www.bartleby.com /65/by/ByzantinEmp.html   (1302 words)

  
 Byzantine Empire - All About Turkey
The Byzantine Empire is also known as the Eastern Roman Empire, for it was in fact a continuation of the Roman Empire into its eastern part.
For 1100 years, the Byzantine's were able to maintain control of their empire, although somewhat tenuously at times; the Empire's expansion and prosperity were balanced by internal religious schisms (such as Nika Riot) and recurring wars with enemies from the outside.
The Byzantine Empire, however, had left its mark on the culture, never to be entirely erased even after the Conquest.
www.allaboutturkey.com /bizans.htm   (423 words)

  
 Byzantine Empire Project | The Byzantine Empire
The Byzantine Empire was established with the foundation of Constantinople, but the final separation of the eastern and western empires was not complete until the late fifth century.
With its political structure anchored in Greek tradition and a new religion stimulated by Greek philosophy, the Byzantine Empire survived a millennium of triumphs and declines until Constantinople fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.
Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire of the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople.
www.byzantine.quickonthenet.com   (751 words)

  
 The Byzantine Empire, Early Russia, and Muslim Expansion
The empire was then confronted with a new enemy that of Islam and Arabs attacked the Byzantine empire and by the middle of the seventh century they had subjugated Palestine, Syria, Persia, Egypt and most of Northern Africa.
The empire reached a high point under Basil II who ruled from 976 to 1025 and in these years the Byzantine military finally crushed their Bulgarian foes and on one occasion purposely blinded 15,000 Bulgarian prisoners and sent them home wit the aid of a handful of guides who were left with one eye.
The Byzantine empire was anything but politically stable and during the 1000 years of its existence it experienced 65 revolutions and the abdication or assassination of 60 emperors.
www.emayzine.com /lectures/byzmuslm.html   (3998 words)

  
 Royalty.nu - Eastern Roman Empire - The Byzantine Empire - Emperors of Byzantium
Notable Byzantine empresses include Justinian's wife Theodora, who fully shared her husband's power, and Irene, who ruled during the time of Charlemagne and became a saint of the Greek Orthodox Church.
Argues that the Crusades began in the seventh century with the conquest by the Persians of the Byzantine Empire.
Tells the full story of the Byzantine Empire, from the days when it was barely clinging to survival until its last emperor died fighting on the ramparts.
www.royalty.nu /history/empires/Byzantine/index.html   (2431 words)

  
 The Byzantines
In the latter decades of the fifth century, the Byzantine Emperor declared himself to be a Monophysite—this estranged the Byzantines from the Roman Pope.
The greatest of Byzantine writers, in fact, was the historian Anna Comnena, the daughter of the emperor Alexius.
The Russian rulers assumed the title of "Caesar," the title bestowed on Byzantine emperors—in Russian, the word is "Tsar." With the government centered in Moscow, the Russian Tsars declared Moscow to be the "third Rome," after Rome and Byzantium, and so located themselves in a cultural and historical trajectory that began with the Roman empire.
www.wsu.edu /~dee/MA/BYZ.HTM   (2634 words)

  
 Byzantium
The Byzantine Empire made great contributions to civilization: Greek language and learning were preserved for posterity; the Roman imperial system was continued and Roman law codified; the Greek Orthodox church converted some Slavic peoples and fostered the development of a splendid new art dedicated to the glorification of the Christian religion.
The emperor was concerned that icons played too prominent a role in Byzantine life and that their common use as godparents, witnesses at weddings, and objects of adoration violated the Old Testament prohibition of the worship of graven images.
In contrast to the Christians, both Roman and Byzantine, who were intolerant of religious differences, the Turks allowed monotheists, or any of the believers in a "religion of the book" (the Bible, Torah, or Koran), to retain their faith and be ruled by a religious superior through the millet system, a network of religious ghettoes.
www.yasou.org /byzantium/byz.htm   (10267 words)

  
 Byzantium: The Byzantine Studies Page
Following massive Turkish attacks in the late eleventh century, the Empire was able to maintain a lesser but still significant political and military power under the Komnenian Dynasty: the cost was a social transformation which exalted a powerful military aristocracy, and gradually enserfed the previously free peasantry.
As a result Byzantine culture was subjected to centuries of abuse as a time of barbarism and superstition.
The counterpart to the dismissal of Byzantine culture was its exaltation by 19th-century Romanticism, and by a substrate of Christian, especially Anglican, intellectuals.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/byzantium   (1791 words)

  
 History of Greece. Greek history including the aegean civilisation, byzantine, hellinistic period
In 330 A.D. Emperor Constantine moved the Capital of the Roman Empire to Constantinople, founding the Eastern Roman Empire which was renamed Byzantine Empire or Byzantium for short, by western historians in the 19th century.Byzantium transformed the linguistic heritage of Ancient Greece into a vehicle for the new Christian civilization.
The Byzantine Empire fell to the Turks in 1453 and the Greeks remained under the Ottoman yoke for nearly 400 years.
The empire of the Palaeologi was, in fact, nothing more than a national Greek state which, under attack from the Serbs, Bulgarians and Turks was obliged to abandon the dream of empire and barricade itself behind a national idea in order to defend what had remained of Hellenism.
www.greece-travel.gr /history.htm   (2532 words)

  
 The Byzantines
In the latter decades of the fifth century, the Byzantine Emperor declared himself to be a Monophysite—this estranged the Byzantines from the Roman Pope.
The greatest of Byzantine writers, in fact, was the historian Anna Comnena, the daughter of the emperor Alexius.
The Russian rulers assumed the title of "Caesar," the title bestowed on Byzantine emperors—in Russian, the word is "Tsar." With the government centered in Moscow, the Russian Tsars declared Moscow to be the "third Rome," after Rome and Byzantium, and so located themselves in a cultural and historical trajectory that began with the Roman empire.
www.wsu.edu:8080 /~dee/MA/BYZ.HTM   (2634 words)

  
 Lawler - Encyclopedia of the Byzantine Empire
Combined with the fact that the capital, Constantinople, sat at a strategic military and commercial location, in many ways, the Byzantine Empire was truly the center of the world, influencing regions beyond its borders, even after it had passed its peak.
The connection with the Byzantine Empire is an important aspect of this book simply because it is not always clear.
Then comments that the empire was divided among 3 sons (lands were given to his four sons, but the empire remained united) and "lost its greatest" (P. Lawler overlooks that the fact that the Mongols continued to expand well after 1227, the death of Chinggis Khan) and reached its zenith in the 1250s.
www.deremilitari.org /REVIEWS/Lawler_ByzEncyl.htm   (1191 words)

  
 Open Directory - Society: History: By Time Period: Middle Ages: Byzantine Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Byzantine Glory - A presentation of the history, art, culture, and heritage of the empire.
Byzantine Studies at the University of Notre Dame - An introduction to the field, annotated bibliographies and translations of primary and secondary literature.
Byzantium - Life in the Byzantine Empire, from the foundation of Constantinople in 330 until its fall to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.
dmoz.org /Society/History/By_Time_Period/Middle_Ages/Byzantine_Empire   (619 words)

  
 Bulgarian History and Culture
Under Khan Kroum (803-814 AD) Bulgaria bordered with the empire of Carl the Great to the west, and to the east the Bulgarian troops reached the walls of Constantinople, the capital of the Byzantine Empire.
During the reign of Simeon's successors, Bulgaria was weakened by internal struggles, the heresy of the priest Bogomil spread and influenced the teachings of the Cathars and Albigenses in Western Europe.
This weakened the country and it was conquered by the Ottoman Empire in 1396.
www.bulgariandreams.com /Bulgaria-tourist-information/history-culture.htm   (1785 words)

  
 12 Byzantine Rulers: The History of The Byzantine Empire - Anders.com
By the middle of the 5th Century the Roman Empire was on the verge of collapse.
As the 6th Century dawned on the tottering Byzantine State, the future seemed to hold only decline and decay, and yet unexpectedly, it was to see a renaissance unmatched in the long history of the empire.
Basil I was hardly a promising candidate to usher in a new golden age to the Byzantine Empire.
www.anders.com /lectures/lars_brownworth/12_byzantine_rulers   (3171 words)

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