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Topic: Calendar era


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In the News (Tue 12 Dec 17)

  
  Religious calendars: Baha'i, Christian, Hindu, Jewish, Mayan, Muslim, Sikh, W.C. O.T. C., Wicca and Zoroastrian
During the Christian era, the calendar was adjusted so that DEC-25 of the year 1 BCE was believed to be the birthday of Jesus Christ.
The base year for the calendar is the date of the coronation of the last Zoroastriaa Sasanian King, Yazdegird II in 631 CE.
Khurshedji Cama proposed a revised calendar in 1906 CE.
www.religioustolerance.org /rel_calendar.htm   (1063 words)

  
  Era
Era is also popularly used to denote the passing of shorter periods, such as the Big Band era, Disco era.
In a calendar, the era is the date from which years in the calendar are counted.
Japanese eras began with the ascension of an emperor.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/er/Era.html   (457 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - Zoroastrian calendar - Calendar Encyclopedia
The Zoroastrian calendar is a religious calendar used by members of the Zoroastrian faith, and it is an approximation of the (tropical) solar calendar.
This practice was not considered acceptable to the Zoroastrian priests, who consequently founded a new era, the era of Zoroaster - which incidentally led to the first serious attempt to establish a historical date for the prophet.
The Zoroastrian calendar uses the Y.Z. suffix for its calendar era (year numbering system), indicating the number of years since the coronation in 632 CE of Yezdegerd III, the last monarch of the Sassanian dynasty.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /Zoroastrian_calendar.htm   (1461 words)

  
 Japanese era name
Showa is the longest era as of 2003.
Historically however, prior to the Meiji Restoration, era names were changed on many different occasions such as celebration, major political incidents, natural disasters, and so on, but the emperors posthumous name never took the name of an era.
Incidently, on modern official papers, those who were born prior to the Meiji era did not write the era name in which they born, but wrote Edo period (though now no one born over 130 years ago in that time period is still alive now).
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ne/Nengou.html   (406 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: General Chronology
Era of Alexander, 12 November, 324 B.C. Greek Era of Seleucus, 1 September, 312 B.C. Era of Tyre, 19 October, 125 B.C. Cæsarian Era of Antioch, 9 August, 48 B.C., instituted to commemorate the battle of Pharsalia.
Era of Spain or of the Cæsars, 1 January, 38 B.C. Era of Augustus, 2 September, 31 B.C., instituted to commemorate the Battle of Actium.
Era of the Hegira, 16 July, A.D. 622, dates from the entrance of Mohammed into Medina after his flight from Mecca; its years are lunar, of 354 days each, except in intercalary years, of which there are eleven in each cycle of thirty.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/03738a.htm   (4118 words)

  
 JapaneseCalendar (icu4j)
The Japanese calendar is identical to the Gregorian calendar in all respects except for the year and era.
The ascension of each emperor to the throne begins a new era, and the years of that era are numbered starting with the year of ascension as year 1.
Eras are numbered starting with the Tenki era, which began in 1053 AD Gregorian, as era zero.
icu.sourceforge.net /apiref/icu4j/com/ibm/icu/util/JapaneseCalendar.html   (980 words)

  
 Calendar Converter
The Gregorian calendar was proclaimed by Pope Gregory XIII and took effect in most Catholic states in 1582, in which October 4, 1582 of the Julian calendar was followed by October 15 in the new calendar, correcting for the accumulated discrepancy between the Julian calendar and the equinox as of that date.
The Julian calendar was proclaimed by Julius Cæsar in 46 B.C. and underwent several modifications before reaching its final form in 8 C.E. The Julian calendar differs from the Gregorian only in the determination of leap years, lacking the correction for years divisible by 100 and 400 in the Gregorian calendar.
The Bahá'í calendar is a solar calendar organised as a hierarchy of cycles, each of length 19, commemorating the 19 year period between the 1844 proclamation of the Báb in Shiraz and the revelation by Bahá'u'lláh in 1863.
www.fourmilab.ch /documents/calendar   (5197 words)

  
 The Goddess Lunar Calendar
It is possible to devise a lunar calendar which is simple to use (only elementary arithmetic is required for its use — a computer is not needed) and which may be expected to stay in sync with the lunar phases over a period of several millennia.
Then I shall relate the Goddess Calendar to the Common Era Calendar (which is the same as the Gregorian Calendar except that instead of the A.D./B.C. year-numbering system the astronomical year-numbering sytem is used), and finally I shall provide software to allow conversion between dates in these two calendars.
To ensure this the calendar must be designed so that the average length of a calendar month is as close as possible to the synodic month (at least during the period in which the calendar is expected to be usable, preferably for a few thousand years at least).
www.hermetic.ch /cal_stud/lunarcal/lunarcal.htm   (3233 words)

  
 The Citizen Scientist   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Two millennia have passed since the inception of the Bikram Era (BE) calendar, and the time has come to update it due to the effects caused by the precession of the equinoxes.
The Bikram Era calendar is based on the sidereal year whereas the Western Gregorian calendar is based on the tropical year.
This doesn't apply to the Gregorian calendar, as it is based on the position of Earth in its orbit around the Sun, and the position of stars is not taken into account.
www.sas.org /tcs/weeklyIssues_2005/2005-04-08/feature2   (1034 words)

  
 The Goddess Lunar Calendar
It is possible to devise a lunar calendar which is simple to use (only elementary arithmetic is required for its use — a computer is not needed) and which may be expected to stay in sync with the lunar phases over a period of several millennia.
To ensure this the calendar must be designed so that the average length of a calendar month is as close as possible to the synodic month (at least during the period in which the calendar is expected to be usable, preferably for a few thousand years at least).
In order to relate the Goddess Calendar to the Common Era Calendar we have to identify a date in the former and a date in the latter calendar which are dates for the same day.
hermetic.nofadz.com /cal_stud/lunarcal/lunarcal.htm   (3228 words)

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