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Topic: Calorie


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In the News (Wed 22 May 19)

  
  Calories in Food, Calorie Content, Exercise to Burn Calories
For TONS of information about calories in food, nutrition in food, plus advice about which exercise is best for weight loss, PLUS how many calories are burned by exercise and fitness equipment.
Thus it seems obvious that the significant calorie surplus needed for obesity must be influenced by DNA and other genetic factors.
Good low calorie food includes fiber-rich foods (to fill your stomach); the best type of exercise to burn energy is aerobic exercise, although strength training is also useful to increase muscle mass thus raising your metabolism.
www.calorie-counter.net   (813 words)

  
  Calorie Calculator - Daily Caloric Needs
The calorie intake calculator provides an estimate of how many Calories (or kilojoules) you are currently burning per day.
Science tells us that 1 pound of fat is equal to 3500 calories, so a daily calorie deficit of 500 should result in 1 pound per week fat loss.
It is difficult to set absolute bottom calorie levels, because everyone has different body composition and activity levels.
www.freedieting.com /tools/calorie_calculator.htm   (617 words)

  
  § 12. Calorie / calorie. 4. Science Terms. The American Heritage Book of English Usage. 1996   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A Calorie with a capital C is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water 1 degree Celsius (°C).
Alternatively, a calorie with a lowercase c is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water 1 °C, or approximately 4 joules.
The small calorie is the calorie that you encounter frequently in chemistry and physics class.
www.bartleby.com /64/C004/012.html   (441 words)

  
  Calorie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The conversion factor between calories and joules is numerically equivalent to the specific heat capacity of liquid water (in SI units).
Experimental values of this calorie ranged from 4.1852 J to 4.1858 J. The CIPM in 1950 published a mean experimental value of 4.1855 J, noting an uncertainty of 0.0005 J. 20 °C calorie: the amount of energy required to warm 1 g of air-free water from 19.5 °C to 20.5 °C at a constant pressure of 101.325 kPa (1 atm).
Mean calorie: 1/100 of the amount of energy required to warm 1 g of air-free water from 0 °C to 100 °C at a constant pressure of 101.325 kPa (1 atm).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Calorie   (1166 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - calorie (Physics) - Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The 15° calorie, or normal calorie, is widely used in chemistry and physics; it is measured by heating a 1-gram water sample from 14.5°C to 15.5°C at 1 atmosphere pressure.
The 4° calorie, also called the small calorie or therm, is measured from 3.5°C to 4.5°C (water is most dense at 3.98°C); the large calorie, or Calorie, is equivalent to 1,000 small calories.
The average value of the calorie in the range 0°C to 100°C is called the mean calorie; it is 1/100 of the energy needed to heat 1 gram of water from its melting point to its boiling point.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/calorie.html   (268 words)

  
 NDI Terminology - calorie   (Site not responding. Last check: )
or large calorie): The calorie used in metabolic studies, being the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water 1 degree Celsius (centigrade), specifically from 14.5° to 15.5°C at a pressure of 1 atmosphere; abbreviated kg-cal.
The calorie used in chemistry and biochemistry is equal to exactly 4.184 joules.
The use of the large calorie survives only in nutrition, where calorie, now usually written with a small "c," means kilocalorie when specifying the energy content of foods.
www.ndif.org /Terms/calorie.html   (164 words)

  
 calorie. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
The 15° calorie, or normal calorie, is widely used in chemistry and physics; it is measured by heating a 1-gram water sample from 14.5°C to 15.5°C at 1 atmosphere pressure.
The 4° calorie, also called the small calorie or therm, is measured from 3.5°C to 4.5°C (water is most dense at 3.98°C); the large calorie, or Calorie, is equivalent to 1,000 small calories.
The average value of the calorie in the range 0°C to 100°C is called the mean calorie; it is 1/100 of the energy needed to heat 1 gram of water from its melting point to its boiling point.
www.bartleby.com /65/ca/calorie.html   (230 words)

  
 Food energy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
One calorie is the amount of energy (heat) to raise the temperature of one gram of water one degree Celsius.
The magnitude of human energy requirements makes it awkward to use such a small unit, so the convention of the capitalized Calorie is equal to 1000 lowercase calories, and is abbreviated kcal to indicate that is 1000 times as large as the calorie.
One Calorie is approximately equal to 4.1868 kilojoules.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Calorie_(food)   (601 words)

  
 Calorie Summary
A calorie is defined as: "the energy required to raise the temperature of one gram of pure water by one degree Centigrade under standard conditions." The standard conditions involve an atmospheric pressure of one atmosphere, and a temperature change from -4.1 to -2.3°F (15.5-16.5°C).
The conversion factor between calories and joules is numerically equivalent to the specific heat capacity of liquid water (in SI units).
Experimental values of this calorie ranged from 4.1852 J to 4.1858 J. The CIPM in 1950 published a mean experimental value of 4.1855 J, noting an uncertainty of 0.0005 J. 20 °C calorie: the amount of energy required to warm 1 g of air-free water from 19.5 °C to 20.5 °C at a constant pressure of 101.325 kPa (1 atm).
www.bookrags.com /Calorie   (1503 words)

  
 Is a low-calorie diet the secret to longevity? - Eating Well - MSNBC.com
Calories are typically cut anywhere from 25 percent up to 40 percent.
The founder of the movement, the late Dr. Roy Walford, advocated reducing daily calories over time to achieve a target body weight that is somewhere between 10 and 25 percent less than your weight when you were in your late teens or early 20s (assuming that you were not overweight or obese at that age).
The assumption is these calories will include foods that have maximum nutritional power, ranging from protein, to fat, to vitamins and minerals.
www.msnbc.msn.com /id/15592368   (581 words)

  
 Calorie - MSN Encarta
The small, or gram, calorie (cal) is usually specified in science and engineering as the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 g of water from 14.5° to 15.5° C. The temperature interval is sometimes specified in other ways.
A slightly different calorie is used in engineering, the international calorie, which equals 1/860 international watt-hour (W h).
A large calorie, or kilocalorie (Cal), usually referred to as a calorie and sometimes as a kilogram calorie, equals 1000 cal and is the unit used to express the energy-producing value of food in the calculation of diets.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761567840/Calorie.html   (152 words)

  
 Reversing Aging Rapidly With Short-Term Calorie Restriction
On top of that, the fact that calorie restriction acts rapidly means that, for the first time, it is possible to test anti-aging interventions in weeks rather than years, which should drastically accelerate the search for anti-aging treatments.
The long-term calorie restriction mice were those mice who had spent their whole lives being under-fed by 40% until the age of 27 months.
Finally, the short-term calorie restricted mice were, as I mentioned, switched from fully fed to under-fed for just four weeks, and even at that only two weeks with "full strength" calorie restriction.
www.lef.org /featured-articles/spindler_press_release01.html   (2510 words)

  
 Calorie Care
Calories are a measure of the energy contained in the food we consume.
With Calorie Care's meals, you can be sure that you are contributing to your future health in many ways even if these benefits are not visible on your waist line.
We recommend a daily calorie intake target that allows you to lose a safe 0.5-1.0 kg per week in a manner that is sustainable and contributes to your overall health.
www.caloriecare.com /faqs.htm   (1665 words)

  
 New data on calorie intakes
In rural India, average calorie intake fell from 2,266 Kcals in 1972-73 to 2,221 in 1983 and to 2,153 in 1993-94.
Secondly, calorie intake per person in West Bengal, which was below the national average in 1972-73, moved to a position above the national average in 1993-94.
The data on average calorie intakes and changes in intakes are illustrated in Figures 1 and 2 and Figures 3 and 4 respectively.
www.flonnet.com /fl1605/16051090.htm   (1389 words)

  
 Mimicking Low Calorie Diet with Drugs
The researchers believe it may be possible to design drugs that imitate many of the beneficial effects of calorie restriction resulting in the prevention of diseases, such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer, which are more common in people who are overweight.
The researchers compared the profile of calorie restriction with the profiles produced by compounds known to have some properties similar to calorie restriction, including the ability to suppress factors that lead to a number of diseases.
Calorie restriction is also known to protect animals from chemical exposure, and the investigators found that the protection afforded by calorie restriction in normal mice was lost in PPARalpha-mutant mice.
hopkinsnet.jhu.edu /servlet/page?_pageid=963&_dad=portal30p&_schema=PORTAL30P   (548 words)

  
 Heath-Diet -Calorie Needs
Technically, one calorie is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water 1 degree Centigrade (from 14.5 to 15.5).
The 'calorie' measure used commonly to discuss the energy content of food is actually a kilocalorie (KCal) or 1000 real calories; this is the amount of energy required to raise one kilogram of water (about 2.2 pounds) one degree Centigrade.
This reduction in calorie needs is due partly to an increase in body fat percentage that comes with age.
www.webindia123.com /health/diet/calorie/calorie.htm   (345 words)

  
 Howstuffworks "How many calories does a person need daily?"   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The number of calories the body consumes in a day is different for every person.
This accounts for about 60 to 70 percent of calories burned in a day and includes the energy required to keep the heart beating, the lungs breathing, the eyelids blinking and the body temperature stabilized.
The total number of calories a body needs in a day is the sum of these three calculations.
science.howstuffworks.com /question457.htm   (431 words)

  
 Calorie Counter - calories in food and calorie counting to lose weight
Calorie counting is the best way to lose weight, if you eat less calories than you burn in a day you will lose weight, and you can include your favourite foods.
Calories in alcohol are a good illustration; alcohol has 7 calories per gram and little or no nutritional value.
Everything you need for losing weight by calorie counting can be found in the weight loss resources kit including calories in food, an exercise calorie chart and comprehensive tools for setting goals and monitoring progress.
www.caloriecounting.co.uk /resources/intro.htm   (829 words)

  
 1000 Calorie Diet Menu
Cutting back to 1000 calories a day is pretty drastic, and should only be used if you just want to lose a few pounds quickly, or feel the need to kick-start a longer term weight loss plan.
It is not recommended that calories be so restricted for more than one week - for most people this level of calories is too low to obtain enough nutrition, and may have the effect of slowing metabolism.
To find out how many calories you need to lose weight at your chosen rate, and how many calories in different foods and drinks, log on to www.weightlossresources.co.uk and take a free trial.
www.weightlossresources.co.uk /calories/calorie_counting/1000_diet_menu.htm   (616 words)

  
 Interventions to Improve Calorie Intake in Children with Cystic Fibrosis
Despite its importance for long-term health outcomes, children with CF and their families find it very difficult to meet this daily calorie requirement and adherence to this part of the medical regimen is very poor.
Videotaped studies of dinnertime meals in families caring for a child with CF have indicated that the strategies parents use to increase their child’s calorie intake are not effective.
In the BI intervention, parents were taught to provide reinforcement for achieving calorie goals, use differential attention to ignore noncompliant behaviors but attend to eating behaviors, and to use contingencies to increase behaviors that were compatible with greater calorie intake.
www.apa.org /pi/cyf/fam5.html   (919 words)

  
 calorie
In principle, 1 calorie is the amount of heat necessary to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water 1° Celsius at a pressure of 1 atmosphere.
The most common calorie, in which the water temperature is raised from 14.5°C to 15.5°C, is sometimes called the 15°C calorie.
The calorie used by physiologists and dieters is based on raising the temperature of a kilogram of water 1°C, and is about a thousand times bigger.
www.sizes.com /units/calorie.htm   (333 words)

  
 Calorie definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular medical terms
In nutrition terms, the word calorie is used instead of the more precise scientific term kilocalorie which represents the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of a liter of water one degree centigrade at sea level.
The common usage of the word calorie of food energy is understood to refer to a kilocalorie and actually represents, therefore, 1000 true calories of energy.
A calorie is also known as cal, gram calorie, or small calorie.
www.medterms.com /script/main/art.asp?articlekey=8567   (150 words)

  
 Negative Calorie Foods! Are they for real?
Calories from these foods are much harder for the body to breakdown and process.
The ingestion of empty calorie foods requires the body to produce its own enzymes (usually in the lining of the intestinal tract) to be able to convert these “empty calories” into usable energy.
Surprisingly, in the case of the negative calorie foods in question not only do they contain sufficient vitamins and minerals to break down the host calories there is actually a surplus of these enzyme producing biochemicals.
www.healthrecipes.com /negative_calorie_foods.htm   (1530 words)

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