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Topic: C reactive protein


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In the News (Thu 23 May 19)

  
 C-reactive protein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
CRP was originally discovered by Tillett and Francis in 1930 as a substance in the serum of patients with acute inflammation that reacted with the C polysaccharide of pneumococcus.
CRP is a member of the class of acute phase reactants as its levels rise dramatically during inflammatory processes occurring in the body.
CRP is used mainly as a marker of inflammation.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/C-reactive_protein   (788 words)

  
 MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: C-reactive protein
C-reactive protein is a test that measures the concentration of a protein in serum that indicates acute inflammation.
CRP is detected with the use of antiserum (serum that contains antibodies for a particular antigen) in several tests that measure the protein and protein-bound molecules.
The most important role of CRP is its interaction with the complement system, which is one of the body's immunologic defense mechanisms.
www.nlm.nih.gov /medlineplus/ency/article/003356.htm   (689 words)

  
 C-Reactive Protein
A two-site immunoradiometric assay for C-reactive protein in serum.
The increasing interest in the measurement of serum C-reactive protein in relation to the risk stratification of patients with chest pain has demonstrated the need for more sensitive routine methods of measurement and an accurate definition of the reference range.
The median CRP approximately doubled with age, from approximately 1 mg/L in the youngest decade to approximately 2 mg/L in the oldest, and tended to be higher in females.
www.thedoctorsdoctor.com /labtests/crp.htm   (6123 words)

  
 bodye.com Archived Reports
It has also been shown that not only is C-reactive protein an inflammatory marker and predictor of cardiovascular disease, but it also serves as a warning sign for the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease and other forms of senile dementia associated with the presence of vascular inflammation.
One study showed that men with high C-reactive protein have three times the risk of developing dementias, and that that risk is predicted years before clinical symptoms appear by elevated C-reactive protein.
Those with the highest levels of C-reactive protein have five times the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, and seven times the risk of having a heart attack or stroke compared to subjects with normal levels.
www.bodye.com /reports/creactive.htm   (2003 words)

  
 HAPS - Education Information - C Reactive Protein
CRP is exclusively made in the liver and is secreted in increased amounts within 6 hours of an acute inflammatory stimulus.
CRP is superior to ESR in terms of rapidity of response and specificity for inflammation.
Serial CRP measurements are important adjuncts to the use of temperature charts in clinical practice, as CRP levels are not affected by drug therapy or thermoregulatory factors.
www.haps.nsw.gov.au /edrsrch/edinfo/crp.html   (850 words)

  
 CRP: The Test
The CRP test is sometimes used in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and some forms of arthritis and autoimmune diseases to assess how active the inflammation is and to monitor the treatment.
Because CRP increases in cases of inflammation, the test is ordered when acute inflammation is a risk (such as from an infection after surgery) or suspected based on patient symptoms.
CRP also is used to monitor wound healing and to monitor patients who have surgical cuts (incisions), organ transplants, or burns as an early detection system for possible infections.
www.labtestsonline.org /understanding/analytes/crp/test.html   (447 words)

  
 C-Reactive Protein
Measuring the levels of C-reactive protein in the body is considered an effective way to track the progress of certain diseases or treatments.
C-reactive protein is a plasma protein that is created in the liver.
The level of C-reactive protein created within the body is different from person to person.
www.primev.com /c-reactive-protein.html   (270 words)

  
 C-reactive protein definition - Heart Disease and other cardiovascular conditions on MedicineNet.com
CRP is therefore a test of value in medicine, reflecting the presence and intensity of inflammation, although an elevation in C-reactive protein is not the telltale diagnostic sign of any one condition.
C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the plasma proteins known as acute- phase proteins: proteins whose plasma concentrations increase (or decrease) by 25% or more during inflammatory disorders.
CRP was found to be the only marker of inflammation that independently predicts the risk of a heart attack.
www.medterms.com /script/main/art.asp?articlekey=8425   (406 words)

  
 Inflammation, Heart Disease and Stroke: The Role of C-Reactive Protein
C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the acute phase proteins that increase during systemic inflammation.
It’s been suggested that testing CRP levels in the blood may be a new way to assess cardiovascular disease risk.  A high sensitivity assay for CRP test (hs-CRP) is now widely available.
If a person’s cardiovascular risk score — judged by global risk assessment — is low (the possibility of developing cardiovascular disease is less than 10 percent in 10 years, no test is immediately warranted.
www.americanheart.org /presenter.jhtml?identifier=4648   (801 words)

  
 C-Reactive Protein
Blood samples from the participants showed significantly higher C-reactive protein levels in the group diagnosed with advanced macular degeneration, and CRP levels displayed significant association with the presence of both intermediate and advanced stages of ARMD.
CRP is responsible for the healing benefit of inflammation that occurs when a part of the body is in trouble.
Those subjects with highest CRP levels had a 65 percent increased risk of macular degeneration compared to those with the lowest CRP levels.
www.mdsupport.org /library/c-reactive.html   (211 words)

  
 C-REACTIVE PROTEIN
C-reactive protein is produced by the liver during periods of inflammation.
A positive C-reactive protein may also be seen in the later half of pregnancy and in some who are taking birth control pills.
Normally C-reactive protein should be negative in the bloodstream.
www.medhelp.org /glossary2/new/GLS_0944.HTM   (128 words)

  
 Calcium-Dependent Binding of Rabbit C-Reactive Protein to Supported Lipid Monolayers Containing Exposed Phosphorylcholine Group -- Sui et al. 76 (1): 333 -- Biophysical Journal
The interaction of rabbit C-reactive protein (rCRP) with a supported monolayer containing a phosphorylcholine moiety was studied.
Calcium-Dependent Binding of Rabbit C-Reactive Protein to Supported Lipid Monolayers Containing Exposed Phosphorylcholine Group -- Sui et al.
C. Thomas, V. Anbazhagan, M. Ramakrishnan, N. Sultan, I. Surolia, and M. Swamy
www.biophysj.org /cgi/content/abstract/76/1/333   (311 words)

  
 Plasma C-Reactive Protein Levels in Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis -- Dalton et al. 33 (4): 435 -- Annals of Clinical and Laboratory Science
Plasma C-Reactive Protein Levels in Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis -- Dalton et al.
A patient with urgency, frequency, and low serum C reactive protein concentration
CRP was significantly but transiently elevated in 4 of the patients
www.annclinlabsci.org /cgi/content/abstract/33/4/435   (292 words)

  
 Calzyme - Manufacturers of Enzymes , Proteins , Coenzymes , Substrates and Related Biochemicals
Calzyme - Manufacturers of Enzymes, Proteins, Coenzymes, Substrates and Related Biochemicals
Product price, specification, warranty and availability subject to change without notice.
www.calzyme.com   (32 words)

  
 C-Reactive Protein
A two-site immunoradiometric assay for C-reactive protein in serum.
METHODS: C-reactive protein and LDL cholesterol were measured at base line in 27,939 apparently healthy American women, who were then followed for a mean of eight years for the occurrence of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, coronary revascularization, or death from cardiovascular causes.
Cardiac troponin T and C-reactive protein for predicting prognosis, coronary atherosclerosis, and cardiomyopathy in patients undergoing long-term hemodialysis.
www.thedoctorsdoctor.com /labtests/crp.htm   (6123 words)

  
 C-reactive Protein and Resources
C-reactive protein is a test that measures the concentration of a protein in serum that indicates acute...
C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the acute phase proteins that increase during systemic inflammation...
C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant...
www.proteinbooth.com /res/1/c-reactive-protein.html   (669 words)

  
 NEJM -- C-Reactive Protein and Other Circulating Markers of Inflammation in the Prediction of Coronary Heart Disease
C reactive protein levels are increased in non-allergic but not allergic asthma: a multicentre epidemiological study.
Kistorp, C., Raymond, I., Pedersen, F., Gustafsson, F., Faber, J., Hildebrandt, P. N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide, C-Reactive Protein, and Urinary Albumin Levels as Predictors of Mortality and Cardiovascular Events in Older Adults.
C-Reactive Protein Levels and Outcomes after Statin Therapy.
content.nejm.org /cgi/content/short/350/14/1387   (2955 words)

  
 MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: C-reactive protein
C-reactive protein is a test that measures the concentration of a protein in serum that indicates acute inflammation.
C-reactive protein is a special type of protein produced by the liver that is only present during episodes of acute inflammation.
CRP is detected with the use of antiserum (serum that contains antibodies for a particular antigen) in several tests that measure the protein and protein-bound molecules.
www.nlm.nih.gov /medlineplus/ency/article/003356.htm   (689 words)

  
 PRO Chemical & Dye Directions
It also dyes protein fibers -- wool and silk using acid at a boil or with steam.
It also dyes protein fibers -- wool and silk -- using acid at a boil or with steam.
Vat Dyes are a unique class of dye, similar to indigo, which go through a process of reduction to get on the fiber and then oxidation to become fixed on the fiber.
www.prochemical.com /directions.htm   (1940 words)

  
 DrexlerNanotechnology81PNAS
Still, the synthetic abilities of protein machines will be limited by their need for a moderate temperature aqueous environment (although applied forces can sometimes replace or exceed thermal agitation as a source of activation energy and reaction sites and reactive groups can be protected from the surrounding water, as in some enzymatic active sites).
Protein engineers, exploiting their freedom of design, can work with sequences artificially selected for superior predictability and stability of folding.
Engineers (in contrast to scientists) need not seek to understand all proteins but only enough to produce useful systems in a reasonable number of attempts.
www.imm.org /PNAS.html   (4296 words)

  
 MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: C-reactive protein
C-reactive protein is a test that measures the concentration of a protein in serum that indicates acute inflammation.
C-reactive protein is a special type of protein produced by the liver that is only present during episodes of acute inflammation.
CRP is detected with the use of antiserum (serum that contains antibodies for a particular antigen) in several tests that measure the protein and protein-bound molecules.
www.nlm.nih.gov /medlineplus/ency/article/003356.htm   (689 words)

  
 Anti-Oxidant Enzymes: Superoxide Dismutases (SOD1, SOD2, SOD3), Cu-Chaperone protein for SOD (CCS), Glutathione Peroxidase (GPX1) and Catalase Proteins and Antibodies,
Anti-Oxidant Enzymes: Superoxide Dismutases (SOD1, SOD2, SOD3), Cu-Chaperone protein for SOD (CCS), Glutathione Peroxidase and Catalase
Anti-Oxidant Enzymes: Superoxide Dismutases (SOD1, SOD2, SOD3), Cu-Chaperone protein for SOD (CCS),
GPX is one of only a few proteins known in higher vertebrates to contain selenocysteine.
www.4adi.com /flr/sodflr.html   (689 words)

  
 Effects of Cholesterol and Inflammation-Sensitive Plasma Proteins on Incidence of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in Men -- Engström et al. 105 (22): 2632 -- Circulation
Measurement of C-reactive protein for the targeting of statin therapy in the primary prevention of acute coronary events.
Effect of statin therapy on C-reactive protein levels: the pravastatin inflammation/CRP evaluation (PRINCE): a randomized trial and cohort study.
Influence of plasma fibrinogen levels on the incidence of myocardial infarction and death is modified by other inflammation-sensitive proteins: a long-term cohort study.
circ.ahajournals.org /cgi/content/full/105/22/2632   (2955 words)

  
 Shear-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in endothelial cells requires Rac1-dependent production of ROS -- Yeh et al. 276 (4): 838 -- AJP - Cell Physiology
Cyclic strain-induced monocyte chemotactic protein-1 gene expression in endothelial cells involves reactive oxygen species activation of activator protein 1.
Reactive oxygen species are involved in shear stress-induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in endothelial cells.
Shear stress increases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, and increase is counteracted by prior exposure of endothelial cells to antioxidant N -acetylcysteine (NAC).
ajpcell.physiology.org /cgi/content/full/276/4/C838   (2955 words)

  
 Reactive oxygen species are critical mediators of coronary collateral development in a canine model -- Gu et al. 285 (4): 1582 -- AJP - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Role of reactive oxygen species in bradykinin-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase and c- fos induction in vascular cells.
Reactive oxygen intermediates induce monocyte chemotactic protein-1 in vascular endothelium after brief ischemia.
Reactive oxygen species are critical mediators of coronary collateral development in a canine model -- Gu et al.
ajpheart.physiology.org /cgi/content/full/285/4/H1582   (2955 words)

  
 Diabetes In Control - Biochemical Pathways for Microvascular Complications of Diabetes Mellitus
However, some data suggest that the production of reactive oxygen species is increased in the diabetic state and that reactive oxygen species may contribute to increased microvascular permeability and resultant microvascular damage.55,56 Additionally, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species can increase intracellular calcium levels in endothelial tissue culture.
Furthermore, increased flux through the sorbitol pathway is associated with above-normal superoxide formation.53 Increased reactive oxygen species may involve the generation of reducing equivalents in the form of unbound cytosolic NADH linked to increased sorbitol pathway activity, thereby providing the source of electrons needed by several enzyme systems to generate superoxide.
In regard to diabetes, free radical formation, regardless of the cause, results in damaged protein and mitochondrial DNA that can have deleterious effects on the microvasculature.19,54 Evidence of increased oxidative stress in diabetes is equivocal.
www.diabetesincontrol.com /modules.php?name=News&file=print&sid=1952   (2955 words)

  
 NADPH oxidase(s): new source(s) of reactive oxygen species in the vascular system? -- Van Heerebeek et al. 55 (8): 561 -- Journal of Clinical Pathology
Role of reactive oxygen species in bradykinin-induced mitogen activated protein kinase and c-fos induction in vascular cells.
Differential activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in smooth muscle cells by angiotensin II: involvement of p22phox and reactive oxygen species.
A variant of p22phox, involved in generation of reactive oxygen species in the vessel wall, is associated with progression of coronary atherosclerosis.
jcp.bmjjournals.com /cgi/content/full/55/8/561   (2955 words)

  
 Testosterone and IL-6 Requirements for Human C-Reactive Protein Gene Expression in Transgenic Mice -- Szalai et al. 160 (11): 5294 -- The Journal of Immunology
A fluorescent immunoassay for the quantification of C-reactive protein.
C-reactive protein: purification by affinity chromatography and physicochemical characterization.
Acute Phase Proteins: Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Clinical Applications 255.
www.jimmunol.org /cgi/content/full/160/11/5294   (4533 words)

  
 Genistein Inhibits Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Formation During Activation of Rat Platelets in Whole Blood
Reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced during collagen stimulation of platelets, can amplify signals mediated by the cytosolic protein tyrosine kinases, possibly by inhibiting phosphatase(s) and permitting activating protein tyrosine phosphate residues to accumulate.
Genistein Inhibits Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Formation During Activation of Rat Platelets in Whole Blood
This potential for antithrombotic action makes it important to obtain more information on how dietary isoflavones contribute to a prolongation of health and a diminution in the development of chronic diseases.
www.soyfoods.com /symposium/oa4c_5.html   (4533 words)

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