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Topic: Callisto (moon)


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In the News (Mon 17 Jun 19)

  
  Callisto
Jupiter IV Callisto ("ka LIS toh") is the eighth of Jupiter's known satellites and the second largest.
Callisto was a nymph, beloved of Zeus and hated by Hera.
Unlike Ganymede, Callisto seems to have little internal structure; however there are signs from recent Galileo data that the interior materials have settled partially, with the percentage of rock increasing toward the center.
seds.lpl.arizona.edu /nineplanets/nineplanets/callisto.html   (455 words)

  
  Callisto (moon)
Two enormous concentric ring impact basins are found on Callisto; Valhalla[?] is the largest with a bright central region that is 600 kilometers in diameter and rings extending to 3000 kilometers in diameter, and the second-largest impact basin is Asgard[?] measuring about 1600 kilometers in diameter.
Callisto's crust is thought to be approximately 4 billion years old, dating back almost to the formation of the solar system.
Galileo probe data suggest that the interior is composed of compressed rock and ice, with the percentage of rock increasing with depth due to partial settling of its constituents.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ca/Callisto_the_moon.html   (506 words)

  
 Jupiter Moon Callisto
Callisto [kah-LISS-toe] is the second largest moon of Jupiter, the third largest in the solar system, and is about the same size as Mercury.
A portion of the central zone of the large impact structure Valhalla on Callisto was imaged by the Galileo spacecraft on November 4, 1996.
This crater chain on Callisto is believed to result from the impact of a split object, similar to the fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 which smashed into Jupiter's atmosphere in July of 1994.
www.solarviews.com /eng/callisto.htm   (1458 words)

  
 Callisto (moon of Jupiter)
Orbiting beyond Jupiter's main radiation belts, Callisto is the outermost of the Galilean satellites.
Callisto's surface, the darkest of any of the Galilean moons (although still twice as bright as our own Moon), is the most heavily cratered of any object in the solar system, testifying to an almost complete absence of geological activity over the past 4 billion years.
Indeed, Callisto is the only body greater than 1,000 km in diameter which shows no signs of having undergone any significant resurfacing since the end of the early bombardment phase of the solar system about 3.8 billion years ago.
www.daviddarling.info /encyclopedia/C/Callisto.html   (441 words)

  
 Callisto
Jupiter IV Callisto ("ka LIS toh") is the eighth of Jupiter's known satellites and the second largest.
Callisto was a nymph, beloved of Zeus and hated by Hera.
Unlike Ganymede, Callisto seems to have little internal structure; however there are signs from recent Galileo data that the interior materials have settled partially, with the percentage of rock increasing toward the center.
www.seds.org /nineplanets/nineplanets/callisto.html   (455 words)

  
 NASA's Solar System Exploration: Planets: Jupiter: Moons: Callisto
Callisto is the outermost of the Galilean satellites, and orbits beyonds Jupiter's main radiation belts.
Callisto's surface is the darkest of the Galileans, but it is twice as bright as our own Moon.
In fact, Callisto is the only body greater than 1000 km in diameter in the solar system that has shown no signs of undergoing any extensive resurfacing since impacts have molded its surface.
solarsystem.nasa.gov /planets/profile.cfm?Object=Jup_Callisto   (232 words)

  
 Callisto (moon) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Callisto is named after Callisto, one of Zeus's many love interests in Greek mythology.
Although the name "Callisto" was suggested by Simon Marius soon after the moon's discovery, this name and the names of the other Galilean satellites fell into disfavour for a considerable time, and were not revived in common use until the mid-20th century.
Callisto is one of the most heavily cratered moons in the solar system.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Callisto_(moon)   (781 words)

  
 Callisto
Callisto is the outermost of Jupiter's four planet-sized moons and is dominated by impact craters.
Callisto is relatively brownish in color, possibly due to the contamination of the icy surface by meteoritic material.
This smoothness of Callisto's surface was not evident in images taken during the 1979 flyby of NASA's Voyager spacecraft because the resolution was insufficient to show the effect.
www.resa.net /nasa/callisto.htm   (1958 words)

  
 Sea and Sky's Tour of the Solar System: Callisto
Callisto was discovered by Galileo Galilei and Simon Marius in 1610 and is one of the four Galilean satellites.
Because its surface is so geologically inactive, astronomers believe that Callisto may represent what many of the moons in the solar system may have looked like at a much earlier stage in their development.
Callisto's core is believed to be composed of compressed rock and ice.
www.seasky.org /solarsystem/sky3f5.html   (412 words)

  
 SPACE.com -- Move Over Europa: An Ocean on Jupiter's Callisto?
Callisto's fate was decided, that it be considered the most boring of the four Galilean moons of Jupiter.
But Ruiz modeled Callisto with a wide range of these properties and found that the moon could hold water if the ice was thick enough and dense enough.
Khurana believes that because Callisto's insides are in a form of equilibrium, there will be no environmental niches like temperature gradients or reactions between water and minerals for life to colonize.
www.space.com /scienceastronomy/solarsystem/callisto_water_010726.html   (996 words)

  
 Space Today Online - Exploring Jupiter System - Jupiter's many moons   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
The moons travel in clusters and may well be pieces of larger objects that shattered in collisions with passing comets.
Callisto was discovered along with Io, Europa and Ganymede in 1610 as astronomer Galileo Galilei was skygazing from his garden in Padua, Italy.
Amalthea was the last moon to be discovered by direct visual observation — as opposed to photography — when it was spotted in 1892 by Edward Emerson Barnard using the 36 inch telescope at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton in California.
www.spacetoday.org /SolSys/Jupiter/JupiterMoons.html   (2570 words)

  
 Geological Society - News - Dreaming spires   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Callisto is peppered with strange icy features - spires that seem to be slowly eroding on a world long considered changeless and dead.
Callisto's icy surface is the most heavily cratered place in the Solar System.
Callisto's knobby terrain is unlike any seen before on Jupiter's moons - and appears not to be entirely unchanging, as previously thought.
www.geolsoc.org.uk /template.cfm?name=CallistoSpikes   (520 words)

  
 The Moon Callisto: Geologically Dead   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Callisto, like Ganymede and Europa, is covered by a frozen water ocean, but unlike the other Galilean satellites, Callisto is saturated with craters, suggesting very old terrain.
The cratering density on Callisto is essentially maximal, meaning that no higher density of craters could be formed because the formation of a new crater would on the average destroy one old crater.
The evidence suggests that the crust of Callisto probably froze as it was formed, and essentially nothing has happened geologically on Callisto for 4.5 billion years except for the influence of large and small meteor impacts.
csep10.phys.utk.edu /astr161/lect/jovian_moons/callisto.html   (189 words)

  
 Callisto
Of the 60 moons it is the 8th closest to Jupiter, with a standoff distance of 1,070,000 km.
It is the 2nd largest moon and is larger than the Earth's moon, with a diameter of 4800 km (2983 miles).
It is considered one of the Icy Moons because it is mostly made of ice.
www.windows.ucar.edu /tour/link=/jupiter/moons/callisto.html   (157 words)

  
 BBC - Science & Nature - Space - Callisto
Callisto is the darkest and densest of the four main 'Galilean moons' of Jupiter
Callisto is the last of the four main moons of Jupiter.
The surface of Callisto is pitted with a chain of craters....
www.bbc.co.uk /science/space/solarsystem/jupiter/callisto.shtml   (408 words)

  
 The Moons of Jupiter - Astronomy for Kids   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
The third Galilean moon is not only the largest (3157 miles in diameter) moon of Jupiter, it is the largest moon in the solar system and is actually larger than the planets Mercury and Pluto.
The surface of Callisto also has many more craters than Ganymede, and although the craters appear to be very ancient, they aren't as smooth as the ones on Ganymede, so the icy surface of Callisto doesn't appear to be as "active" as the one on Ganymede.
This moon is a little under 46 miles in diameter and orbits Jupiter from a distance of 7,042,200 miles.
www.dustbunny.com /afk/planets/jupiter/jupmoons.html   (1318 words)

  
 Space Today Online - Exploring Jupiter - JIMO - Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter - the moon Callisto
Callisto does not have any large mountains, probably because of the icy nature of its surface.
The NASA photo at right of the surface of Jupiter's icy moon Callisto was snapped in 1997 by the Galileo spacecraft from a distance of 5,700 miles.
Callisto's surface shows a transition from the inner part of an enormous crater, known as Asgard, to the outer surrounding plains.
www.spacetoday.org /SolSys/Jupiter/CallistoInfo.html   (599 words)

  
 NASA - Astrobiology - Latest News   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Billions of years ago, Callisto was punched hard by an asteroid or comet, forming the Valhalla impact basin.
However, says NASA scientist Dr. Torrence Johnson, "...an ocean on Callisto would not draw as much interest in a search for life as one on Europa." Life requires a source of energy, and photosynthesis is simply not possible when ice several kilometers thick blots out any light.
Callisto's surface of ice and rock is the most heavily cratered of any moon in the solar system, signifying that it is geologically "dead." Any geological activity would have erased at least some of the impact craters.
astrobiology.arc.nasa.gov /news/expandnews.cfm?id=1166   (715 words)

  
 Jupiter's moon Callisto makes a big splash
Callisto is approximately the size of the planet Mercury, making it the third largest moon in the Solar System, after Ganymede and Titan.
The icy surface is a poor conductor and the atmosphere is negligible.
Callisto is the second moon of Jupiter thought to harbor a sub-surface ocean.
science.nasa.gov /newhome/headlines/ast22oct98_2.htm   (1213 words)

  
 About Facts Net
Callisto is peppered with strange icy features -- spires that seem to be slowly eroding on a world long considered changeless and dead.
Callisto's knobby terrain is unlike any seen before on Jupiter's moons --and it's not entirely unchanging.
During the Callisto flyby, Galileo's camera saw spire-like "knobs" jutting 80 to 100 meters (260 to 330 feet) high, consisting perhaps of material thrown outward from a major impact billions of years ago.
aboutfacts.net /Astronomy7.htm   (617 words)

  
 2001 News Releases - Ocean Inside Jupiter's Moon Callisto May Have Cushioned Big Impact
The image shows a part of Callisto's surface directly opposite from the Valhalla basin where Callisto was punched by a major collision.
Earlier computer modeling of Callisto by Greeley and his student Allison Watts suggested that if Callisto had a liquid water layer in its interior, this layer would have dispersed the seismic shock waves from the ancient Valhalla impact.
Its surface of ice and rock is the most heavily cratered of any moon in the solar system, signifying that it is geologically "dead." There is no clear evidence that Callisto has experienced the volcanic activity or tectonic shifting that have erased some or all of the impact craters on Jupiter's other three large moons.
www.jpl.nasa.gov /releases/2001/release_2001_230.html   (632 words)

  
 Jupiter Moon Callisto   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Callisto is similar in appearance to Ganymede, but with more craters and fewer of the linear fault features.
This image of Callisto was taken by Voyager 2 from a distance of about 2.3 million kilometers.
Callisto is one of the largest four moons of Jupiter.
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu /hbase/solar/callisto.html   (269 words)

  
 Callisto - Uncyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Callisto is a moon orbiting Jupiter, named after Callisto (a moon orbiting Jupiter), named by Michael Brown after the Xena: Warrior Princess character.
With a mean orbit ten PI from its host planet, Callisto is the largest known spherical mirror known to exist.
The most prominent feature on the surface of Callisto is something whimsically called the Eye by astronomers.
www.uncyclopedia.org /wiki/Callisto   (152 words)

  
 Jupiter Moon Callisto
Callisto [kah-LISS-toe] is the second largest moon of Jupiter.
The moon is probably composed of a large rocky core surrounded by water and ice, giving it a dark color.
This image of an chain of craters on Callisto is 620 kilometers long.
www.if.ufrgs.br /ast/solar/callisto.htm   (303 words)

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