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Topic: Caeculus


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  Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 531 (v. 1)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
This child was Caeculus, who, after growing up to manhood, and living for a time as a robber, together with a number of com­ rades who were shepherds, built the town of Prae­ neste.
Caeculus, too, is, like Vulcan, a divinity of the hearth, because he is the son of Vulcan, was con­ ceived by a priestess of the hearth, and was found near a hearth (fire).
The manner in which Caeculus obtains settlers for his new town resembles the means by which Romulus contrived to get women for his Romans; but a still greater similarity exists be­ tween the stories of the conception of Caeculus and of king Servius Tullius.
www.ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/0540.html   (1080 words)

  
 Caeculus
This child was Caeculus, who, after growing up to manhood, and living for a time as a robber, together with a number of comrades who were shepherds, built the town of Praeneste.
The manner in which Caeculus obtains settlers for his new town resembles the means by which Romulus contrived to get women for his Romans; but a still greater similarity exists between the stories of the conception of Caeculus and of king Servius Tullius.
This resemblance, together with the connexion of Servius Tullius with Caia Caecilia, seem to indicate that Servius Tullius was the representative of the same idea at Rome as Caeculus was at Praeneste.
bulfinch.englishatheist.org /b/pantheon/Caeculus.html   (387 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 525 (v. 1)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
271, e.) Both her names, Caia and Caecilia,, are of the same root as Caeculus, and the Roman Caecilii are supposed to have derived their origin from the Praenestine Caeculus.
Caeculus.) The story of Caia Caecilia is related under tanaquil ; and it is sufficient to say here, that she appears in the early legends of Rome as a woman endowed with prophetic powers, and closely connected with the worship of the god of the hearth.
That she was, at the same time, looked upon as a model of domestic life, may be inferred from the fact, that a newly married woman, before entering the house of her husband, on being asked what her name was, answered, " My name is Caia." (VaL Max.
www.ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/0534.html   (1010 words)

  
 Caia Caecilia, Roman Goddess of Fire and Healing--Tanaquil Etruscan Roman goddess Etruscan goddess tarquin prophetess   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Caeculus's story shares many of the same motifs: it was said that his mother, a shepherd-woman, was seated by the hearth when a spark jumped out and landed in her lap, making her pregnant by the God Vulcan.
Later as a young man, Caeculus asked for a sign from his father to prove his divinity, and Vulcan answered by surrounding him with a ring of flames, much like the omen seen around the boy Servius.
Fire plays a part in many of the legends woven about Caia, and fire is used as emblematic of divinity in the story of Her male namesake, Caeculus: given Her Etruscan origins and the tales of Her exploits, it is tempting to see it as "the fire in the belly" of daring and audacity.
www.thaliatook.com /caiacaecilia.html   (1490 words)

  
 Greek Gods   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Strangely, this happened after an egg from Athena fell on the floor and joined with Hephaestus's semen and of it came Erechtheus, who later became king of Athens.
Other children of Hephaestus include Erichthonius, Cacus, and Caeculus.
Some stories, like one from Homer's Iliad, claim that Hephaestus was not married to Athena, but he was married to Aglaea, one of the Graces.
www.personal.psu.edu /users/m/w/mwp137/A2Assign7.html   (1001 words)

  
 Core Historical Literature of Agriculture (CHLA)
Annals of the Entomological Society of America: September, 1935 (Volume 28, Number 3)
Caeculus pettiti, a New Species of Mite from Virginia
Annals of the Entomological Society of America: September, 1943 (Volume 36, Number 3)
chla.library.cornell.edu /c/chla/browse/articles/nerlowemarc.html   (544 words)

  
 Vulcan - Wikipedia Mirror   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Mulciber redirects here, for the character in Paradise Lost, see Fallen Angel
Image:Diego Velasquez, The Forge of Vulcan.jpg Vulcan, in Roman mythology, is the son of Jupiter and Juno, husband of Maia and Venus, and father of Caeculus.
He was god of fire and volcanoes, and the manufacturer of art, arms, iron, and armor for gods and heroes.
www.wiki-mirror.be /index.php/Vulcan_(mythology)   (264 words)

  
 Aeneid, Book 7   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Allecto retreats back to the underworld; Latinus is upset and goes into seclusion; Juno tears open the gates of war (lines 740-879)
Catalog of the Italian Troops (lines 880-1122): Mezentius and his son Lausus, Aventinus, Catillus and Coras, Caeculus, Messapus, Clausus, Halaesus, Oebalus, Ufens, Umbro, Virbius (son of Hippolytus), Turnus, Camilla
All line numbers refer to the lines in the Fitzgerald translation.
www.personal.kent.edu /~bkharvey/roman/sources/virgil07.htm   (230 words)

  
 friends of Caeculus - advice and online shopping from dooyoo
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www.dooyoo.co.uk /member/Caeculus/trusts   (52 words)

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